Our Complete Guide To Mesothelioma is An Informational Resource To Diagnosis, Treatment Options and Legal Rights After A Mesothelioma Diagnosis

John Lipsitz and Michael Ponterio’s shared commitment to seeking justice for victims of the asbestos industry led them to form Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC in 1995. John Comerford joined the firm the same year as a law clerk and later became a partner. In January 2021 the name of the firm was changed to Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC to recognize the important role played by John Comerford. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have a combined total of nearly 100 years of experience representing clients who have been injuriously exposed to asbestos.

John Lipsitz, Michael Ponterio and John Comerford have led the way in shaping asbestos law in New York State. Michael obtained the first personal injury jury verdict in an asbestos-related disease case in the State of New York while defending the plaintiff, an asbestos worker. The jury imposed punitive damages on the defendant asbestos manufacturer for its reckless disregard of the rights of the plaintiff (Racich v. Celotex Corporation). Two years later, Michael Ponterio and John Lipsitz obtained the first personal injury jury verdict in an asbestos-related personal injury case in Buffalo, New York. Again, the plaintiff was an asbestos worker, this time from the Union’s Buffalo local (Wolf v. Celotex Corporation). In November 2019, John Comerford obtained an $8 million verdict for a former Kodak worker diagnosed with mesothelioma, possibly the largest Monroe County asbestos verdict to date.

In the decades since Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford was founded, our attorneys have recovered over a billion dollars on behalf of their clients diagnosed with mesothelioma.

For John Lipsitz, Michael Ponterio, and John Comerford, the connections to this cause are incredibly personal.

For generations, the Lipsitz family has been rooted in the labor movement. With a career spanning six decades, John’s father Richard Lipsitz, Sr. was the preeminent attorney representing the interests of labor unions and workers throughout Western New York. Seeing how honorable and well-respected their father was made following in his footsteps an easy decision for both his sons—although in different capacities. John’s brother has long occupied a leadership position in the local labor movement, and John, driven by his personal connection to the victims of asbestos exposure, chose to practice law.

For the Ponterio family, the link to asbestos-related law was established two generations ago. Both Michael’s father and grandfather dedicated portions of their lives to the Durez plant in North Tonawanda, a location connected to dozens of asbestos-related deaths. After his grandfather gave 37 years to the company, Michael’s father spent his days at the plant and his nights in law school. Once Michael witnessed, firsthand, the deadly impact asbestos exposure had on employees, he committed himself to finding justice for the victims.

Sadly, the effects of toxic industrial exposure have been felt across all of Western New York. Along with the firm’s connection to the Durez plant, the Love Canal disaster in Niagara Falls directly impacted the family of Senior Partner John Comerford. Not only did John’s uncle live in the neighborhood, but his father was a local physician tasked with treating many of the first victims of the industrial exposure associated with Love Canal. This experience instructed John’s choice to study Environmental Science at Cornell University and to seek a law degree. Fortunately, John was able to use this unique—and challenging—experience to provide the perspective, tenacity, and drive that would help propel him from law clerk to partner in 2001.

To date, the firm is responsible for recovering over a billion dollars on behalf of their clients diagnosed with mesothelioma. And while their focus has been, first and foremost, justice for their clients, they continue to pursue a lasting legacy of both shaping asbestos law in New York State and protecting future generations from becoming victims of similar corporate negligence.

We hope that you will never be diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer, or suffer a catastrophic injury, but if you are, contact us at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford so we can begin the fight.

Intro to Mesothelioma

According to the New York State Department of Health, about 200 new mesothelioma cases are diagnosed in the state each year. While the health department considers this to be a rare disease, it is deadly. The American Cancer Society indicates an 18% survival rate for five years after the disease is diagnosed. And that’s the best-case scenario.

The lawyers at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford LLC have decades of experience providing mesothelioma legal services to victims in the Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester, NY areas. If you’ve been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we’d be honored to help you.

What is Mesothelioma?

Mesothelioma is a deadly form of cancer that attacks the lining of the lungs, abdomen, and other vital organs of the body. The only known cause of this disease is asbestos, which is a fiber that cannot be absorbed by the human body.

This toxic fiber is commonly found in a wide variety of products, and although laws have become stricter since the 1970s, asbestos is still not banned in the United States.

About 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma across the country each year, and the majority of those who are diagnosed do not survive another full year. Mesothelioma is referred to as a latent disease. It often remains hidden for 20 or more years after exposure, which means that it’s not always caught early enough to be treated.

There are four primary places where mesothelioma can be centered. These include:

» The lungs (pleural mesothelioma)

» The abdomen (peritoneal mesothelioma)

» The heart (pericardial mesothelioma)

» The testes

While the last two are quite rare, each goes through four distinct stages: Limited, localized, generalized, and full-body affliction.

Mesothelioma of the Lungs

Pleural mesothelioma affects the lining of the lungs. About 75% of mesothelioma cases are of this type and it is often misdiagnosed as lung cancer.

Some of the symptoms of this disease include:

» Persistent coughing

» Chest tightness and pain

» Trouble breathing

»   Problems swallowing

» Fatigue

» Weight loss

»  Pain in the shoulders and upper back

When pleural mesothelioma is diagnosed early, the cancer might not have a chance to spread further than the lungs. This means that it could be treatable with surgery. Patients who begin treatment at Stage 1 have the longest life expectancy.

Mesothelioma of the Abdomen

Peritoneal mesothelioma occurs when the cancer affects the lining of your abdominal cavity. This is where your primary organs are, including the stomach and intestines.

Symptoms include:

» Swelling of the abdomen

» Nausea and vomiting

» Weight loss

» Blood in vomit

» Blood in stool

» Pain in the abdomen

» Fatigue

» Night sweats

» Appetite loss

Peritoneal mesothelioma can take 20 or more years to develop. It is caused by breathing in or swallowing asbestos particles.

This disease can be easily missed or misdiagnosed because the symptoms are similar to other digestive disorders, such as Crohn’s disease or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

If you or a loved one has been misdiagnosed, you may have cause for a medical malpractice claim. Talk to the attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, to learn more.

Mesothelioma of the Heart

Pericardial mesothelioma is the rarest form of mesothelioma, and it develops in the lining around the heart. People diagnosed with this form of the cancer rarely live more than six months.

Symptoms can include heart murmurs, palpitations, and irregular heartbeat.

Mesothelioma of the Testes

Testicular mesothelioma happens when the disease develops in the lining of the testes. It is quite rare and can include symptoms such as testicle swelling and inflammation of the lining of the testicles. Patients diagnosed with this form of cancer may live two to three years with proper treatment.

What Causes Mesothelioma?

Mesothelioma is a signature tumor caused by prior asbestos exposure. Asbestos is a natural mineral fiber that has been used in millions of household and commercial products. This material cannot be absorbed by the body.

Exposure commonly happens through breathing or swallowing particles of asbestos that are present in the air.

Asbestos has been used since the 1970s in all kinds of building materials and consumer products. It is in wall boards, plumbing insulation, housing insulation, roof shingles, vehicle brakes, electrical products, and much more.

As such, the highest concentration of mesothelioma cancer is found in blue-collar workers, trade workers, and veterans who have routinely worked with asbestos-infested materials.

Examples include:

»  Plumbers

» Pipefitters

» Welders

» Roofers

» Navy machinists

»   Electricians

»   Steelworkers

» Oil refinery workers

»   Brake mechanics

Military veterans and civilian contractors are at high risk if they worked in naval shipyards or aboard navy vessels prior to the late 1970s, as asbestos products were liberally used by the government during that time period.

Secondary risk factors include exposure as a family member of these workers or residing near an asbestos mine.

Many companies knew how dangerous the mineral was, yet actively worked to hide that information from the government and the general public through the late 1970s. Even 50 years later, asbestos is still allowed to be used in the United States.

That is why the legal team at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford fights so hard to help mesothelioma victims and their families to get the compensation they deserve.

How Can Mesothelioma Be Treated?

The first step in treatment is to get the disease diagnosed properly. If you have symptoms of mesothelioma and you believe you were exposed to asbestos, get a medical opinion.

Medical specialists can run blood tests, examine fluid extracted from afflicted areas, and conduct a CT scan to determine whether there are tumors present in your body. You are normally diagnosed with mesothelioma by a biopsy, a surgical procedure in which the surgeon takes a piece of your tumor tissue and tests it for mesothelioma.

The treatment of mesothelioma depends on many factors such as location of the cancer, the stage of the disease, patient’s age, and overall health of the patient. Standard treatment options can include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation procedures, and/or a combination of these therapies depending on each patient’s circumstance.

Surgery is an option for patients who are in relatively good health when the disease is diagnosed early enough. Treatment includes physically removing cancerous tumors from the body, which may allow the patient to live a long and healthy life. Treatment includes pleurectomy/decortication, which is a surgical removal of the pleura, the lining of the lungs. Another surgical procedure is extra-pleural pneumonectomy, which is the removal of the pleura as well as the entire lung and in some cases, partial removal of the diaphragm and pericardium. This is a radical treatment and should only be done by a medical center that specializes in this type of treatment.

Chemotherapy is an option for patients who do not want surgery or have contraindications for a surgical procedure. Chemotherapy is a drug treatment plan designed to destroy the cancer cells and prevent them from spreading. Drugs are placed directly in the bloodstream. For mesothelioma, the goal of chemotherapy is not to cure the cancer, but to shrink the tumors and prevent the spread of the disease. Drugs that have proven useful include doxorubicin, gemcitabine, cisplatin, carboplatin, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, vinorelbine, paclitaxel, and methotrexate.

Radiation is another option to target and kill cancer cells. This technique can have the unfortunate side effect of killing healthy cells, too, along with many other symptoms. Intense x-rays are used to shrink tumors and destroy cancer cells. Radiation is effective for treating localized tumors and relieving pain but can be difficult to use without causing further damage to the lungs, heart, and liver.

Combining therapy methods is a common tactic for treatment of many mesothelioma patients. Combination therapy involves using two or more of the treatments simultaneously in an attempt to improve the odds of success.

How Does Mesothelioma Progress?

Mesothelioma is often missed or misdiagnosed. Some victims have gone through many incorrect diagnoses before finally discovering what was wrong. Because of these compounded problems, many patients do not live more than one year after being diagnosed.

With that said, there are four stages of progression that a patient might experience.

If a patient is diagnosed early, in the first stage of the disease, the cancer hasn’t had a chance to spread further than the initial site (lungs, abdomen, heart, testes). In some cases, the condition can be treated with surgery. Patients who begin treatment at this stage have the longest life expectancy.

Stage 2 happens when the cancer has begun to spread further than the initially affected site. Stage 3 mesothelioma occurs when the organs are affected.

Stage 4 mesothelioma is the term used to describe a spread of cancer throughout a patient’s body. Prognosis is usually poor at this stage, with an average life expectancy of one year after diagnosis.

What Is Asbestos and How are People Exposed to It?

Asbestos is actually a naturally-occurring fibrous mineral that has been used since the stone age.

There are six different types of asbestos fibers, and each one releases microscopic dust into the air when moved around, rubbed, or otherwise utilized. This dust is like a miniature crystal substance that is quite toxic to the human body. It is known to cause cancer, specifically mesothelioma, in major organs.

Because of its heat-resistant properties, asbestos was widely used across the United States in building materials until the late 1970s.

Some of the building products it was used in include:

» Wall insulation

»   Plumbing insulation

»   Electrical wiring

» Wall paneling

» Floor tiles

» Roof shingles

» Caulking

» Cement

You might be surprised at the long list of known asbestos products. Despite how toxic this substance is, it is still a risk in Buffalo, Syracuse, Rochester, and other parts of the state today.

When asbestos products were installed, repaired, maintained, renovated, or removed, the asbestos was scraped, cut, sanded, or mixed with other products, such as cement. These processes created asbestos dust, which was then breathed in by workers. Asbestos dust remains airborne for weeks, affecting those who worked directly with asbestos, as well as those who simply worked nearby. When an area is swept, the dust is stirred up and airborne again. One cloud of dust contains millions or billions of asbestos fibers.

According to the New York Department of Labor, the biggest risk of exposure to asbestos is to blue-collar workers. Skilled tradesmen and women are at risk of asbestos exposure every day, both due to the products they used and where they worked.

Any trade specialist who works on residential or commercial buildings that were built before 1980 is likely at risk. This includes:

» Roofers

» Carpenters

» Plumbers

»   Electricians

» Drywall hangers

» General contractors

» Repair people

»   Landscapers

Military veterans, particularly Navy veterans, are particularly at risk. The U.S. government used asbestos products liberally both on ships and in shipyards, exposing military and civilian personnel to potentially high levels of this toxic substance.

Even though the asbestos risk was discovered in the late ‘70s and changes began to take place, there are still thousands of buildings in this country that were built before then. If someone buys an older home and begins renovations unknowingly, they may be exposed to asbestos.

While asbestos is most commonly found in the workplace and older buildings, there are an inordinate number of everyday household items that put people at risk. One particular menace is talc.

Talcum powder is used in items such as:

» Baby powder

» Face powder

» Bath powder

» Paint

» Rubber

»  Fertilizer

»   Pesticide

»  Plastics

» Wires

» Tableware

Talc is even in some foods and food processing. Due to the extensive use of this toxic substance in so many household names, there are many lawsuits against companies for defec- tive products.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC specializes in helping victims of asbestos exposure in lawsuits like these.

Diagnosis and Misdiagnosis

One of the biggest problems with asbestos exposure is that symptoms often do not develop for over 20 years. And since those symptoms are similar to those of other syndromes and diseases, the cancer is not often caught early enough to treat it effectively.

The symptoms of abdomen cancer include pain, swelling, and fatigue. The condition can often be mistaken for more modern medical issues, including:

»   Crohn’s disease

» Irritable bowel syndrome

» Leaky gut syndrome

» Gluten intolerance

» Stress or anxiety

Pleural mesothelioma is often mistaken for other types of lung cancer, even when a patient has never smoked cigarettes a day in their lives.

If you’ve worked jobs where you suspect or know you were exposed to asbestos, you owe it to yourself to get a second or third opinion when you have related medical problems.

Mesothelioma is an expensive disease to treat, and it can leave you and your family devastated very quickly. Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC can help review your circumstances and work with you to get the compensation you deserve.

Can I Sue for Asbestos Exposure?

If you’ve been a victim of asbestos exposure, you may have legal recourse. Some of the avenues you might pursue include class actions, product liability claims, workers’ compensation, malpractice cases, or wrongful death claims.

Please be advised that New York State imposes strict limitations to file a lawsuit for mesothelioma. The statute of limitations for a personal injury action based on asbestos exposure and disease requires that an action be commenced within three years of the date of diagnosis. In the case of death, an action for wrongful death, must be filed within two years of the date of death or the claim is barred. However, the statute of limitations often depends on the particular facts of your case. Time is of the essence, which is why it is important to contact an attorney as soon as possible.

May I still file a case if I’m a smoker?

YES. Smoking is not a cause of mesothelioma or asbestosis. Only asbestos exposure can cause these illnesses. Asbestos and cigarette smoke can work together to cause lung cancer and smoking can increase your chances of developing lung cancer.

How Can I Get Help?

There are a number of different options for help for people with mesothelioma, as well as for families who have had loved ones die from the disease. Here are some of the ways that you can seek emotional and financial help.

Get More Information

Make sure you’re making informed decisions about your specific situation by gathering all of the information you can. Get our free book about mesothelioma to learn more about this disease, its causes, and ways we can help.

Join a Support Group

A variety of in-person and online support groups exist to provide emotional support. Families who have lost loved ones to this disease may find comfort in mesothelioma grief groups. Those who suffer from the disease can find patient and survivor support groups.

File for Workers’ Compensation

From a financial standpoint, if you were exposed to asbestos through your job, you may qualify for a workers’ compensation claim. Workers’ compensation is insurance that protects you if you’re injured, made ill, or killed while working.

Mesothelioma is an illness that results from asbestos exposure. Most mesothelioma cases result from occupational exposure. If your claim is approved, workers’ compensation will pay for all of your related medical bills.

Examples include:

»   Hospital bills

» Doctor bills

» Medical tests and scans

»   Prescriptions

» Surgeries

» Medical devices

It may also pay for income that you’ve lost from being sick, pay for reeducation or rehabilitation, or help to contribute toward your living expenses.

Get a Free Mesothelioma Case Consultation

Since 1995, the attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford LLC have been helping clients in Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, NY, who have been injured due to asbestos exposure. Through our tireless efforts, we have made an impact on reforming asbestos laws throughout the state of New York. We have a full team of lawyers devoted to representing people exposed to asbestos with mesothelioma.

If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, please contact us today and we will schedule an appointment to come to your home and meet with you and your family to explain your legal rights.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Peritoneal mesothelioma is cancer of the stomach lining. It occurs with asbestos particles are ingested. It is not as common as mesothelioma of the lining of the lungs, but it is just as malignant. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma because of asbestos exposure in your workplace, home, or environment, you may be entitled to compensation for your medical bills, lost wages, and more.

Keep reading to learn more about peritoneal mesothelioma.

What Is Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

Peritoneal mesothelioma occurs when cancer from asbestos exposure develops in the lining of the abdomen wall. This is the second most common type of mesothelioma, affecting nearly 300 Americans each year.

The abdomen holds most of a person’s major organs, including the intestines, liver, gallbladder, and stomach. These organs are at risk of becoming cancerous when the disease progresses into later stages.

What Causes Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

The only known cause for any form of mesothelioma is exposure to asbestos, a toxic substance that the human body cannot absorb.

Asbestos is a natural mineral with a fibrous texture. This mineral creates a fine particle dust that carries easily in the air. When people handle products made from this material or when they live around industrial areas where asbestos-containing products are manufactured, the asbestos can settle in and around their home, clothing, and hair.

Who Is Most at Risk?

The largest group of people who are diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma are blue-collar workers, military veterans, and civilians who worked in naval shipyards. This includes:

Navy veterans who lived aboard ships or worked in shipyards before 1980

»   Electricians

» Plumbers

» Roofers

» Carpenters

» Drywall hangers

» Renovators

» Concrete laborers

» Bricklayers

» General laborers

»   Landscapers

Secondary effects have been recorded in family members of these primary groups, as well. This type of exposure happens when someone works around asbestos and gets fibers on themselves and in their clothing. When they come home to a spouse and children, the asbestos dust is carried into the home environment with them.

In fact, many family members in the ‘60s and ‘70s were routinely exposed to asbestos fibers simply by washing the family’s clothing each week.

Other documented cases show that large neighborhoods of people were exposed due to living near a manufacturing facility that used asbestos liberally, such as the Durez manufacturing plant in New York. Others were affected by living near mining operations, such as the Basalt mines in Jefferson County.

In some cases, the asbestos dust from these facilities carried for miles on the wind and settled inside houses.

What Are the Symptoms of Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

The primary symptoms of peritoneal mesothelioma are abdominal distention and pain. Several other symptoms include:

» Loss of appetite

» Stomach swelling

» Unexplained weight loss

»   Constipation or diarrhea

» Night sweats and chills

» Nausea

» Fever

These symptoms are similar to those of several other diseases and disorders, which can make the cancer difficult to identify and treat in a timely manner.

How Is Peritoneal Mesothelioma Diagnosed?

Since peritoneal mesothelioma symptoms may not begin to appear until 20 years after the asbestos poisoning, the disease can be misdiagnosed for quite some time.

When a patient feels that they may be at risk from asbestos exposure, they can insist on multiple medical opinions and have several tests run.

The two primary types of tests that a doctor may use are scans and biopsies. A CT scan or X-ray may help doctors to see tumor growth on the abdomen wall or on any major organs.

The results from scans are not always conclusive. A biopsy is the only definitive way to detect this condition. This means the doctor must extract tissue or fluid from the abdomen lining and have it tested in a lab.

Your best option is to consult with a mesothelioma specialist in the Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester, NY, areas. A specialist is more experienced in dealing with this disease and is less likely to misdiagnose it.

What Are the Chances of Survival for Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

There are four stages of peritoneal mesothelioma. The stage of the condition at the time of diagnosis plays a big role in determining which treatment options are available, and how much longer the patient may live.

Stage 1 is the earliest stage, and it has the best potential outcome. When peritoneal mesothelioma is detected this early, there’s a good chance that surgery may be successful.

Patients generally only qualify for surgery when they’re in the earliest stages if they’re also relatively healthy. People with Stage 1 peritoneal mesothelioma might live another two to five years: however, only 18% of people with this disease live longer than five years after diagnosis.

Stage 2 of peritoneal mesothelioma means that the cancer has begun to spread, but it may still be operable. Again, the patient must be relatively healthy to qualify for surgery, and the doctor may also use chemotherapy in combination with the surgical procedure. Patients with Stage 2 live approximately 18 months after diagnosis with successful treatment.

Stage 3 is when most people discover they have peritoneal mesothelioma, as most symptoms begin appearing at this stage. This stage is more advanced which means that surgery cannot always be performed as a treatment. The doctor may elect to use a combination of chemo and radiation.

When diagnosed at this stage, the life expectancy may only be another 16 months.

Stage 4 is the most advanced stage of peritoneal mesothelioma. At this stage, the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Depending on the specific patient, radiation may be an option, but most patients at this stage simply receive care to manage pain and keep them comfortable. People with Stage 4 peritoneal mesothelioma usually live less than 12 months after diagnosis.

What Are the Treatment Options for Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

The primary treatment options for peritoneal mesothelioma are surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. There are also some treatments currently undergoing trials.

Surgery is currently the best-known treatment approach, but it is only viable for Stage 1 and Stage 2 patients.

When surgery is an option, the doctor may remove all tumors seen during surgery. They may also opt to implement more drastic measures, including removing organs or removing the abdominal lining itself.

Chemotherapy is another common treatment approach. This one is often used in combination with surgery.

Chemo uses one or more cancer-inhibiting drugs. These drugs don’t cure peritoneal mesothelioma, but they can help slow the growth or reduce the size of existing tumors.

Radiation is the third most common treatment approach for this disease. This treatment involves using targeted, painless laser beams into the patient’s body. These beams destroy cancer cells. However, they can also kill healthy cells.

The last approach is less of a treatment and more of a care approach. Palliative care is synonymous with end of life care or hospice. It is also sometimes called supportive care.

Patients who are in Stage 4 often receive this type of care. The goal of the care is to simply limit suffering and optimize the remaining quality of life.

How Can Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford Help?

If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma, you have legal and financial recourse.

In the state of New York, you must take steps quickly, however, because you only have three years to make a claim once you know about the illness. And since this disease progresses so quickly, some victims must leave the final steps of the process to their surviving family members.

The experienced peritoneal mesothelioma attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford specialize in cases like yours. When you partner with our team, we’ll provide you with a free consultation in which we can discuss the facts of your case and help you to understand your legal options.

Some clients opt to file for workers’ compensation or file a liability lawsuit against the company or companies who made the products that caused your illness, depending on the circumstances of their exposure.

Workers’ compensation pays for medical expenses associated with your disease if you were exposed to the toxic substance at your workplace. It also pays an ongoing weekly stipend to employees who are no longer able to work because of the disease.

If you are a surviving family member of someone who has died from peritoneal mesothelioma, then you may have grounds for a wrongful death claim, as well.

Some people choose to join a class-action lawsuit against large companies responsible for asbestos exposure. While this is a good way to get laws and regulations changed, it doesn’t necessarily help the victims or the families immediately.

Filing a lawsuit directly can help to ease the financial burden incurred by care. Liability lawsuits are generally filed against companies that are currently active, but there are options for receiving compensation from a bankrupt company, as well.

Asbestos Exposure Attorneys You Can Count On

Cases related to asbestos exposure can be complex. That’s why you need legal specialists like the skilled peritoneal mesothelioma lawyers at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma in Buffalo, Syracuse, or Rochester, NY, please contact us for a free and confidential evaluation.

Malignant Mesothelioma

Malignant mesothelioma is a cancerous form of mesothelioma with a low survival rate. It primarily affects the lungs, but can also affect the abdomen lining, heart lining, or testicles.

The New York State Department of Health classifies this as a rare disease, although there are approximately 200 new cases diagnosed in New York each year.

Malignant mesothelioma is caused by exposure to a fibrous mineral called asbestos, which was heavily used in construction, building materials, and mining operations through the late 1970s.

While many sites of heavy exposure exist in and around the Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, NY, areas, the symptoms of malignant mesothelioma can take over 20 years to appear.

The experienced malignant mesothelioma lawyers at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford are dedicated to focusing on helping victims who have been diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with this devastating condition, there is a limited window of time for action. Let us provide the help and support you need during this trying time.

What Is Malignant Mesothelioma?

When tumors are found in the body and determined to be cancerous, they’re referred to as malignant.

Malignant mesothelioma is a cancer of the lining of organs in your body. The most common form occurs in the lining of the lungs. The second most common form is when tumors develop in the lining of the abdomen itself, where most of your major organs are housed.

A rarer version of this disease occurs when tumors develop on the lining of the heart, while the rarest form occurs when tumors develop in the lining of the testicles.

Approximately 3,000 Americans discover they have malignant mesothelioma each year. Unfortunately, many of those people do not live more than 12 months after their diagnosis. Over 80% of patients die within five years.

Malignant mesothelioma has a low survival rate in part because it can take over 20 years for symptoms to appear.

Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

Malignant pleural mesothelioma happens when cancer develops in the lining of the lungs as a result of asbestos exposure. 75% of people diagnosed with mesothelioma have this type of condition.

Mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos, and much of that exposure comes through airborne dust and microparticles. When these particles are breathed in, they lodge in the lungs and become a long-term irritant that the body cannot absorb or discard.

Pleural malignant mesothelioma is too often mistaken for general lung cancer, even in people who have never smoked cigarettes.

Symptoms are similar, such as:

» A persistent cough

» Chest pain or heaviness

» Shortness of breath

» Trouble swallowing

» Fatigue and lethargy

» Unplanned weight loss

» Shoulder or upper back pain

If this type of malignant mesothelioma is discovered early enough, it may be treatable through surgery. Doctors may be able to remove tumors, remove the lining of the lungs, or remove the afflicted lung. Successful treatment may improve life expectancy by two to five years.

Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma is a cancer in the lining of your abdomen. The abdomen is a large cavity that houses the body’s primary organs, such as the liver, stomach, spleen, and intestines.

When malignant mesothelioma of the abdomen progresses into later stages, it can mean that one or more organs also have a cancerous mass.

Some of the ways this type of mesothelioma can manifest include:

» Abdominal distention and swelling

» Vomiting with or without blood

» Diarrhea with or without blood

» Nausea or loss of appetite

» General fatigue

» General stomach pain

As with other forms of malignant mesothelioma, peritoneal mesothelioma is caused by swallowing or breathing in minute particles of asbestos. This exposure can happen by working with asbestos products on a job site or by living near a manufacturer or mine.

Peritoneal mesothelioma is frequently misdiagnosed because it has symptoms that mimic many other disorders.

Some patients are diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome), Crohn’s disease, or similar digestive problems instead.

A wrong diagnosis can delay the appropriate treatment and dramatically shorten the patient’s life.

The experienced malignant mesothelioma lawyers at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC can review the facts of your case and determine whether you might have cause to a medical malpractice suit, which can help you to offset medical bills and lost time from work.

Malignant Testicular Mesothelioma

While rare, malignant mesothelioma can sometimes develop in the lining of the testicles. As with other forms of mesothelioma, this type of cancer can be overlooked or diagnosed.

The primary indications of a problem include inflammation of the testicle lining or swelling of the testes.

Malignant Pericardial Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma of the heart, or pericardial malignant mesothelioma, is quite rare. This is when tumors and cancerous cells develop in the lining of the heart.

When a patient is diagnosed with this version of the disease, they will not likely live another six months from the time of their diagnosis.

Unfortunately, the symptoms are quite generic—irregular heartbeat, heart palpitations, or heart murmur—and can make it easy for doctors to misdiagnose a patient.

Who Is Most Likely to Get Malignant Mesothelioma?

The only verifiable cause of this type of cancer is asbestos. Asbestos is a fibrous mineral favored in manufacturing because of its resistance to heat. It was extremely popular as an ingredient in a variety of building supplies and household products for decades.

Some of the myriad of products manufactured with asbestos include:

» Drywall

» Roof shingles

» Fire retardant spray

» Building insulation

» Pipe insulation

»   Electrical wiring

» Automobile brake pads

» Welding rods

» Fertilizer

» Weedkiller

»   Plastics and molding

Due to its extensive use in building materials, the majority of people who develop malignant mesothelioma from asbestos exposure are blue-collar workers and skilled tradespeople. Military veterans are another high-risk group, specifically those who worked on Navy ships or in Navy shipyards.

While the workers themselves were exposed to asbestos-laden products, their families were also exposed through secondary means.

When a person came home from work with asbestos dust all over their clothing, body, and hair, they easily transferred that harmful material to anyone else living in the household.

Secondary exposure has also happened to people who lived in neighborhoods that were within a mile or two of manufacturing or mining facilities. Notable local examples include North Tonawanda and Jefferson County, New York.

The malignant mesothelioma attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford help victims of malignant mesothelioma in Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, NY, every day, and we can be here for you, too.

Is Malignant Mesothelioma Treatable?

The treatment options used for malignant mesothelioma depend greatly on how far the cancer has advanced. The disease must first be accurately diagnosed, after which treatment options can be reviewed.

To diagnose malignant mesothelioma, a doctor may order a CT scan and X-ray to look for evidence of tumors inside the body. They may also take a biopsy, or a tissue sample, from the problem area.

Taking a tissue sample and testing it in a laboratory is the only way to accurately diagnose this disease. The diagnosis will also help to determine which stage of progression the patient is in.

Four Stages of Malignant Mesothelioma

Stage 1 of this disease has the longest survival rate because there are more treatment options available. When mesothelioma is discovered this early, it means the cancer has not had time to spread. Surgeons may be able to remove all visible tumors and provide the patient another five years of life.

Stage 2 occurs when mesothelioma has begun to spread. It has not spread too far yet, and surgery may still be an option if the patient is healthy enough to withstand treatment.

Surgery at this stage might entail removing part or all of the lining of the cancerous area or removing organs. Chemotherapy drugs may also be used in combination with a surgical treatment approach.

Most patients have already reached Stage 3 of their malignant mesothelioma by the time they are accurately diagnosed. This is a more advanced stage and surgery is not generally an option for patients at this point.

One or more chemotherapy drugs will likely be used to help slow the growth of new tumors. Sometimes, these medications can also help shrink existing tumors, which is why they’re used in combination with other treatment approaches.

In some cases, radiation is also used. This treatment uses lasers to kill the cancerous cells. While this treatment is painless, it will unfortunately also kill healthy cells.

Stage 4 of malignant mesothelioma happens when the cancer has spread through a large portion of the body. The only treatment at this point is to manage pain and help the patient live comfortably. Most patients in this stage live less than 12 months after diagnosis.

Free Malignant Mesothelioma Consultation

People who have malignant mesothelioma may qualify for substantial financial help if they act in time. The state of New York allows a victim to file for compensation up to three years after being diagnosed.

Since this disease progresses so fast, however, sometimes the legal action is left to surviving family members instead.

Victims and their families may qualify for workers’ compensation benefits. Workers’ comp is designed to compensate employees for injuries or illnesses that occurred on the job.

At Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, our skilled malignant mesothelioma lawyers know what it takes to pursue compensation for the condition using a variety of legal strategies. We even have a workers’ compensation specialist on staff who can help you recover medical bill costs if you were exposed at work.

Many other legal options exist. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma, please contact us today for a free and confidential evaluation.

Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma

Sarcomatoid mesothelioma, which is sometimes called spindle cell mesothelioma, accounts for less than 20% of all mesothelioma cases. Though the rarest form of mesothelioma, this is also the most lethal form of mesothelioma as it spreads very quickly throughout the body.

Sarcomatoid malignant mesothelioma has the worst outcomes after treatment and patients have median life expectancy rates of five to eight months after diagnosis.

This extremely brief time span makes it imperative for victims of this disease to contact the sarcomatoid mesothelioma lawyers at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford who specialize in cases in Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, NY.

What Is Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma?

Sarcomatoid mesothelioma is an extremely aggressive version of mesothelioma cancer that can spread itself quickly throughout the body. The cell shape sometimes mimics healthy cells; thus, it is often difficult to diagnose.

While this type of tumor can develop on the lining of the lungs, abdomen, heart, or testes, it is most often found in lungs. Occasionally, sarcomatous cell types will develop simultaneously with other mesothelioma cell types.

It accounts for less than 15% of pleural mesothelioma cases, and more than 80% of sufferers have had direct exposure to asbestos.

Like any other type of mesothelioma, sarcomatoid mesothelioma may incubate for 20 years or more before showing symptoms.

Who Is at Risk for Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma?

All types of mesotheliomas are known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. This is a natural mineral that has a fine fibrous texture that easily floats through the air.

Asbestos was a favored ingredient by manufacturers for decades because it was strong and heat resistant. It has been used in thousands of commercial and consumer products.

The majority of people who were exposed worked in a trade industry building or repairing homes and businesses. The bulk of building materials throughout several decades contained asbestos, thus workers were continually exposed even after manufacturers knew of the associated health risks.

Some of the asbestos products people worked with each day included:

» Electrical wires

» Pipe insulation

»   Plastic molding

» Welding materials

» Automotive brake pads

» Sheetrock and drywall

» Roofing materials

» Building insulation

»   Landscaping chemicals

» Plastics

» Caulks

Most of these products are used by skilled and unskilled laborers. The asbestos risk was particularly high for anyone who worked in a Navy shipyard or aboard a Navy sailing vessel as well because the government used asbestos products extensively.

An indirect result of exposure to military veterans and blue-collar workers was secondhand exposure for their loved ones. People who worked around these toxic materials often brought it home with them in the form of dust on their clothing and body.

Children hugged their fathers and spouses handled the clothing when washing it each week, thus exposing everyone in the home.

There are also established environmental exposure cases from people living too close to a manufacturing plant or mine. The Balmat mines in Jefferson County New York have caused one of the highest mesothelioma mortality rates in the entire country.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford specializes in getting sarcomatoid mesothelioma victims in Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, NY, the compensation they deserve.

Symptoms of Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma

The signs and symptoms of sarcomatous mesothelioma cells often don’t begin appearing for 20, 30, or even 40 years. Because of the way they can mimic normal cell structure, they’re often misdiagnosed or missed completely.

Symptoms are also similar to other health problems, which can exacerbate delays in treatment.

Some symptoms that may occur include:

» Difficulty breathing

» Pain or tightness in the chest

» Swelling of the abdomen

» Extra fluid around the lungs

» Loss of appetite

» Weight loss

» General fatigue

» Vomiting or nausea

Pleural sarcomatoid mesothelioma may have treatment options if it is discovered quickly enough. Because this variety spreads so quickly, however, it is unlikely that doctors will be able to surgically remove the tumors.

How Is It Diagnosed?

Since the sarcomatous cell disguises itself as a normal cell, it can be easily missed with standard testing. It’s also quite rare in comparison to other mesothelioma cell types, and the symptoms closely resemble other health problems.

When someone suffers from an incorrect diagnosis because a provider did not explore a patient’s medical history appropriately or failed to order tests, patients may have cause for a medical malpractice lawsuit.

Patients who know they’ve been exposed to asbestos and suspect they have mesothelioma often seek out second and third opinions from medical specialists. It can even be beneficial to find a physician who specializes in diagnosing and treating mesothelioma because they have more experience recognizing the different cell types.

Most doctors will order chest or abdomen X-rays and CT scans. These tests might show if there are cancerous growths on the lining of the lungs or abdomen. They’ll also show whether there is excess fluid on either lining, which is often an indicator of cancer cells developing.

Certain blood tests may help, as well, but the only definitive way to diagnose sarcomatoid mesothelioma is to look at the cells themselves. Doctors may biopsy a piece of tissue and extract fluid from the affected area so that they can look at them under a microscope and run additional tests.

These tests will show when mesothelioma cancer cells are present, and they will identify the spiral-shaped sarcomatous cells as well.

How Is It Treated?

The median time a patient will live after being diagnosed with sarcomatoid mesothelioma is about six months.

Because of the aggressive nature of this specific cell type, sarcomatoid mesothelioma is rarely treatable. There are four stages to the disease, and if a diagnosis is made by Stage 1 or 2, doctors may be able to help extend the patient’s life.

In Stage 1, sarcomatoid mesothelioma is located in a small section of the lung or another organ’s lining. This might be treated with surgery.

In Stage 2 of this disease, the sarcomatoid cell has expanded beyond the initial area of the lining. Treatment might involve the use of chemotherapy drugs if the doctor feels they may help.

In Stage 3, the sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma has spread to the other side of the lung lining and there is not much that can be done. Doctors may elect to try radiation therapy, but since this disease progresses so quickly, it may not help.

In Stage 4 of sarcomatoid mesothelioma, the cancer cells have spread liberally throughout the body. Treatment at this stage is simply a matter of keeping the patient comfortable and as pain-free as possible.

How Can Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford Help?

If you have been diagnosed with sarcomatoid mesothelioma, you may have a solid case against the employer or manufacturer who exposed you to asbestos. With an extremely short survival time frame, however, retribution steps may need to be finished by the family of the person afflicted.

In the state of New York, a victim or the victim’s family has just three years to file a workers’ compensation or wrongful death lawsuit for sarcomatoid mesothelioma cancer.

Workers’ compensation is insurance afforded to all employees in the state of New York who have been injured or made ill because of their job.

People who get cancer because they handled asbestos products at work have been injured. The benefits from this program will pay related medical bills and expenses. It may also pay for funeral costs or provide a weekly income to the victim or their surviving family.

When a person dies as a result of sarcomatoid mesothelioma, their family may have a valid claim against the company who manufactured the asbestos products. While some companies have since gone bankrupt due to their outrageous conduct against employees, there may still be options for a victim’s family.

Other companies are still in business and still producing toxic products that people use in the workforce or at home every day. Some of the ways you might still be exposed today include:

» Baby powder

» Cosmetic face powder

» Cosmetic blush

» Spray paint

» Wood putty

» Non-stick agents in cookware

» Automotive plastics

» Tableware

The experienced sarcomatoid mesothelioma lawyers at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, have helped to bring closure to many families who have suffered at the hands of companies making products with asbestos.

We even have a dedicated workers’ compensation attorney to help you file your claim and collect the benefits you’re entitled to.

We have spent decades focusing solely on mesothelioma cases, so you don’t have to face this struggle alone. Our specialty is helping clients in Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester, NY, to collect the compensation that is rightfully theirs, while also striving to change the laws and regulations against this toxic material.

We have a personal interest in making these changes, too. We have dedicated our practice to this because our families have been directly affected by exposure to toxic materials. Combined, we have secured billions of dollars in compensation for mesothelioma victims, and we’d like to help you as well.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with malignant sarcomatoid mesothelioma, please contact us for a free and confidential evaluation.

Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer

Asbestos-related lung cancer is caused by inhaling asbestos fibers. It has been known since the mid-1930’s that asbestos exposure can cause lung cancer. The two forms of asbestos-related lung cancer are small cell and non-small cell lung cancer.

Cigarettes or other tobacco products may also play a role in causing lung cancer. If you were exposed to asbestos and smoked cigarettes, your chances of contracting lung cancer are greatly increased. Smoking interferes with the lungs ability to remove asbestos fibers.

Lung cancer caused by asbestos exposure is a latent disease, meaning the timeframe from your exposure to asbestos to the development of your lung cancer can range from 15 to 50 years. For example, you may have been exposed to asbestos in the 1960’s and developed lung cancer caused by asbestos today.

If detected early, the lung cancer tumor can be successfully removed during surgery by either a lobectomy or wedge resection in which the surgeon removes a portion of your lung that contains the cancerous tumor.

Chemotherapy or radiation have also been helpful in shrinking lung cancer tumors, although these cancer treatments have side effects.

Most recently, immunotherapy, with the drug Keytruda, has been shown to shrink lung cancer tumors, without harsh side effects.

If you or a loved one was exposed to asbestos and diagnosed with lung cancer, please call the experienced attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC.

How Asbestos Can Cause Lung Cancer

Asbestos-related lung cancer generally takes between 15 to 50 years to develop after exposure to asbestos. Asbestos-related lung cancer is a latent disease, and most cases are caused by occupational exposure to asbestos.

At-risk occupations include plant workers, construction workers, pipefitters, electricians, veterans, shipbuilders, and many other types of workers.

When a person breathes in asbestos fibers, these tiny fibers become stuck in the person’s lungs. Over time, these microscopic fibers can become cancerous. Sometimes, prior to the onset of lung cancer, these asbestos fibers irritate and scar the lung tissue. This condition, known as asbestosis, makes the lungs stiff and causes difficulty breathing.

The Modern Threat of Asbestos Exposure

These days, we know better. By 2003, lung cancer and mesothelioma had become household terms and the world became well aware of the dangers of asbestos. As a result, heavy regulations were established to protect public health.

Unfortunately, these regulations didn’t go so far as to ban the substance entirely. To this day, there is no asbestos ban in the United States.

Asbestos is the leading cause of work-related deaths worldwide. More than 90,000 people die from asbestos exposure each year. It is expected that the mortality rate is going to continue to increase in industrial areas.

»   Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer Risk Factors

» Smoking history

» Amount of time working with asbestos

» Amount of asbestos worked with

» Genetics

The Industries with High Asbestos Exposure Rates

No amount of asbestos exposure is considered safe. However, we are all exposed to low levels of asbestos in the air we breathe every day. Ambient or background air usually contains between 10 and 200 asbestos fibers in every 1000 liters (or cubic meter) of air (equivalent to 0.01 to 0.20 fibers per liter of air). Luckily, the levels of asbestos in the air are low and generally do not cause sickness.

In the late 1800s and throughout the 1900s, the material was used to create bricks, pipes, cement, and insulation. Its fireproof quality also made it the go-to material for safety coatings. As a society, we were so confident in the reliability of asbestos that even women and children participated in its mining and production.

The majority of people who contract asbestos-related diseases, such as lung cancer, worked jobs that caused them to breathe in large amounts of asbestos. Some of these occupations include the following:

» Factory Workers

»   Electricians

» Union workers

» Firefighters

» Shipyard workers

» Construction workers

»   Building inspectors

» Miners

» Demolition crews

» Navy veterans

Asbestos was used so widely for so long that the list of at-risk industries could go on for pages. In fact, even farmers and engineers have a moderate risk of exposure.

At Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC we have worked with asbestos-affected clients from all walks of life.

How Regulations Protect U.S. Workers

OSHA has many regulations in place to prevent asbestos exposure in the workplace. The EPA also has regulatory authority and uses it to protect state and local employees who are not under an OSHA-approved safety plan.

Overall, the list of asbestos-related regulations is quite extensive. Below, are a few activities that should never take place in an area where asbestos exposure is possible:

» Eating

» Drinking

»   Smoking

» Dry sweeping

» Shoveling

Additionally, an employer must ensure that workers who are likely to be exposed to asbestos wear a protective layer. This outerwear must be removed and either cleaned or thrown away each day. When a worker handles asbestos-containing materials, an approved respirator must also be worn.

Failure to enforce any of these guidelines can make an employer liable for a worker’s injuries and illnesses.

How Asbestos Exposure Can Occur at Home

Encountering asbestos in your home is less likely than encountering it on a job site. Still, it is possible to become sick from asbestos in a domestic setting.

If your home was built before the 1980s, be aware. Any work that disturbs affected materials may cause the asbestos to become airborne.

Asbestos materials were used heavily in construction until the 1980s. So, if your home is on the older side, everything from your asphalt shingles to your cement foundation could be affected.

Even in newer homes, there are over a dozen home-building applications in which asbestos is still legal in the U.S.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC has seen countless home-exposure cases throughout the years. Typically, exposure happens when a homeowner performs any of these tasks:

» Renovating an attic

» Removing popcorn ceilings

» Drilling into old drywall

» Cleaning the brakes of a classic car in the garage

» Scraping out old vinyl tiles

If you are planning to work on an older home, you may be best off hiring a professional contractor. At the very least, we recommend you wear protective clothing throughout the remodel.

Common Effects of Asbestos Exposure

Unfortunately, asbestos illnesses don’t present symptoms immediately. In fact, it can take 15 to 60 years for symptoms to appear.

Asbestos is a known human carcinogen. That means it is proven to cause cancer. The most common form of asbestos-related cancer is mesothelioma. This is a rare illness that affects the lining of an infected person’s abdomen and chest.

According to the International Agency for Research, asbestos is also known to cause or increase the risk for these types of cancer:

» Lung

» Ovary

» Larynx

»   Colorectal

» Pharynx

» Stomach

Cancer is the most common asbestos-related illness, but there are other threats to be aware of, such as asbestosis, which can lead to permanent lung damage and cause breathing problems.

Here is a list of the other asbestos-related injuries and illnesses to be aware of:

»   Nonmalignant lung disorders

»   Pleural thickening

»   Benign pleural effusions

Any of these conditions, cancerous or not, can lead to expensive medical bills and a decreased life expectancy. If you find yourself in this kind of situation, it may be time to consider your legal options.

Your Legal and Financial Options with Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer

Because mesothelioma has a long latency period, some people who were exposed to asbestos in the ‘80s and ‘90s are only now receiving a diagnosis.

If you have recently been diagnosed with lung cancer, mesothelioma, or any other asbestos-related disease, you may be looking for support.

The experienced legal team at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC is here to guide you through your legal and financial options.

We have worked with many victims of asbestos and know just how devastating these diseases can be. Most times, workers who were exposed to asbestos received no warning about its dangers.

Taking Advantage of Asbestos Trust Funds

More than $30 billion have been allocated to asbestos trust funds. Many manufacturers of asbestos products have declared bankruptcy. In these cases, they were ordered to set money aside for compensating past, current, and future victims as a condition of the agreement.

This money sits in a trust fund until it is needed by individual victims, like you. If you have questions about asbestos trust funds, give us a call. Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC can help you get the compensation you deserve.

Connecting with Veteran Affairs to Receive Benefits

Some service members are exposed to asbestos while in the line of duty. If you fall into this group, you may qualify for benefits provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

The VA may offer you access to world-class healthcare, as well as financial support. It can also be a great resource for the family members of veterans.

Filing a Lawsuit

You may decide to pursue a lawsuit or settlement. This is a common choice for people who want to receive compensation for their injuries and illnesses.

The first step is to determine who is at fault for your condition. Some asbestos manufacturers made a conscious choice to continue endangering the public, despite knowing full-well the dangers of the material.

New York State imposes strict limitations to file a claim. The statute of limitations for a personal injury action based on asbestos exposure and disease requires that an action be commenced within three years of the date of diagnosis. In the case of death, an action for wrongful death must be filed within two years of the date of death or the claim is barred. However, the statute of limitations often depends on the particular facts of your case. Time is of the essence, which is why it is important to contact an attorney as soon as possible.

Trust the legal team at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC to help you hold these types of organizations responsible.

How The Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer Attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford Can Help

If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer, you should contact an attorney as soon as possible to learn what your legal rights are for compensation from the companies that negligently exposed you to asbestos.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have been representing workers and their families with lung cancer for over thirty-five years. We have a full team of lawyers devoted to representing people exposed to asbestos with lung cancer.

If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer, please contact us today and we will schedule an appointment to come to your home and meet with you and your family to explain your legal rights.

Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure

Home exposure, also known as secondary asbestos exposure or para-occupational exposure, occurs as an indirect result of working with or around asbestos materials. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous products used in both the manufacturing and construction industries. Asbestos can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer to develop years after initial exposure to asbestos dust and fibers. Home exposure generally occurred in the home, and when wives and children came into close contact with their husbands, fathers and brothers who were covered in asbestos-laden dust from the workplace.

At Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, our attorneys assist clients in filing third-party mesothelioma and lung cancer lawsuits against the companies that wrongfully failed to warn against the hazards of asbestos exposure. It is important to act quickly in order to avoid having your claim disqualified by the statute of limitations. It is even more important to act quickly so that your case can be heard and decided before you become too ill to participate. In addition to third-party lawsuits, our attorneys can also assist you in filing claims for Veterans’ Benefits, Workers’ Compensation and Social Security Disability benefits.

If you are struggling in these kinds of circumstances, you don’t have to navigate the legal system alone.

New York has one of the highest rates of asbestos disease in the nation. As a result, our attorneys have become highly skilled in handling second-hand asbestos exposure cases. We’ve helped countless clients in situations just like yours.

Of course, we know that second-hand exposure can be hard to prove. Trust our team to start at the beginning and identify the liable parties. From there, we can help you pursue compensation.

Our attorneys are committed to our clients, and we will see your case through to completion. We do not refer cases to other law firms, and we have a track record of achieving success for thousands of our clients and their families. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, contact us today for a free and confidential case evaluation.

How Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure Happens

Asbestos fibers are extremely small and light and capable of being transported home on a worker’s clothing, hair, and footwear. Because of non-existent or inadequate warnings on a variety of asbestos-containing materials used in many different industries, many individuals were exposed to asbestos prior to the late 1970s. Most often, women and children inhaled asbestos fibers that were brought home on the clothing of a family member who had direct daily contact with asbestos-containing materials. When wives and children came into close contact with their family members who were covered in asbestos-laden dust from the workplace, they had no idea that this dust could cause them harm.

Even the relatively slight exposure involved in shaking out work clothes before doing laundry is enough to cause mesothelioma to develop years after initial exposure. Medical literature contains many examples of stay-at-home spouses contracting mesothelioma by washing work clothes. Children of exposed workers may also contract mesothelioma as a result of asbestos contamination originating from the workplace.

In 2000, a summary review of mesothelioma from defined environmental exposures was published. It demonstrated that the overall summary risk estimate for mesothelioma for persons with household exposures was 8.1 times higher than that of unexposed persons.

Once asbestos gets into the home, it can remain in the home permanently. Asbestos gets into the rugs, curtains, and bedding, and it can become suspended by movement. Family members may then be exposed to asbestos twenty-four hours a day rather than partial exposure, which occurs in the workplace. Asbestos has no warning qualities; members of a household could have substantial exposure to asbestos without knowing they have been exposed.

Second-hand asbestos exposure can be just as deadly as direct exposure. In a study of 90 women with mesothelioma (a cancer caused by asbestos), 64% were made sick by secondhand exposure.

Any time a child or young adult becomes sick from asbestos, second-hand exposure is the most likely cause. So how does it happen?

The usual suspects are construction workers, farmers, or asbestos professionals. When these individuals or their employers fail to follow regulatory protocols, they endanger the public. Leaving the workplace with asbestos-laced clothing can cause the material to become airborne.

Below, we’ve broken down who is at risk of second-hand exposure and how it happens in the first place. As always, you can let Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford LLC can answer any questions you have.

Who Is at Risk for Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure?

Today asbestos exposure happens much less frequently than it did 20 years ago. But because many countries, including the United States, do not have a total ban on the substance, exposure is still a risk. In fact, the world sees about 255,000 deaths due to asbestos each year.

Of course, only a percentage of those deaths happen as the result of second-hand exposure. Still, it’s important to understand how deadly asbestos can be in any scenario. It is currently the leading cause of work-related deaths worldwide.

The people who are most vulnerable to second-hand exposure are those who share a household with someone who works with asbestos.

Workers from any of these fields may encounter asbestos:

» Shipbuilding and repair

» Manufacturing

» Firefighting

» Construction

» Coal mining

» Asphalt installation

» Factory Workers

If these workers aren’t wearing a protective layer and then removing that layer once they’re done, they may carry asbestos particles home with them. Anyone who shares the living space, including spouses, children, and elderly parents, may become exposed.

Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure: How It Happens

Asbestos is made up of fibers that become airborne when disturbed. That’s why construction workers are particularly vulnerable to exposure.

As they hammer, demolish, and otherwise disrupt old building materials, they cause asbestos particles to enter the air.

When these workers come home with asbestos on their person, they introduce the material to the living space. The following activities are often the culprits for second-hand asbestos exposure.

Washing Laundry

It is very difficult to wash asbestos out of clothing. In fact, when you launder clothing that is covered in asbestos, exposure is the only thing you’re likely to accomplish.

If you do encounter asbestos-laced clothing, the best option is to dispose of the garment safely.

To dispose of affected clothing, place it in a clearly labeled container or bag. Then, take it to a landfill that is built to handle asbestos waste.

Sitting on Furniture

When an exposed worker comes home and sits on the couch, asbestos fibers may become embedded in the upholstery. Likewise, dining room chairs, beds, and benches can become affected.

Embracing Another Person

Naturally, the greatest risk of second-hand exposure comes from person-to-person contact. If one of these workers comes home with asbestos-ladened clothing, he may expose anyone with a hug, handshake, or clap on the back.

Of course, one instance of exposure in this way is not likely to pose a significant health risk. But if you live with a person who brings home asbestos day after day, year after year, you could become ill.

The Health Risks of Second-Hand Exposure to Asbestos

You probably know that second-hand smoke can be just as dangerous as smoking. Similarly, second-hand exposure to asbestos is just as dangerous as direct exposure. In fact, the list of possible injuries and illnesses is exactly the same between the two scenarios.

When you encounter asbestos, directly or indirectly, you become at risk for these health conditions:

» Pleural plaques

» Asbestosis

» Lung cancer

»   Lung scarring

»   Mesothelioma

While each of these conditions can be treated, there is no cure for mesothelioma. The average life expectancy after a mesothelioma diagnosis is 4 to 18 months. As you may imagine, these patients acquire mounting medical bills from day one.

If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, several factors will play into your prognosis, including, your age, gender, and health. Additionally, the stage and location of the cancer will impact the life expectancy provided. Of course, no two patients are the same and there is always cause for hope.

At Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, we understand that the diagnosis of an asbestos-related illness or injury is devastating. We want to support you by pursuing the compensation you deserve. Money doesn’t solve everything, but it can lighten your load during this difficult time.

The Average Cost of Care for Asbestos Exposure

Treatment for asbestos-related diseases can be very costly.

For many mesothelioma patients, the monthly cost of treatment is approximately $8,200. That’s assuming that the doctor orders surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Of course, with insurance, the out-of-pocket costs will be much smaller. Still, the fees are just another burden for people who are already suffering.

Unfortunately, medical bills are just the tip of the iceberg for some patients. If you are ill, you may need to take time away from work, hire a caregiver, or pay for a cleaner. And when the treatment center is located far from your home, you may also have to pay for transportation and lodging.

Fortunately, an experienced lawyer can help you obtain needed compensation. Depending on the specifics of your case, there are many asbestos trust funds that offer payouts for victims of asbestos, and/or recovery through a lawsuit.

How Do We Determine Liability?

You may already have an idea of who is liable for your asbestos-related illness, or you may need our help getting to the root of the problem. Either way, it’s important to know that proving liability is sometimes easier said than done.

The most likely culprit is an asbestos manufacturer. There is evidence that many of these companies knew about the dangers of asbestos and withheld warnings to workers and consumers.

If you are a victim of secondhand exposure, these companies still have liability for your illness or injury.

In order to win a case or obtain a settlement, we must be able to prove the other party was negligent.

To support the claim that your illness was caused by the other party’s negligence, we may need to acquire some background information. Specifically, our team will want to know how often, how long, and how closely you were exposed to asbestos.

How We Will Prepare for Your Claim or Settlement

In some cases, it may be necessary to file a mass tort or class action lawsuit in Buffalo, Rochester, or Syracuse. This is necessary when more than one individual is affected by another party’s negligence. If multiple people become ill with asbestos-related illnesses, they may decide to file claims as a group.

Trust Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford to evaluate and discuss your legal options with you. We will help you decide how to best prepare for your case. From deposition to settlement, our team will be with you every step of the way.

Call for Your Free Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure Consultation

We would love to provide a free and confidential consultation during this trying time. If you have any questions about a potential case or settlement, we are here to address them. Simply give us a call to get the process started.

Because our firm has been in business since 1995, you can trust us to offer proven legal guidance. Reach out to the trusted team at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford today.

Exposure to asbestos has been recognized as the cause of mesothelioma for nearly 60 years. While many cases of mesothelioma result from occupational exposure, mesothelioma can also result from environmental asbestos exposure. Environmental asbestos exposure occurs in neighborhoods surrounding industrial facilities that used or processed substantial amounts of raw asbestos fibers.

Environmental Asbestos Exposure

For those living near an asbestos source, the magnitude of increased mesothelioma risk depends on proximity to the emission site and the rate and quantity of asbestos emitted, weather conditions and prevailing wind direction. For instance, high asbestos emission levels at the Durez plant in North Tonawanda, New York, between 1959 and 1978 have resulted in several cases of mesothelioma among neighborhood residents.

Approximately 76 former Durez employees have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, and at least five cases of mesothelioma have been reported among the community of people living or working near Durez. Because malignant mesothelioma is a rare disease, the unusually high incidence of mesothelioma among Durez workers demonstrates that they are at a greatly increased risk of developing the disease. Increased mesothelioma risk among the Durez workforce also confirms evidence that environmental asbestos exposure is the cause of mesothelioma among nearby residents.

Durez mixed raw asbestos with other materials to strengthen the plastic molding compound it manufactured. This was an extremely dusty process, and dust collectors were used to siphon off dust from the mixers. The dust collectors were not effective, however, and asbestos dust escaped into the surrounding neighborhood. Air currents disseminated the asbestos dust throughout the community, where it settled on residents’ homes, lawns, cars, and swimming pools.

According to industrial hygiene and epidemiological studies, air currents have the ability to carry asbestos far distances depending on the strength and pattern of the wind. Therefore, even residents who live significant distances from an asbestos source can have an elevated risk of mesothelioma caused by environmental exposure. For example, studies have reported a significantly elevated risk among women living around facilities that used crocidolite, and as far as 1.5 miles if their residence was in the direction of prevailing winds.

Environmental asbestos exposure also increases the risk of developing mesothelioma for those living near a source of naturally occurring asbestos. This is the case in Jefferson County, New York, where naturally occurring asbestos formations exist throughout talc deposits.

These deposits, known as the Balmat mines, were actively mined from 1968 to 1981 by International Talc Co., later known as Gouverneur Talc. As a result of the mining of these naturally occurring asbestos formations, residents of Jefferson County near the mines were environmentally exposed to asbestos. Jefferson County has continually had one of the highest mortality rates for mesothelioma in the United States, and the mesothelioma rate is now five to ten times the background rate, among the general population.

Environmental exposure to asbestos from living or working near facilities like Durez or near mines like the Balmat mines put many residents in these communities at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The strength of a claim involving environmental exposure depends, in part, on ruling out other exposures to asbestos or agents that cause cancer. If you worked at a steel mill or in a similar occupation where you were exposed to asbestos and also lived near an industrial site where asbestos was used, both exposures would likely factor into the cause of your disease. These companies knew about the dangers of asbestos long before the rest of the world. They endangered many lives with their silence and are now being held responsible.

At Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, we have worked with many victims of asbestos exposure. If you bring your case to our team, you can trust us to handle it with care, knowledge, and experience.

If you or a loved one believe you were environmentally exposed to asbestos and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Understanding How Symptoms Present

Asbestos-related illnesses have a long latency period. So, when symptoms do begin to present themselves, it’s wise to see a doctor immediately before the situation worsens.

Some of the symptoms of mesothelioma to watch out for include:

» Chest or lower-back pain

» Difficulty breathing

» Coughing

» Difficulty swallowing

» Face or arm swelling

Mesothelioma is one of the most dangerous consequences of asbestos exposure. If you suspect you have been exposed in the past and begin to experience these symptoms, call a doctor right away.

Other diseases that stem from environmental asbestos exposure include lung cancer, lung scarring, and pleural disease. Each of these conditions requires extensive treatment.

How Are Environmental Asbestos Exposure Related Illnesses Treated

There is a long list of treatment options for victims of asbestos exposure. The primary goal is always to help a patient continue breathing without distress. To reach that goal, your care provider may recommend any of these treatments:

» Oxygen therapy

» Inhalers

»   Medications like bronchodilators

»   Postural drainage

» Humidifiers

And if your illness is cancerous, you may also require surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. Needless to say, these treatments are expensive. And if you are also forced to take time away from work, the bills may become too much to handle.

If you find yourself in this situation, you may wonder where to turn for compensation. If your exposure was environmental, can you file a claim or lawsuit?

Get in touch with Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford. We have provided an overview of your legal options below. But if you want specific answers, it’s best to get in touch with us directly.

Can You Be Compensated for Environmental Asbestos Exposure?

Occupational asbestos exposure is on the decline, but some studies indicate that environmental exposure is on the rise in some areas. Our hope is that, by spreading awareness about the risk of environmental asbestos, we can help to correct the problem.

We are also committed to aiding the current victims of this type of exposure. When there is not a clearly responsible party for your toxic exposure, you may wonder whether you can receive compensation at all.

Thankfully, there are legal options available to you, even if a lawsuit or settlement doesn’t apply. Asbestos trust funds are one option. These trust funds are established when asbestos manufacturers go bankrupt. There is enough money in these funds to provide for current and future mesothelioma patients. Give us a call to discuss asbestos trust funds and whether you are eligible for compensation.

When Should You Call Our Office?

As soon as you receive a diagnosis for asbestos-related illnesses, call our office. In the state of New York, there is a statute of limitations for these kinds of claims. You have three years from the date of diagnosis to file an asbestos lawsuit. And if a loved one has died from asbestos, the statute of limitations is two years from the date of death.

If your case is eligible, a lawsuit or settlement may be in your best interest. It’s a good idea to call our legal team as soon as possible so we can get the process started.

What to Expect from Your Free Consultation

We hope you have found the information we’ve provided helpful. Of course, we can offer more help to victims who reach out to us directly. If you have questions about asbestos law, environmental exposure, or how a victim can receive compensation, reach out to our experienced legal team today.

You should know that all meetings with our team are completely confidential. And your first consultation will be free.

At this consultation, we will ask relevant questions so we can begin to understand your situation and where you were exposed to asbestos. From there, we can help you understand the legal options available to you.

Give us a call or visit our contact page to get in touch. We serve clients from Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and the surrounding areas.

Talcum powder has been a staple in households across the United States for decades, but this seemingly harmless powder has been linked to cancer when it contains asbestos.

Talc & Asbestos Exposure

What Is Talcum Powder?

Talc is a clay mineral made up of hydrated magnesium silicate and oxygen mined from the rock deposits in the earth. Manufacturers crush, dry and mill talc into a fine, soft white powder called talcum powder. As a powder, talc easily absorbs moisture, prevents caking, and aids in keeping skin dry in order to prevent rashes. The talcum powder adds softness and shine to products, which makes it a common ingredient in cosmetics. Talc is also used as a thickening agent and lubricant and is also an ingredient in many industrial products including paint and joint compound (mud).

Some talc, in its natural form, contains asbestos, which is a known carcinogen. Exposure to asbestos may cause mesothelioma or lung cancer. Many talc deposits are contaminated with asbestos due to their proximity to tremolite mines. Tremolite is a type of asbestos.

Baby powder represents the cornerstone of the Johnson & Johnson baby products franchise; and they have a large investment in a talc mine. Despite this, they knew it would be very bad for business if it became known that talc contained asbestos. Yet, an article by Drs. Hughes and Kalmer appeared in June 1966 American Journal of Diseases of Children that states:

“In conclusion, it is strongly urged that talcum powder be removed from the environment of children and the traditional association of talcum powder and babies be abandoned. It has no medicinal value; wherever placed it serves as a foreign body; and at least three deaths and an unknown morbidity have resulted from this silicate powder.”

ASBESTOS – THERE IS NO SAFE LEVEL

In 1972 the OSHA regulations were put in place in the Federal register, in the law, and asbestos was the very first substance regulated by OSHA. There was recognition that this substance, while it wouldn’t hurt the vast majority of people exposed to it, was so dangerous that we had to protect our people.

OSHA is not the only organization that recognizes the dangers of asbestos. Organizations worldwide have quantified and agreed that THERE IS NO SAFE LEVEL OF EXPOSURE to ANY TYPE OF ASBESTOS. These companies include:

NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

United States Public Health Service

United States Environmental Protection Agency

World Health Organization

American Thoracic Society

National Cancer Institute

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

CFTA (Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrances Association, now known as the Personal Care Products Council or PCPC);

U.S. Department of Commerce, Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare Center for Disease Control.

It is the position of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the American Thoracic Society, among others, that microscopic structures of amphibole and serpentine minerals that are asbestiform and meet the size definition of PCM fibers, should be counted as asbestos, regardless of the manner by which they were formed.

The U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Reports Library published an Industrial Hygiene Study of the Gouverneur Talc Company, Number One Mine and Mill in Balmat, New York. The report was prepared by John M. Dement and Ralph D. Zumwalde and published on June 8, 1977. The survey was conducted November 3-7, 1975. The final report states that, “Analysis of the impinger samples revealed excessive exposure to asbestos at almost every mine and mill operation. The authors conclude that excessive exposures to airborne fibers exist in both mine and mill.” Jefferson County, which is just south of the area where the mines were located and where many of the miners lived, has continually had one of the highest mortality rates for mesothelioma in the United States over the past fifty years. Males in this community had the sixth-highest mesothelioma mortality rate in the nation during a period in time when the Balmat mines were extremely active (1968-1981). The mesothelioma mortality rate for women during this time period was the second-highest in the nation. Since the early 1980’s, the mesothelioma rate has increased to the point that it is now five to ten times the background rate.

Talcum Powder and Mesothelioma:

Mesothelioma is a deadly cancer caused exclusively by asbestos exposure and strikes an average of 3,200 U.S. residents per year, most dying within a couple of years of diagnosis. Most victims have had identifiable workplace exposures, but others appear to have had little or no contact with asbestos apart from alleged exposure through years of using talc-based powders and cosmetics.

Cosmetic Talc Products (partial list, not limited to the following):

» Angel of Mine Baby Powder

» Assured Shower & Bath Absorbent Body Powder

» Bauer and Black Baby Talc

»  Cashmere Bouquet Body Talc

» Clubman Talcum Powder

» Coco Chanel After Bath Powder

» Coty Airspun Face Powder

» CVS Brand Baby Powder

» Desert Flower Dusting Powder

» English Leather After Shave Talc

» Faberge Brut Talc

» Face Powders, including but not limited to, pressed powders, loose mineral powders, matte pressed powders, powder bronzers, shimmery face powders

»   Family Dollar Mild Baby Powder

» Friendship Garden talcum powder

» Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder®

» Mennen Shave Talc

» NARS Blush

» N.Y.C. New York Color Cheek Glow Powder Blush

» Old Spice Talcum Powder

» Rosemary Talc

» Shower to Shower Body Powder

» Valeant Pharmaceuticals’ Shower to Shower®

» Yardley Invisible Talc

» Yardley Black Label Baby Powder

» ZBT Baby Powder with Baby Oil

Industrial Uses of Talc:

» Paint – spray paint, high heat paint, semi-gloss paints, waterproofing paint, latex paint – Paints: an anti-corrosive, to produce matting and to prevent cracking.

» Joint Compounds, wood putty.

»   Export, refractories, insecticides and miscellaneous uses.

» Ceramics (including automotive catalytic converters) and clays, catalysts and tiles: as a flux and to control thermal expansion – particularly in catalysts and particulate filters.

» Paper and papermaking: to improve paper smoothness, water retention in certain papers, and printability and runnability for coated papers.

» Rubber.

» Roofing and Asphalt shingles: for back surfacing and to prevent sticking in storage.

» Additives in foods: an anti-sticking agent.

» Animal feed: to prevent caking and improve the press-ability of pellets.

» Body powder, makeup and soaps: inert, soft and fragrance-retentive.

» Cables: to improve electrical insulation and flame retardancy.

» Fertilizers: to prevent caking and lengthen storage periods.

» Glazes: to improve thermal expansion and fusion.

» Olive oil processing: to improve oil extraction.

» Paper and papermaking: to improve paper smoothness, water retention in certain papers, and printability and runnability for coated papers.

» Pesticides: a carrier and dilutant.

» Pharmaceuticals: as an excipient or lubricant.

» Plastics, particularly automotive parts: to increase dimensional stability and stiffness.

» Rubber hoses, membranes, sealings, stoppers and tires: to improve tear and tensile properties, and the flow in molding.

» Sanitaryware: to improve gloss and whiteness.

» Tableware: to enable shorter firing cycles.

» Wires: to improve electrical insulation and flame retardancy.

Many regulatory agencies, including The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a part of the world Health Organization (WHO), classifies asbestos-containing talc as “carcinogenic to humans.” The CTFA (Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrances Association, now known as the Personal Care Products Council [PCPC]) issued voluntary guidelines in 1976, warning all talc used in cosmetic products in the U.S. should be free from detectable amounts of asbestos.

Asbestos-contaminated talc is hazardous and exposure to it can be attributed to an industrial or cosmetic source.

Manufacturers of Talc and Talcum Powder

There are several manufacturers of Talcum powder. They include:

» Johnson & Johnson (most well-known) which is now owned by Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc., now known as Bausch Health Companies, Inc.

» Whittaker Clark & Daniels.

» Colgate-Palmolive Company.

» Imerys Talc Supplier.

» Mineral Technologies, Inc.

» IMI Fabi SpA.

» Golcha Group.

» Angel of Mine Baby Powder.

» Anti-Monkey Butt Powder.

» Assured Shower & Bath Absorbent Body Powder.

» Store brands including CVS Brand Baby Powder, Family Dollar Mild Baby Powder, and Rite Aid Baby Powder.

Talcum Powder Lawsuits

Johnson & Johnson faces thousands of lawsuits contending that the use of its talc powders for feminine hygiene caused ovarian cancer. In a 2018 Missouri case, a jury found that Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products gave 22 women cancer, resulting in a record-setting 2.1 billion verdict.

In December 2019, Johnson & Johnson agreed to settle a mesothelioma case, where the expert had reported finding traces of asbestos in Johnson & Johnson Products. Johnson & Johnson knew their products contained asbestos. In fact, in 2019, Johnson & Johnson recalled 33,000 bottles of Johnson’s Baby Powder after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration found asbestos in a sample it tested. In May 2020, the company announced it would stop selling talc-based baby powder in the United States and Canada. The decision came after juries awarded billions of dollars to people who said talcum powder products gave them ovarian cancer or mesothelioma.

Going forward, the judicial system will likely put emphasis on mesothelioma and cosmetic talc cases as the first to go to trial once the trial courts slowly resume, as plaintiffs stricken with mesothelioma seek to get cases in front of a jury before their health deteriorates further.

On Monday, April 19, 2021, A California jury handed down a $4.8 million verdict against talc supplier Whittaker Clark & Daniels after connecting the company to a 78-year-old man’s mesothelioma diagnosis. Mr. Willie McNeal Jr., a Vietnam War veteran represented by the Simon Greenstone Panatier law firm, suffers from pleural mesothelioma, convinced a jury to link his diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma to his daily use of Old Spice Talcum Powder for 22 years. According to the trial testimony, Whittaker Clark & Daniels’ North Carolina talc mine is known to have asbestos contamination. The verdict included $3 million in punitive damages.

The trial of Linda Zimmerman, represented by Attorney Leah Kagen at the Simon Greenstone Panatier law firm, opened in April 2021 in Los Angeles County Superior Court. Zimmerman’s lawsuit was filed against numerous defendants who manufactured asbestos-laden products after she was diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2018. The retired California teacher used Johnson’s baby powder from 1954 to 2018, a brand called Jean Naté from 1956 to 1992, Avon Unforgettable from 1964 to the 1980s, and Chanel No. 5 powder from 1964 to 2009. The defendant in the case is Whittaker Clark & Daniels, the talc supplier to beauty products companies Avon, Revlon and Chanel.

Whittaker has been named in other talc lawsuits, including a 2016 case in Los Angeles Superior Court that resulted in an $18 million jury verdict. That suit was brought by Philip Depoian and his wife, represented by the Simon Greenstone Panatier firm, who accused the company of being partly responsible for his May 2015 diagnosis for mesothelioma. Depoian retired in 2007, and claimed he was exposed to asbestos-containing talc products because of his father’s job at a barbershop and through his use of various talc-based men’s products. Whittaker was also named as a defendant in a recently-filed case in New York State court that also targeted Revlon, with spouses alleging that she developed mesothelioma from asbestos in its talc products and that she was exposed to asbestos through her father’s employment with the cosmetics company. Another cosmetic talc trial involving Johnson & Johnson is set to begin later in April 2021 in Alameda County, with another case potentially going to trial later in the summer of 2021 in St. Louis, Missouri.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing talc used in industrial products and in cosmetic products. If you or a loved one has developed mesothelioma or lung cancer as a result of exposure to talcum powder, we can help you obtain financial compensation for your injury. We urge you to contact us today regarding your legal rights.

Including Mesothelioma and Lung Cancer Railroad Injury or Illness:

These workers were at risk for injury due to accidents, derailments, collisions and faulty equipment. Due to their exposure to asbestos and diesel exhaust, railroad workers are also. Railroad workers faced dangerous work conditions throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. As a result, in 1908, the United States Congress passed the Federal Employers Liability Act, commonly referred to as FELA, allowing Railroad workers to directly sue their Railroad employer for any injury suffered on the job. They are at a substantially higher risk for occupational diseases, such as mesothelioma, lung cancer and laryngeal cancer. These diseases show up years after the worker’s initial exposure.

The railroad injury attorneys at Lipsitz and Ponterio, LLC have represented Brakemen, Conductors, Engineers, Firemen, Switchmen, and railroad maintenance workers who developed cancer as a result of their exposure to dangerous levels of both asbestos and diesel exhaust.

FELA requires a railroad to use reasonable care to provide its employees with a safe place to work. This duty includes the obligations to maintain the workplace in a reasonably safe condition and to provide employees with reasonably safe and sufficient equipment.

There is an absolute duty upon the railroad to provide a locomotive free of all safety hazards for the workers.

Prior to the late 1970s, railroad workers were exposed to asbestos-containing insulation materials used on cab heater lines, steam generators, steam boilers, the Y pipe that leads to the cab heater, governor lines, radiator supply and return lines, air compressor discharge lines, oil preheat lines, and expansion tank lines. Due to wear and tear, asbestos insulation materials required frequent removal and replacement. Both processes emitted large amounts of asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing brakes were another source of asbestos exposure for Railroad workers. When the brakes were engaged, asbestos dust was emitted and exposed railroad workers to dangerous levels of asbestos dust.

By the mid-1950s, diesel locomotives began replacing steam-driven locomotives. Idling diesel locomotives emitted large quantities of diesel exhaust. Open locomotive windows, cracks in the body of the cabs, and leaks in the diesel exhaust system caused workers to inhale diesel exhaust. Railroad workers commonly refer to the blue haze they could see when the locomotives were left running.

Some of the Railroads owned and operated throughout the State of New York in the 20th Century include:

» Arcade and Attica Railroad

»   Bath & Hammondsport Railroad (B&H Rail Corporation)

»   Buffalo Creek Railroad

» Conrail

» Consolidated Rail Corporation

» Delaware and Hudson Railway Company

»   Erie Lackawanna Railroad

» Erie Railroad

» Livonia, Avon and Lakeville Railroad

» Lowville and Beaver River Railroad

»   Massena Terminal Railroad

»   New York & Lake Erie

» New York Central Railroad

» Norfolk Southern Railway

» Ontario Central Railroad

» Ontario Midland Railroad

» Penn Central

»   Pennsylvania Railroad

» South Buffalo Railway

» Vermont Railway

About the Federal Employer’s Liability Act

The Federal Employer’s Liability Act makes it much easier for railroad injury attorneys to submit a successful railroad injury claim. In fact, this act gives each victim the choice between submitting a claim on the federal or state level.

The FELA also helps injured individuals by greatly reducing the burden of proof to bring a claim. The only requirement is that you provide proof that the injury was sustained as a result of railroad negligence.

Keep in mind that the FELA only covers railroad employees. Other drivers or pedestrians do not fall under the umbrella of this act.

To exercise your FELA rights, you must follow its guidelines. Start by notifying your immediate superior of the injury. Then, ask your union representative for assistance and consult with one of our attorneys, as well.

We will advise you to take the following steps:

  1. Make a prompt visit with a doctor
  2. File an application to the Railroad Retirement Board for disability benefits
  3. Gather up the information (names and contact info) of any witnesses to the injury
  4. If possible, take photos of the area where the accident occurred, including any equipment that was involved
  5. If possible, take photos of your injuries while they are still fresh

The damages you may recover will depend on several factors. But by following these steps, you’ll be more likely to receive fair compensation.

Our railroad injury attorneys will help you pursue these kinds of damages:

» Medical expenses

» Pain and suffering

» Lost employment

» Shame and emotional trauma as a result of disfigurement or disability

A railroad injury can leave you with these damages and more. Get in touch with our experienced railroad injury attorneys right away to start pursuing compensation.

What Factors Go into a Settlement for a Railroad Injury?

No two railroad injury cases are the same. But the factors that affect a settlement remain constant.

To help you better understand the kind of payout you can expect, our attorneys will discuss these factors with you:

» Whether you bear any responsibility for the accident

» The nature and degree of your injury

» Future pain and suffering

» Your ability to return to work

» Whether the injury requires further treatment

These factors and others will determine how much compensation you deserve. Keep in mind that while you do have the right to see a doctor of your choosing, the railroad is also entitled to an opinion from a doctor of its choice.

Trust Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford with Your Case

Our expertise is what you need in a time like this. The aftermath of an injury can be costly, painful, and overwhelming. Let our skilled railroad injury attorneys support you through every step of the claims process.

We can help you answer questions like, “Should I pursue a lawsuit in federal or local courts?” or even “Should I settle with the railroad directly?”

At Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, we have over 25 years of experience with railroad injury cases in Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester, NY. You can trust our team to guide you through the process step by step. If you or a loved one worked for a Railroad and have suffered an injury or illness, including mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us. Get started today. Contact us to schedule a free and confidential consultation.

Asbestos exposure can cause more than mesothelioma and lung cancer. For many, there are diagnosis that are not cancerous but still wreak havoc on their lives. In addition to mesothelioma and lung cancer, exposure to asbestos can cause other cancers and non-cancerous conditions.

Other Asbestos Injuries

Non-Cancerous Conditions Caused by Exposure to Asbestos

Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a scarring of the tiny air sacs on the inside of your lungs called alveoli. Asbestosis, this scarring of the inside of your lung tissue can affect your ability to breathe and in some advanced cases can impair the flow of oxygen from your lungs to other vital organs in your body.

While asbestosis is not a cancer, it is a progressive disease, meaning asbestosis can get worse over time.

Like other asbestos diseases, asbestosis is a latent disease which can first appear many years after your exposure to asbestos stopped.

Unlike mesothelioma, asbestosis is a dose-related disease. This means that the longer you were exposed to asbestos or the more intense your exposure to asbestos was in the past, the greater the likelihood of getting asbestosis.

It is not unusual for a person to be exposed to asbestos during the 1960s and 1970s, be healthy for twenty years and develop asbestosis twenty years after you were last exposed to asbestos.

People have contracted asbestosis in the following ways:

  1. Working directly with asbestos-containing products.
  1. Working in confined areas alongside other co-workers or outside contractors, who were applying or removing asbestos in your

If you or a family member has been diagnosed with asbestosis, please give the experienced attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford a call and we can help explain your legal rights and potential sources of recovery due to asbestosis.

Pleural Plaques

Pleural plaques are deposits of collagen fibers on the pleura, the outside lining of your lung. While pleural plaques are a marker or indicator that you had past asbestos exposure, they usually do not produce any respiratory symptoms.

It is not unusual for a person to be in good health, go for a routine chest x-ray and find out you have pleural plaques.

If you have pleural plaques, it is an objective sign that you had asbestos exposure in the past.

If you wish to discuss the legal implications of having pleural plaques, please feel free to call one of our experienced attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford and we would be happy to speak with you.

Other Asbestos Cancers

While mesothelioma and lung cancer are the two-primary asbestos-related cancers, exposure to asbestos in the past has also been implicated in causing other cancers such as esophageal cancer, laryngeal cancer and in some cases, gastrointestinal cancer.

It is more difficult in some instances to prove that these other cancers were caused by asbestos exposure.

If you have been diagnosed with one of these “other cancers” and want to know what your legal rights are, please call Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford and we will be happy to speak with you and your family.

Retain Our Mesothelioma Lawyers After a Diagnosis

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or asbestos-related injury, please give our office a call. We have experience representing all types of asbestos cases throughout Western New York. We have invaluable knowledge of almost every worksite that exposed their employees to asbestos. Take advantage of our huge database of information. Set up a free consultation with us today. We would be honored to represent you in your fight for justice.

WNY Jobsites

The following is a comprehensive list of job sites in and around Western New York that exposed their workers and bystanders to asbestos over the years. If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, you likely worked at or near one of the following job sites. Keep reading to find your job site, and then give us a call to set up a free consultation to get justice.

ABB Lummus Global, Inc.

Like many companies today, ABB Lummus Global, Inc. is the product of mergers. In 1988, Almänna Svenska Elektriska Aktiebolaget (General Swedish Electrical Limited Company, ASEA – est. 1883) and Brown, Boveri & Cie (BBC – est. 1891) merged into what would become ABB Asea Brown Boveri. With additional purchases by ABB in 1989, they announced their agreement to purchase Combustion Engineering, a major manufacturer of boilers in the United States, and the formation of their U.S. based ABB Lummus Global, Inc. The catalog of products manufactured by ABB as a whole include, but are not limited to, electrical lights, generators, electrical motors, controls, transformers, steam turbines, and boilers.

Many of the products mentioned above utilized asbestos-containing components and/or required the use of asbestos-containing insulation due to its ability to withstand high levels of heat. Tradesmen such as boilermakers and engineers were often tasked with removing asbestos-containing insulation around the boilers and steam turbines, as well as asbestos-containing gaskets around the doors in order to access what needed to be worked on or repaired. In turn they were often present amongst other tradesmen such as insulators. These insulators would cut asbestos-containing insulation products to size and mix asbestos-containing refractory cement to be used with reinsulating these boilers and steam turbines. Many of the electrical products such as transformers and controls utilized asbestos as well. Components such as asbestos-containing electrical panels and wire insulation were often manipulated, cut, broken, and disturbed by tradesmen such as electricians during installation and repair. Each one of the aforementioned processes produced asbestos-laden dust that was unavoidably breathed by any worker in the area. No matter the course or duration, any exposure to asbestos for any amount of time puts an individual at an increased risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Throughout the years ABB Lummus Global, Inc. and its subsidiaries sold many asbestos-containing products and equipment. These products and equipment were utilized anywhere from power plants, factories, hospitals, etc. The tradesmen who worked with these asbestos-containing products and equipment did so with little-to-no warning indicating the dangers they faced through their everyday work; needlessly increasing the customer’s risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked with any products or equipment produced by ABB Lummus Global, Inc. or any of its subsidiaries such as Combustion Engineering, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

ACandS (Armstrong Contracting and Supply Corporation)

Armstrong Contracting and Supply Corporation (ACandS) was established in 1958 as the insulation contracting division of Armstrong Cork. In New York State, ACandS established offices in Buffalo, Syracuse, Albany and New York City. In 1969, Irex Corporation acquired ACandS from Armstrong Cork. In 2002, ACandS filed a petition for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in order to establish a trust to resolve all current and future asbestos claims against the company.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the 1970’s, ACandS utilized asbestos-containing materials at commercial and industrial sites throughout the United States. Workers who handled or worked in the vicinity of asbestos-containing materials, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Employees who worked for ACandS, many of which were Asbestos Workers Local #4 members, applied asbestos-containing products manufactured by Turner & Newall, Owens Corning, Pittsburgh Corning, Ruberoid, Armstrong and Eagle-Picher. Asbestos-containing fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were applied at numerous locations throughout Upstate New York, such as DuPont, Bethlehem Steel, Xerox Tower, IBM Endicott and Carrier Corporation.

ACandS utilized fireproof insulation for fireproofing, soundproofing and insulation purposes. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mix of asbestos and Portland cement. Fireproofing was mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel with a hose. Large clouds of asbestos dust and fibers were emitted when fireproofing materials were applied. It was typical for tradesmen, such as electricians or pipefitters, to scrape fireproofing from structural steel in order to install pipes and conduits. Disturbing fireproofing material also caused asbestos fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled. Workers who handled or worked in the vicinity of asbestos-containing materials, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were applied and removed by individuals who worked for ACandS. Asbestos was incorporated into insulation because of its fire resistant properties. Asbestos-containing insulation was typically used in heating and cooling systems, factories, manufacturing facilities and boiler rooms. Steam boilers were covered with block insulation and insulating cement. Workers also applied insulating cement to pumps, valves and pipe elbows. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation emitted asbestos dust and fibers.

Some of the many locations throughout Upstate New York where ACandS worked are:

» Albany Medical Center;

» SUNY Albany;

» Alfred University;

»   Allied Chemical Corporation;

» Amherst Central High School;

» Armstrong Cork Co.;

» Attica State Prison;

» Batavia Downs Raceway;

» Bell AeroSystems;

»   Bethlehem Steel Corporation;

» Binghamton State Hospital;

»   Bison Products;

» SUNY Brockport;

» Buffalo Country Club;

» Buffalo Savings Bank;

» SUNY Buffalo;

» Carborundum Company;

»   Carlyle Compressor Plant;

» Carrier Corporation;

» Chevrolet Division of GMC;

» Clarence Senior High School;

» Columbus Hospital;

»   Cornell University;

» Corning Hospital;

» SUNY Cortland;

» DeGraff Hospital;

» Dresser Industries;

» I. DuPont deNemours Co., Inc.;

» SUNY Fredonia;

» General Aniline, later G.A.F.;

» General Electric;

» SUNY Geneseo;

» SUNY Geneva;

»   Harrison Radiator;

» B.M.;

» Ithaca College;

» Kenmore East High School;

» Memorial Auditorium;

» O.N.Y. Plaza;

» Niagara University;

» SUNY Oneonta;

» SUNY Oswego;

»   Rich Products;

»   Roswell Park Cancer Institute;

» Spaulding Fiber;

» Sweet Home School;

»   Syracuse Plastics Co.;

» Syracuse University;

» Upstate Medical Center;

» Utica College;

» Westinghouse Co.;

» Xerox Square.

ACandS utilized and distributed Limpet brand asbestos-containing fireproofing, and used it for fireproofing, soundproofing and insulation purposes. The asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mix of asbestos and portland cement. The asbestos containing fireproofing was mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel with a hose; a process that resulted in large clouds of asbestos-laden dust overwhelming the entire breathing zone in the area. Other tradesmen, such as electricians or pipefitters, would often scrape fireproofing from structural steel in order to install pipes and conduits. This process of disturbing fireproofing material also caused asbestos fibers to become airborne, which workers breathed in unavoidably.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked for ACandS and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Agway-Felmont

Beginning in 1966, Agway Inc. and Felmont Oil Corporation jointly operated a fertilizer manufacturing facility known as Agway-Felmont. The fertilizer plant was located on Buffalo Street in Olean, New York. Felmont manufactured anhydrous ammonia, and Agway utilized the ammonia in order to make ammonium nitrate, urea and other nitrogen-based fertilizers. The Agway-Felmont plant in Olean closed in 1983, because of high natural gas prices. In 2007, ExxonMobil purchased the property in order to remediate the soil and groundwater contamination caused by the Socony-Mobil oil refinery that was previously located on the site prior to Agway-Felmont. In 2010, Agway-Felmont’s remaining buildings were demolished, and the site is still considered to be part of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Brownfield Cleanup Program.

In recent years, former employees of Agway-Felmont have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Dozens of asbestos-containing materials, including transite, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation, were utilized at Agway-Felmont. Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The Agway-Felmont plant consisted of ten buildings on sixty-two acres of land. From the ammonium nitrate plant, to the urea plant and the mixing building, asbestos-containing materials could be found in materials, such as pipe covering, transite and gaskets. Roofs and siding on the buildings at Agway-Felmont were constructed from corrugated asbestos board, also known as transite. Corrugated asbestos board was composed of cement and raw asbestos fibers, and it was typically manufactured in four-foot by eight-foot sheets. When repairs were performed on a building, workers cut the transite, which emitted asbestos dust and fibers. Handling transite also caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering was utilized as an insulation material on steam and chemical lines throughout the Agway-Felmont plant. Boilers and chemical tanks were covered with insulating cement and asbestos block insulation. Asbestos was also incorporated into gaskets and packing material used inside pumps and valves. Due to wear and tear, it was common for asbestos-containing materials to be removed and reapplied. When worn asbestos insulation, gaskets or packing were removed, new asbestos-containing materials were applied so that pipes, boilers and other equipment could properly contain steam and other corrosive materials. Removing and reapplying asbestos-containing insulation emitted asbestos dust into the air, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Agway-Felmont in Olean, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Albany Felt Company

Founded in 1895, Albany Felt Company opened its doors along Broadway in Menands, NY. The Albany Felt Company prospered in the decades that followed, ultimately expanding its facilities over 14.45 acres employing hundreds of Albany area residents at its peak. In 1969, through the acquisition of Appleton Wire out of Wisconsin and Sweden’s Nordiska Maskinfilt, Albany Felt Company became Albany International, and would expand their product-line beyond industrial felt production and continue operations in Menands, NY until it closed its doors in 2011.

Albany Felt Company produced industrial felt for the regions paper industry. Since these felts were used in the oven and dryer sections of paper process machines, they often contained asbestos due to its ability to withstand high-heat applications. The production of this felt involved weaving large spools of asbestos yarn and other fibers together using industrialsized looms, along with cutting the felts to size. As a result of this production process, most notably on the second floor where the looms were located, weavers/loom operators and anyone else in the general area were exposed to high concentrations of asbestos-laden atmospheric dust. It is also important to note that any paper company that purchased and used asbestos-containing industrial felt produced by Albany Felt Company also exposed their own employees to the very same asbestos through the degradation of the felt over time.

The steam lines and much of the machinery such as pumps, valves, boilers and furnaces were covered in asbestos-containing insulating cement, pipe covering and block. In addition, much of the machinery also utilized asbestos-containing components such as gaskets and packing. Through the natural course of operations, repairs to the steam lines and machinery became necessary, requiring the manipulation, abrading, removal and installation of the asbestos-containing insulation and components; processes that further increased employee exposure to elevated and concentrated levels of asbestos in the air.

Throughout the years Albany Felt Company incorporated asbestos into its products and utilized asbestos-containing insulation and components, employees of Albany Felt Company and those of the paper companies who purchased their felt products inhaled and ingested dangerous levels of asbestos resulting in an increased risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

It is important to securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked at Albany Felt Company/Albany International in Menands, NY, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Albany Steam Station

The Albany Steam Station, once owned and operated by Niagara Mohawk Corporation, was established in 1952 in Glenmont, New York, as a coal-fired station. The four 376 megawatt units were converted to burn oil in 1970. In 1981, the units were once again converted to burn natural gas as well, which ultimately raised the plant’s output capacity to 400 megawatts. The four units were housed in one building served by two control rooms. PSEG acquired the station from Niagara Mohawk in 2000, and it is presently known as the Bethlehem Energy Center. The Albany Steam Station consisted of equipment that generated heat in order to produce electricity. Up until the mid-1970’s, asbestos was used extensively in the utility industry as insulation for high-heat temperature equipment, such as turbines, large boilers, pumps, steam lines and valves. Inhaling dust and particles from the application, maintenance and removal of asbestos insulation and other asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The Albany Steam station was insulated with asbestos-containing materials in order to contain heat and provide a stable internal temperature within the steam system. Asbestos block insulation was applied to a variety of equipment, and on occasion, the block insulation was cut prior to its application, which emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the air. Asbestos containing insulating cement and pipe covering were applied to pipes and steam lines. Asbestos gaskets and packing material could be found in valves and pumps throughout the steam system. Equipment at the steam station was often disrupted by power station laborers because of the constant need to maintain and update dated equipment, which required the removal and application of asbestos materials. This process exposed workers to asbestos dust, which filled the air. Even laborers who did not handle asbestos-containing materials, may have been exposed to dust and fibers emitted from maintenance procedures.

Most workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one worked at the Albany Steam Station and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Albright-Knox Art Gallery

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery first opened in 1905, through funds donated to the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy by John J. Albright. The Albright-Knox Art Gallery is the fourth-oldest art museum in the United States. Located on Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo, New York, the AlbrightKnox was known as the Albright Art Gallery until 1962, when Seymour Knox, Jr. donated a new addition to the building. In 1971, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery was added to the National Register of Historical Places. The Albright-Knox maintains collections of art in numerous styles, dating from the late Nineteenth Century up to the present day.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into materials used during the construction of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Workers installed asbestos-containing fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer, years after an initial exposure to airborne asbestos fibers.

Many trades, such as plasterers, insulators, carpenters, electricians and pipefitters assisted in the construction and renovation projects at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Structural steel was covered in asbestos-containing fireproof insulation. Asbestos pipe covering and insulating cement covered pipes throughout the Albright-Knox. Ducts and boilers were covered in asbestos-containing block insulation. Tradesmen who removed, applied or worked in the vicinity of these asbestos-containing materials may have been exposed to asbestos dust. Inhaling dust and fibers from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at the AlbrightKnox Art Gallery were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to con- tact us regarding your legal rights.

Alfred University

Alfred University was founded in 1836 as the Alfred Select School. Alfred has practiced a non-discriminatory admissions policy since it was established, and it is the second oldest co-educational institution in the country. With around 2000 students attending, Alfred is a small university. It offers bachelor’s and graduate degrees in a variety of subject areas. The Alfred University campus has undergone several expansions and renovations. Prior to the late 1970’s, asbestos was incorporated into materials utilized in the construction and maintenance of Alfred University buildings, including pipe covering, block insulation, insulating cement and fireproofing. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to water and steam pipes throughout the Alfred University campus, and asbestos block insulation covered the boilers. Handling, cutting or disturbing asbestos insulation emitted asbestos fibers into the air. Pipe elbows and valves were coated with asbestos insulating cement. Insulating cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the cement caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

The fireproof insulation applied at Alfred University was a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material was manufactured as a dry, fluffy substance, which was packaged in heavy paper bags. The dry fireproofing mix was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel surfaces with a hose. Mixing and applying fireproofing materials produced clouds of asbestos dust and fibers. In order to gain access to the structural steel for other structural applications, electricians, pipefitters, carpenters, sheet metal workers and other tradesmen routinely scraped away fireproof insulation after it was applied. When workers disturbed the insulation, asbestos fibers became airborne.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at Alfred University were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Alfred University and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Allegheny-Ludlum Steel – Watervliet

Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation was created in 1938 by the merger of the Allegheny Steel Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the Ludlum Steel Company of Watervliet, New York. In Watervliet, the Allegheny Ludlum steel plant was located on Lincoln Avenue, and it employed approximately 1,000 employees, many of whom were represented by labor unions, such as the United Steel Workers of America, Local 2478. The Watervliet plant manufactured specialty steel, which was incorporated into airplane motors for almost every aircraft used in the Army and Navy. In 1976, Allegheny Ludlum sold the plant to Al-Tech Specialty Steel. Al-Tech operated the plant until it went out of business in 1999.

Up until the late 1970’s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials, such as packing material, gaskets, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation, were installed and removed at the Allegheny-Ludlum plant. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material were utilized inside pumps, valves, and steam traps at Allegheny-Ludlum. Steam pipes were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos block insulation insulated steam boilers. Asbestos containing insulation was commonly removed and reapplied because of maintenance or repairs. When workers removed and reapplied asbestos insulation, asbestos-containing dust became airborne. Most workers were unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without protective masks.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Allegheny Ludlum in Watervliet, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

AlliedSignal, Inc.

AlliedSignal, Inc. was founded in 1985 when Allied Corp. and The Signal Companies Inc. merged. The origins of AlliedSignal date back to 1920, when Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation was formed. AlliedSignal began as a chemical company in Hopewell, Virginia and produced ammonia. In 1999 Allied Signal acquired Honeywell and it now goes by the Honeywell name.

AlliedSignal used asbestos until the 1980s. AlliedSignal mainly used asbestos in their refractory and friction products. In the automotive and aerospace industries, AlliedSignal used asbestos-containing refractory products, such as furnaces and kilns. Asbestos was often utilized in the production of aerospace products due to its heat resistant properties. Additionally, Allied Signal used asbestos in their brake pads and cement.

Allied Chemical, a predecessor to AlliedSignal, had three Western New York factories that used asbestos. These factories are Allied Chemical’s Buffalo Plant (sold in 1976 to Buffalo Color Corporation), Allied Chemical Solvay and Allied Chemical’s Tonawanda Plant (sold in 1978 and now known as Tonawanda Coke Corporation). These three plants had asbestos throughout. Asbestos was in boiler rooms, piping systems, pumps, valves, cement, insulation and more refractory products.

Allied Signal put many workers at risk of asbestos exposure. Those at risk include, but are not limited to, the following:

»   Plant workers

» Construction workers

» Mechanics

» Navy Veterans

» Oil refinery workers

» Shipyard Workers

» Second hand exposure from laundering clothes

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at and produced by Allied Signal. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at an Allied Signal facility or used products manufactured by Allied Signal and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Amatex Corporation

Amatex Corporation was founded in 1950 in Norristown, Pennsylvania as the American Asbestos Textile Corporation. Amatex manufactured textiles, including asbestos cloth, yarn, lap, thread and cord. Amatex focused its production on fiberglass textiles suited for high temperatures. In 1962, Amatex acquired an additional plant in Meredith, New Hampshire. Amatex Corporation still exists today and continues to produce textiles, but no longer uses asbestos.

Amatex used asbestos in its textiles due to asbestos’ heat resistant properties. Asbestos was also affordable and strengthened the textiles. Amatex produced textiles such as broad-woven cloth and narrow textiles. Amatex products were used in automotive assembly, shipbuilding, chemical plants, gas utilities, electrical power production, industrial insulation, and welding. Amatex factory workers were at high risk of asbestos exposure. Other workers who used Amatex products were also at risk of asbestos exposure.

Amatex Textiles with Asbestos Fibers include:

» Amatex Asbestos Woven Tape

» Asbestos Cloth

» Asbestos Cord

» Asbestos Lap

» Asbestos Rope

» Asbestos Roving

» Asbestos Tape

» Asbestos Thread

» Asbestos Tubing

» Asbestos Wick

» Asbestos Yarn

» Braids

» Carded Asbestos Fiber (contained 100% chrysotile asbestos)

»   Insulation Pads

» Insulation Mats

» Gaskets

» Quietline

» Rope

» Safecote (contained 80% chrysotile asbestos)

» Tapes

» Thermolan 26

» Titegrip

WNY Jobsites/Amatex Purchasers:

» Carbon Graphite

» Gaskets Inc.

» Garlock

Due to the volume of claims from former Amatex employees and users of Amatex products, Amatex filed for bankruptcy in 1982. Amatex’s bankruptcy plan created a trust fund of $16 million for future asbestos claims. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured at Amatex. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at Amatex, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Brass

The Buffalo Copper & Brass Rolling Mills Company was established in 1906 at the corner of Sayre Street and Military Road in Buffalo, New York. At the time, the facility was the largest brass rolling mill in the United States. In 1917, it was purchased by the American Brass Company. The Anaconda Copper Mining Company acquired American Brass in 1922 in order to integrate its mining business into copper and brass manufacturing. For over forty years, American Brass was a subsidiary company of Anaconda. In 1977, both Anaconda and American Brass were acquired by the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO). After years of declining profits, ARCO sold American Brass to the Buffalo Brass Company. American Brass profits increased, and in 1990, it was acquired by Outokumpu Oyj, a Finnish mining company. In 2005, Outokumpu sold American Brass to the Swedish investment firm Nordic Capital, and it was renamed Luvata Buffalo. In 2011, the facility was acquired by Aurubis AG, a German copper company. Throughout its history, the American Brass Buffalo plant manufactured brass and copper products, including anodes, sheets, strips, tubes, wires, connectors and military ammunition casings. It currently employs around 600 people.

Asbestos was incorporated into numerous materials at American Brass, including refractory materials, asbestos rope, electrical wire insulation, gaskets, pipe covering, insulating cement, transite pipe and block insulation. Workers who handled asbestos materials or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

During manufacturing processes at American Brass, workers utilized dozens of electrical furnaces in order to melt, anneal and soften metals. The interiors of the electrical furnaces were lined with asbestos-containing refractory materials, which protected the furnace from degrading. Asbestos-containing refractory materials are capable of resisting high temperatures, but the refractory materials deteriorated after constant use and required replacement. During the removal and application of refractory materials, asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled.

Electrical wiring that supplied power to the furnaces was also insulated with an asbestoswoven jacket in order to protect the wire from high temperatures. In copper and brass molds, asbestos rope was used as a packing material in order to ensure that molten metal did not fall into the gaps between the molds.

Asbestos-containing materials were also utilized in maintenance and repair procedures at the American Brass facility in Buffalo. Steam boilers, pipes, valves and pumps were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. Asbestos gaskets were used to ensure a tight seal between flanges of valves, pumps and pipes. In high-temperature areas of the facility, transite pipe was utilized as an electrical conduit. Transite pipe was composed of cement and asbestos. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed worn pipe covering or block insulation; scraped gaskets from flanges; and replaced damaged transite pipes. These processes released asbestos-containing dust into the air, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at American Brass in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Laundry Machinery Company

Workers exposed to asbestos at The American Laundry Machinery Company are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In 1907 The American Laundry Machinery   Company was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio. Originally, The American Laundry Machinery Company was a laundry machine manufacturer. In 1930, The American Laundry Machinery Company opened a facility at 110 Buffalo Road in Rochester, New York. The American Laundry Machinery Company produced commercial laundry machines and other textile equipment.

Asbestos was used in clothes dryers through the 1980s. Clothes dryers often contained asbestos in the electrical components, drive belts, combustion chamber insulation and felts. Workers at The American Laundry Machinery Company, as well as those who worked on their products are at risk of exposure to asbestos.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-contain- ing products manufactured by and present at The American Laundry Machinery Company. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at The American Laundry

Machinery Company, or as a result of using or working on their products, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Olean Tile Company

The origins of the American Olean Tile Company date back to 1912 when it was founded by Charles Fuller and O.W. Pierce as the Olean Tile Company in Olean, New York. With the hire of an Alfred University ceramics student, Gordon D. Philips, the company’s tile business steadily grew in the decades that followed. In 1958 National Gypsum Company purchased the existing entities of Olean Tile Company, American Encaustic Tile Co. and American Olean and formed American Olean Tile Company, which became a wholly owned subsidiary of National Gypsum Company. In 1988 American Olean Tile Company was sold to Armstrong World Industries, Inc. On December 29, 1995, the former American Olean Tile Company was purchased by Dal-Tile and dissolved. Dal-Tile ultimately fell victim to Mohawk Industries through a merger in 2001.

With the formation of American Olean Tile Company in 1958 asbestos was added as a component in many of the company’s product formulations, especially floor tile. In addition to manufacturing asbestos-containing tiles, American Olean Tile Company also sold asbestos containing thinset mortars (flooring adhesive) that it purchased from L&M Products Inc. and resold. American Olean Tile Company continued to incorporate asbestos into these products until about 1978.

Those who worked at American Olean Tile Company, especially during the years 1958 – 1978, were undoubtedly exposed to asbestos. As workers would have mixed in raw asbestos fiber into the ceramic tile formulations, asbestos-laden dust became airborne exposing anyone in the area. Those who installed asbestos-containing tiles manufactured by American Olean Tile Company, such as general customers and union tile-setters from Local 45, were also exposed. These asbestos-containing tiles were often cut to size, creating asbestos-contaminated dust in that persons breathing zone, and then affixed using asbestos-containing thinset mortar. No matter the course or duration, any exposure to asbestos for any amount of time puts an individual at an increased risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Throughout the years American Olean Tile Company manufactured and sold many asbestos- containing products. These products were utilized in residential and commercial settings alike for kitchens, bathrooms, pools, etc. The factory workers, tradesmen, and general customers who worked with these asbestos-containing products did so with little-to-no warning indicating the dangers they faced, needlessly increasing the individual’s risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked with any products sold and/or manufactured by American Olean Tile Company, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Amherst Central High School

In 1930, Amherst Central High School (ACHS) was established as a public school. Located in Snyder, New York, Amherst Central High School caters to grades 9-12. Serving Eggertsville, Snyder and a portion of the Village of Williamsville, ACHS is the only high school in the Amherst Central School district system. Today, it has a student population of roughly 1,000 students.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into a wide variety of building materials used during the construction of the high school. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. Since 1930, various renovations and additions have taken place at Amherst Central High School. During renovations, workers may have been exposed to asbestos materials, including fireproofing, electrical components, pipe covering, block insulation, floor and ceiling tiles, mastic and joint compound (mud).

Boilers and associated piping used to heat the high school were insulated with asbestos containing block and pipe insulation. Asbestos packing and gaskets were used to maintain pumps, valves and steam traps. Plaster walls were repaired and replaced, involving the use of asbestos-containing joint compound. Asbestos floor and ceiling tiles were used throughout the school and had the tendency to crack or break. Due to normal wear and tear, these materials were removed and reapplied and, in the process, emitted dangerous levels of asbestos dust and fibers that contractors and maintenance personnel inhaled.

On January 3, 1968, a boiler room fire struck Amherst Central High School. The fire was caused by oil that was spilled inside one of the boilers. The boiler room was substantially damaged, and the existing boilers were removed. Asbestos-containing pipe covering and block insulation were removed from the damaged boilers and pipes and reapplied to the new steam and water lines, as well as the boilers. Damaged asbestos-containing ceiling and floor tiles were removed and replaced. In all of these processes, asbestos fibers were released into the air. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have a combined total of nearly 100 years of experience representing representing victims of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one were once a laborer or maintenance worker who worked at Amherst Central High School in Amherst, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Ansco

Founded in Binghamton, New York, in 1901, Ansco was a manufacturer of photographic products and film. Ansco was originally founded through the merger of E. Anthony & Company and Scovill Manufacturing. In 1928, Ansco merged with Agfa to form Agfa-Ansco. The new corporation was a division of General Aniline and Film (GAF) Corporation, which was controlled by the German chemical cartel IG Farben. After Germany declared war on the United States in 1941, the United States Government seized the assets of GAF, including Agfa-Ansco. In 1943, the company removed “Agfa” from its name, once again becoming Ansco. The United States Justice Department oversaw Ansco’s operation until 1965, when government-held stock in GAF was sold to the public. In 1977, GAF eliminated its line of consumer photography products, including those manufactured by Ansco at the Binghamton facility. GAF also sold the Ansco trademark to Haking Enterprises. GAF continued to manufacture film at the Binghamton plant for industrial and medical use until 1981, when it sold the plant to Anitec Image Corporation. Over the next two decades, the former Ansco facility was sold several times, and in 2000, it was demolished.

Prior to the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance of buildings at Ansco’s Binghamton facility, including fireproof insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement. Inhaling dust from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to structural steel during the construction of buildings at Ansco. Fireproofing materials were manufactured as a dry mixture of asbestos, linen and cement, packaged in fifty-pound paper bags. The dry mixture was mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel using a hose. Pouring, mixing and spraying fireproof insulation created clouds of asbestos-containing dust. After the fireproofing material was applied, it was typical for tradesmen, such as electricians or pipefitters, to scrape the fireproofing material from structural steel in order to install pipes and conduits. When the fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos fibers and dust became airborne.

Workers applied asbestos-containing pipe covering to pipes at the Binghamton Ansco facility. Pipe covering was applied to numerous piping systems in order to maintain stable internal temperatures and to protect pipes from damage. When pipe covering was applied, asbestos fibers were emitted. Insulating cement was also applied to pumps, valves and other equipment. It was manufactured as a powder and mixed with water to prepare it for application. Mixing insulating cement caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at Ansco in Binghamton, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Ashland Oil

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents numerous former and retired workers who were once employed at the Ashland Oil, Tonawanda, NY refinery. In recent years, former employees at Ashland Oil have developed and died of mesothelioma and other asbestos- related diseases. Our Firm has represented Ashland Oil workers with mesothelioma who worked in a wide variety of jobs at the plant. Some of these jobs have included yardmen, maintenance men, cat cracker operators and those who were involved in turnarounds where the entire refinery would shut down its operations so that pipes, valves and pumps could be refurbished and replaced.

In the process of representing these workers and their families, our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. Ashland Oil workers were exposed to asbestos dust from working with and in the vicinity of a wide variety of asbestos containing products including, thermal insulation in the form of pipe covering block and cement; gaskets containing blue asbestos; and asbestos packing used in pumps and valves.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Ashland Oil and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Auburn Steel

Auburn Steel Company (Austeel) was located in Auburn, New York, and it began operations in 1974. The steel mill was considered a “mini mill” and occupied an 812,000-square foot building. Auburn Steel was in the business of reclaiming old steel in order to melt it into billets and finished products. In February 1983, Auburn Steel found that its steel was accidently contaminated with Cobalt 60, a radioactive material. The source of radiation was traced to scrap metal, but the origin was never determined. This accident led to numerous law suits, an envi- ronmental investigation and a $2 million-dollar clean-up of the facility. In 2002, Auburn Steel was acquired by Nucor Steel, which continues to operate the Auburn plant.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos could be found as a component of materials that were exposed to high heat temperatures, including pipe covering and insulation. Dozens of asbes- tos-containing materials were installed and removed at steel plants throughout the United States. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Laborers at Auburn Steel utilized hot tops during the steel reclamation process. A hot top is a cast iron device located on the top of a steel mold, which traps impurities that rise out of the steel as the ingot cools and solidifies. In order to protect the hot top from damage, the interior of the hot top is lined with refractory materials. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was used as a refractory material because of its ability to withstand high temperatures. Hot tops used at Auburn Steel were lined with either brick and asbestos-containing mortar or asbestos insulating boards.

Asbestos insulating boards were primarily manufactured by Ferro Engineering and Foseco Inc. The number of boards placed inside a hot top depended on the size of the mold, which ranged in size from one foot to ten feet wide. Even the act of handling an asbestos insulating board emitted asbestos fibers into the air. After each ingot or steel mold was cast, the asbestos insulating boards inside the hot top turned to ash and required replacement. Laborers used an air hose to remove the asbestos-containing ash from the hot top. This action created a cloud of asbestos-containing dust, which was inhaled by laborers working on the hot top and anyone else in the surrounding vicinity.

If you or your loved one worked at Auburn Steel (Austeel) in Auburn, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

ABEX-Corporation (Medina, NY)

ABEX Foundry in Medina, NY

The Abex Corporation first appeared in 1928 serving primarily as a metals foundry. Over the course of the Corporation’s life, it opened a manufacturing facility located at 3928 Bates Road, Medina, New York, as a manufacturer of brakes and wheels. As time passed, the Abex Corporation continued to manufacture brakes until it was purchased by the Illinois Central Industries, and later became the Pneumo-Abex Corporation. The corporation closed the Medina Facility in February, 1985. During their operation, the Abex Corporation manufactured brakes and brake liners with asbestos.

The Abex Manufacturing plant in Medina has manufactured brake materials and other friction products for a wide variety of automobiles and trains. A majority of Abex Corporation employees were metalworkers who frequently came in contact with asbestos. Many of the Abex Corporation’s products contained asbestos as the material worked as an insulating agent to help prevent its products from sparking and catching fire.

Anyone who has used or worked around Abex Corp’s products in other industries have been put at risk of asbestos exposure and mesothelioma. This includes railroad workers who made, maintained, repaired, and operated railroad cars and trains. This also includes automobile and aerospace employees who used the hydraulic and power fluid systems, as well as brake components the Abex Corporation made with asbestos.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Abex Corporation in Medina, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

FACTS

» The ABEX Corporation was established in 1928 as American Brake and Shoe Foundry, a Virginia-based company that produced brakes and wheels for railroad cars.

» In 1968, Illinois Central Industries Inc. purchased ABEX, and 10 years later, merged it with the Pneumo Corporation, creating the Pneumo ABEX Corporation. After the merger, the company added more products to its manufacturing line, including industrial and aerospace fluid products.

» The Abex Medina site was located at 3959 Bates Road, Medina, New York.

» In addition to manufacturing asbestos brakes, the company produced wheels for railroad cars and hydraulic systems for vessels and planes

» According to the Fulton article: The Medina plant produced iron tire molds, pump castings, gas turbine housings and a variety of other specialized parts requiring close dimensional controls and high integrity casting.

» According to the Fulton article: “This ABEX plant is one of 56 plants in the corporation, which in turn is a subsidiary of I.C. Industries, a highly diversified international company marketing a broad range of products and services.“

» ABEX customers included: U.S. Steel, B.F. Goodrich, Carrier Corporation, Ingersoll-Rand, General Electric, Republic Steel, Firestone, Foster-Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bethlehem Steel, Armstrong Rubber Company, Curtiss Wright, Corning Glass, Ford, and General Motors.

Advance Auto Parts

Advance Auto Parts was founded by Arthur Taubman in 1932 when he purchased a local chain of home & auto supply stores out of Roanoke, Virginia. The chain was known at the time as Advance Stores, and they sold products such as toys, electronics, household appliances, as well as automotive parts. When the retail landscape began to change in the 1970s the concept of shopping malls and big box stores gained popularity. In response, Advance Stores narrowed its focus to the sales of automotive parts and accessories in order to position themselves to stand out as a specialty store. Advance Stores Company changed their

name to Advance Auto in 1974 and again in 1985 to Advance Auto Parts, as it is known today. In 1998, Advance Auto Parts purchased Western Auto Supply Company/Parts America, doubling the company’s size. Advance Auto Parts is the second largest publicly traded automotive parts chain in the United States with locations in Canada, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Advance Auto Parts umbrella includes well-known brands such as CARQUEST, Auto Parts, WorldPac, Autopart International and DieHard.

Professional installers and do it yourself customers patronized Advance Auto Parts, as well as predecessor Advance Stores. Many of the parts purchased, notably friction products such as brake shoe linings, brake pads and clutch faces, were produced/manufactured with asbestos fibers as part of the composition. The addition of asbestos with its ability to withstand high heat, added durability to these friction products and in some cases was incorporated through a portion of the 1990s.

Auto mechanics were exposed to asbestos through friction products in several different ways. When brake drums were removed during repair, it was common practice to use an air hose in order to remove the asbestos-containing brake dust. When new brakes were installed, they were often sanded or ground down to better fit the contour of the drum, releasing asbestos dust into the air. Even basic cleaning processes such as sweeping caused respirable asbestos fibers to become airborne.

Auto parts retailers and distributors were exposed to asbestos through handling and demonstrating a brake or clutch assembly to customers. Do it yourself mechanics who purchased and installed Advanced Auto Parts such as a brake or clutch pad also risked exposure to asbestos.

No matter the course or duration, any exposure to asbestos for any amount of time puts an individual at an increased risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Throughout the years, Advance Auto Parts sold many asbestos-containing automotive friction products that were manufactured and distributed by various companies such as Ford. The customers who purchased these asbestos-containing friction products did so with littleto-no warning labels indicating the dangers they faced through the use and manipulation of these products; needlessly increasing the customer’s risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one purchased and/or used asbestos-containing friction products from Advance Auto Parts, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Akron Porcelain and Plastics Company

Akron Porcelain and Plastics Company was originally established as Akron Pottery by Edwin

  1. Merrill and Henry E. Merrill in 1861 at South Main and State Streets in Akron, Ohio. The company was incorporated in 1887, and it manufactured stoneware products. By 1880, Akron pottery began to diversify because traditional pottery and stoneware experienced a rapid decline in sales. The Merrill brothers expanded their molding capabilities and began to manufacture clay pipes, which brought about a series of name changes for the company. Akron Pottery became The Akron Smoking Pipe Company in 1890. After consolidating and buying out five other companies, Akron Smoking Pipe Company became the Mogadore Insulator Company in 1920, and the Akron Porcelain Company in 1928. Throughout the series of name changes, the company’s product line grew to include innovative products, including electrical insulators and molded plastics.

Akron Porcelain Company intended to stay true to porcelain, however, it could not keep up with its competitors who were using plastics. By 1958, Akron Porcelain Company began to manufacture plastic parts for the electrical and automotive industries. The company legally became Akron

Porcelain and Plastics in 1984 and is still open today after 125 years of business.

Prior to the mid-1980s, many of Akron Porcelain Company’s plastic products utilized asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds. When manipulated, drilled or sanded, asbestos containing molded plastic products produce asbestos-laden dust that becomes airborne and unavoidably inhaled and/or ingested. Molders, finishers and other laborers were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process of asbestos-containing plastic parts. Workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing materials but were in the vicinity where it was manufactured or molded may also have been subjected to asbestos exposure. No matter the course or duration, any exposure to asbestos for any amount of time puts an individual at an increased risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked at Akron Porcelain and Plastics Company in Akron, Ohio, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Albany Medical Center

Albany Medical Center is a 734 bed hospital located on New Scotland Avenue in Albany, New York. It is the largest hospital in the Capital District, and it is also one of the largest employers in the region, with a staff of nearly 7,000 employees. The Albany Medical Center campus includes the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital. The Albany Medical College is affiliated with Union College in nearby Schenectady, New York. Albany Medical Center has been located at the New Scotland Avenue site since 1926, and it has undergone numerous expansions and renovations.

Up until the late 1970s, workers utilized dozens of asbestos-containing materials during construction and maintenance procedures at Albany Medical Center. Fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, boilers and associated equipment throughout the hospital. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel at Albany Medical Center in order to protect the steel from fire damage. Fireproofing was manufactured as a dry mix, which was typically packaged in one hundred pound bags. Raw fireproofing material was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto steel surfaces with a hose. During the mixing and application processes, an enormous amount of asbestos-containing dust and fibers were emitted into the work area. Additionally, tradesmen, such as pipefitters, electricians, ironworkers and carpenters routinely disturbed the fireproofing after it was installed in order to install pipes, conduits, ventilation ducts and other building materials.

Steam and water pipes at Albany Medical Center were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement in order to maintain a constant temperature within the plumbing systems. Block insulation was applied to steam boilers, which allowed the boilers to operate more efficiently. During maintenance procedures, asbestos-containing materials were removed in order to make repairs within the heating system. When maintenance procedures were complete, workers applied new asbestos insulation. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulating materials caused asbestos fibers and dust to become airborne.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Albany Medical Center were employed by various contractors throughout the Capital District. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Albany Medical Center and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Albany VA Medical Center

The Albany Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center was established in 1951, and it currently serves 32,000 veterans a year. This 16-story medical building is located on Holland Avenue in Albany, New York, and it contains 156 beds. The Albany VA provides inpatient and outpatient services to veterans. In 1990, the hospital was renamed Albany Stratton VA Medical Center in honor of Samuel S. Stratton, who served as a U.S. congressman for 30 years in the Albany area. The Albany VA Medical Center is recognized as a comprehensive cancer center by the American College of Surgeons.

Up until the late 1970’s dozens of asbestos-containing materials, such as fireproof insulation, pipe covering, floor tiles and insulating cement were used during construction and maintenance procedures at the Albany VA Medical Center. Workers, who applied, removed or maintained asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The Albany VA Medical Center was heated by steam produced in boilers. Asbestos-containing insulation was applied to boilers, pumps, valves and pipes within the steam system. Workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment during maintenance and repair procedures. When these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation released asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel at the Albany VA Medical Center in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Asbestos was commonly incorporated into fireproofing materials because of its resistance to fire. Fireproofing material was mixed with water and sprayed onto the steel. This process emitted dust clouds, which contained asbestos. Most workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for the Albany VA Medical Center were employed by various contractors throughout New York State. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction or maintenance of the Albany VA Medical Center and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

ALCOA Massena

ALCOA Massena Operations is the world’s oldest continuously operating aluminum production and fabrication facility. Alcoa, or the Aluminum Company of America, was founded in 1902 as the Pittsburgh Reduction Company. Alcoa’s smelting facility is located outside Massena, New York, in order to take advantage of the abundant hydroelectric power in the area. Alcoa smelts aluminum from aluminum oxide and casts it into basic shapes for use by industrial customers. When Alcoa merged with Reynolds Metals in 2000, the original Alcoa facility became known as the Massena West Plant, and the Reynolds facility became known as the Massena East Plant. In 2014, Alcoa ceased operations at its Massena East plant. As of 2016, Massena West is still operating at full capacity. Located on North Grasse River Road, the Massena West facility consists of 72 buildings on over 1,100 acres of land, and it currently employs over 700 people.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used at Alcoa in Massena. Workers who handled asbestos materials or were in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

During manufacturing processes at Alcoa, laborers operated dozens of electrical furnaces and electrolytic cells (also known as pots) in order to extract aluminum from aluminum oxide, which is also called alumina. The interiors of the electrical furnaces and pots were lined with asbestos-containing refractory materials, which were capable of resisting high temperatures. Due to constant wear and tear, the refractory materials deteriorated and required replacement. During the removal and application processes of refractory materials, asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing materials were also utilized in maintenance and repair procedures at the Alcoa facility in Massena. Steam boilers and pipes were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. Asbestos gaskets were used to ensure a tight seal between flanges of valves, pumps and pipes. Asbestos-containing packing material was used in order to prevent leaks in valve stems and pump shafts. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed worn asbestos insulation; scraped gaskets from flanges; and replaced packing material. These processes released asbestos-containing dust into the air, which laborers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Alcoa in Massena, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Allegheny-Ludlum Steel – Dunkirk

Allegheny-Ludlum Steel was initially established as the Atlas Crucible Steel Company in 1907. Located on Brigham Road in Dunkirk, New York, the steel plant manufactured wires, rods and bars from billets of stainless steel and other steel alloys. Atlas was acquired in 1929, by the Ludlum Steel and Spring Company. Beginning in the 1930s, Allegheny-Ludlum Steel of Dunkirk, New York, went through a series of mergers and acquisitions, which ultimately led to the plant’s foreclosure by Empire State Development, a state agency that held its mortgage. In 2002, Universal Stainless and Alloy Products purchased the land and buildings, and operations resumed under the name Dunkirk Specialty Steel.

The Allegheny-Ludlum Steel plant covered nearly eighty acres. Up until the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials, such as packing material, gaskets, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were installed and removed at the Allegheny-Ludlum plant. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material were utilized inside pumps and valves at Allegheny-Ludlum. Steam pipes were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos block insulation insulated steam boilers. Asbestos-containing insulation was commonly removed and reapplied because of maintenance or repairs. When workers removed and reapplied asbestos insulation, asbestos-containing dust became airborne. Most workers were unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without protective masks.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Allegheny-Ludlum in Dunkirk, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Allied Chemical

In recent years, workers involved in the operation and maintenance of Allied Chemical facilities, a.k.a AlliedSignal, now Honeywell International Inc., have developed and died of meso- thelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Allied Chemical maintained three production facilities in Western New York: Semet-Solvay (Tonawanda Coke), Buffalo Color and Solvay Process Company. Asbestos insulation lined steam and chemical pipes, boilers, pumps, vessels and other equipment throughout these Western New York manufacturing facilities.

Until the mid-1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized as efficient insulation for intensely heated equipment, such as pipes and boilers. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos insulation and other materials placed employees at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at Semet-Solvay (Tonawanda Coke), Buffalo Color and Solvay Process Company. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at an Allied Chemical production facility and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Alpha Portland Cement

In 1917, the Alpha Portland Cement Company acquired the former Thomas Millen Company’s cement plant on Ogle Road in Jamesville, New York. In 1952, Alpha added a new concrete plant at the current site in order to increase production, and in 1959, new storage silos were constructed. The Alpha Portland Cement plant in Jamesville manufactured Portland cement, mortar and fast-setting cement. The plant consisted of fourteen buildings on 130 acres, and it was capable of producing 2,750 barrels of cement per day. In 1981, the Jamesville plant closed due to poor economic conditions in the construction industry.

In recent years, former employees of Alpha Portland Cement have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos was incorporated into packing material and gaskets utilized during maintenance procedures at Alpha. Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing packing material was used at Alpha Portland Cement in order to prevent leaks from pump shafts and valve stems. Workers at Alpha Portland Cement used pumps and valves in order to shift the flow of concrete from one tank to another. Packing material was manufactured as a woven material with squared edges, and it was often impregnated with chemicals and minerals, such as carbon and asbestos, in order to allow the shaft or stem to move freely. During maintenance, workers removed the worn packing material with a tool called a packing puller. New packing material was cut to fit the circumference of the shaft or stem and inserted. Removing and applying packing material emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the air, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized at Alpha Portland Cement in order to ensure a tight seal between pipe flanges, pumps, valves and other equipment within the cement pumping system. Due to frequent wear and tear, workers at Alpha Portland Cement replaced gaskets during maintenance procedures. When a gasket was replaced, workers scraped the old gasket off the flange, which caused asbestos dust to become airborne. A new gasket was fabricated from a sheet of asbestos-containing gasket material. Holes were punched into the gasket to match the bolt holes on the flange. Cutting and punching the gasket material emitted asbestos fibers.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at the Alpha Portland Cement Company in Jamesville, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Biltrite Inc.

American Biltrite Inc. was founded in 1908 in Trenton, New Jersey as Ewell Rubber and primarily produced rubber heels and soles for shoes. Two years later the company added a second manufacturing   facility, Panther Rubber Mfg. Co., in Stoughton, Massachusetts. Then, in 1913, the company expanded into Canada followed by the addition of another manufacturing facility in 1917 in Chelsea, Massachusetts. In 1932 the Chelsea and Stoughton divisions were renamed the Panther Panco Rubber Company and the company’s name remained until 1951, when the company became known as American Biltrite Rubber Company. The Chelsea plant began to produce Amtico Rubber Flooring in 1917

and became known as American Tile and Rubber Company. By the 1960s, American Biltrite had expanded into other industries and began to use asbestos. At that time, American Biltrite was producing vinyl asbestos tile and asbestos-containing asphalt tile. In 1954, American Biltrite Rubber Co. was incorporated, and in 1973 its name was changed to American Biltrite Inc.

In 1961, American Biltrite purchased Bonafide Mills, Inc. and began producing asbestos-containing products at its headquarters in Trenton, NJ. Bonafide Mills manufactured vinyl asbestos and asphalt covering, and American Biltrite used asbestos due to its heat resistant and durable properties.

Asbestos-Containing Products include:

» Vinyl asbestos floor tile

» Asphalt tile

» Sheet vinyl flooring with asbestos felt backing

American Biltrite workers were at high risk of asbestos exposure. This includes workers who installed and removed asbestos-containing products. Additionally, homeowners and those working in older buildings are at risk. When asbestos-tile is disturbed, the asbestos particles become airborne and put those working with the tiles in danger of asbestos exposure. Those who worked with these materials are at a greater risk of inhaling asbestos fibers which can become embedded in the lungs and cause mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis, and other diseases years later. Other occupations impacted by American Biltrite’s use of asbestos include carpenters, construction workers, demolition workers, factory workers, shipyard workers and tile workers.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by American Biltrite. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at American Biltrite, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Cyanamid Company

American Cyanamid Company was founded in 1907 in West Paterson, New Jersey and focused on fertilizer production. Cyanamid is a compound of lime, carbide, and nitrogen used in fertilizer. American Cyanamid soon expanded into the chemical industry, utilizing asbestos in its products and at its facilities. By the mid-1970s, American Cyanamid had almost 100,000 employees and over 200,000 shareholders. However, American Cyanamid faced major financial ups and downs throughout its history, which led it to use dangerous toxins in its products. Asbestos was one of these toxins.

Company History

In the early 1900s, American Cyanamid’s products were utilized by people in the agricultural industry. However, as a result of World War I, which disproportionately impacted farmers, American Cyanamid’s sales decreased. World War I decreased the demand for fertilizer, but it increased the need for Cyanamid, which was previously supplied by Germany. American Cyanamid started manufacturing Cyanide from Cyanamid, which broadened its market as a supplier to mining companies. American Cyanamid also began to produce hydrocyanic acid.

American Cyanamid entered a period of growth in the mid-1920s. The company began to diversify and exchanged common stock for holdings in other companies. This diversification continued and in the 1960s American Cyanamid moved its headquarters to Wayne, New Jersey. American Cyanamid’s biggest divisions were located in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, while its subsidiaries existed across the globe.

Throughout the 1970s, American Cyanamid was often in the spotlight due to accusations that employee’s health was at risk from harmful toxins, as well as for labor disputes and environmental concerns in the company. In 1978, 1,300 American Cyanamid workers at the New Jersey Plant went on strike to bring awareness to the dangerous work environment. American Cyanamid also contributed to major environmental pollution. The EPA considers American Cyanamid among the top chemical waste sites in the United States. In 1983, EPA added the 233-hectare facility to its Superfund list of sites harboring hard-to-remediate hazardous wastes.

In the 1990s, American Cyanamid branched off into separate businesses, including Cytec Industries which was acquired by Solvay in 2015. In 1994, American Cyanamid merged with American Home Products. This was the second-largest industrial acquisition in United States history at the time. Later, American Home Products changed its name to Wyeth Corporation, and in 2009 Wyeth Corporation merged with Pfizer.

American Cyanamid and Asbestos

American Cyanamid utilized asbestos in all of its facilities. Asbestos was used in boiler houses, as well as floor tiles and roof tiles. Further, American Cyanamid manufactured asbestos- containing products. Asbestos was a cheap and easy way to make products durable and heat-resistant.

American Cyanamid Asbestos Products:

» Cymel 592 – This product was a melamine-formaldehyde asbestos molding compound. It was used in car and aircraft ignition parts, circuit breakers and other industrial applications that utilized high temperatures.

» Melmac 405 Laminating Resin – This product was a melamine-formaldehyde resin made with layers of asbestos.

» Fiberite – This product was a form of asbestos molding compound.

American Cyanamid also worked with other prominent asbestos manufacturers, such as GAF, Armstrong, Johns Manville, Raybestos and Owens Corning Fiberglass.

American Cyanamid workers are at high risk of asbestos exposure. Additionally, occupations such as electricians, engineers, farmers, mechanics and insulators are at risk of asbestos exposure from American Cyanamid products. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by American Cyanamid. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at American Cyanamid, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Locomotive Company (ALCO)

The American Locomotive Company, also known as ALCO, was formed in 1901 from the merger of eight smaller locomotive manufacturers, including Schenectady Locomotive Works. After the 1901 merger, ALCO chose Schenectady, New York, as its headquarters, and the former Schenectady Locomotive Works became one of ALCO’s main manufacturing facilities. The Schenectady plant was originally built on a 112 acre plot on Erie Boulevard between Nott Street and Freeman’s Bridge, but the plant was reduced to roughly 60 acres after the facility was modernized in the 1950s. With over 75,000 individual locomotives to its credit, ALCO was one of the largest manufacturers of steam engines in the United States. During its most active years, the plant had the capacity to produce over 1,000 locomotives per year, and it employed over 5,000 workers.

During the 1900s, ALCO began to diversify its business model in order to focus on non-rail products, such as oil production, nuclear production equipment, heat exchangers and munitions. In 1955, ALCO was renamed Alco Products, Inc., because locomotives were no longer its predominant product. In 1964, Alco Products was purchased by Worthington Company, and the plant remained in operation until it was sold to General Electric in 1969.

Prior to the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance of the ALCO facility. Asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering, packing materials, gaskets and insulating cement were used extensively throughout ALCO’s manufacturing facility. Laborers who applied and removed asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

ALCO’s Schenectady plant utilized steam heat in order to heat the buildings throughout its manufacturing facility. Asbestos insulation lined steam pipes, boilers, pumps, gaskets, turbine generators, and other equipment throughout ALCO’s Schenectady plant. Due to wear and tear, contractors and maintenance personnel removed and applied asbestos-containing materials. When workers handled asbestos-containing insulation, asbestos dust and fibers were released into the air and into the breathing zone of anyone in the vicinity.

Tradesmen, such as pipefitters, steam fitters, and electricians, were exposed to asbestos during installation and maintenance of the heat system and steam stations. The steam stations transferred heat to different buidlings throughtout ALCO’s manufacturing facility. Pipes, valves, condensers and strainers within the steam stations and steam system were covered with asbestos-containing materials. Insulating cement, such as 7M cement, was applied to pumps, valves and other equipment throughout the facility. During maintenance and repair procedures on the steam system workers removed worn pipe covering and/or block insulation; scraped insulating cement and gaskets; and pulled packing material from pumps and valves. In order to assemble a new valve, pipe fitters welded new valves to the existing valves and repacked the asbestos packing material within the valves. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, such as Johns Manville, was reapplied to the pipes and tie-ins. Removing, cutting, manipulating and applying asbestos-containing materials emitted clouds of asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application, removal and maintenance of asbestos materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems, including mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at American Locomotive Company and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

American Radiator/American Standard

American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corporation’s beginnings date back to 1886 when Clarence Mott Woolley formed the Michigan Radiator & Iron Company of Detroit. Woolley’s company manufactured cast iron (rather than the more expensive steel) radiators. The business was a success, and by 1891 the company merged with the Detroit Radiator Company and the Pierce Steam Heating Company, which eventually brought six American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corporation plants to Buffalo, New York.

In 1899, the Ahrens and Ott Manufacturing Company, the Standard Manufacturing Company, the Dawes and Myler Manufacturing Company and six smaller corporations consolidated to form the Standard Manufacturing Company, which manufactured a variety of sanitary and plumbing supplies. During the early 1900s, American Radiator became very profitable, and by 1929, the Standard Manufacturing Company consolidated with American Radiator and formed American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corporation. The plumbing division, Standard Sanitary, continued to manufacture and sell their products under the “Standard” label until 1967, when the company changed its name to American Standard Corporation. In 2007, American Standard broke up its three divisions (kitchen and bath; WABCO; and vehicle controls division) and the company’s name was changed to Trane Company. American Radiator continues to operate and manufactures radiator and other heating equipment.

American Radiator/American Standard Buffalo Facilities

American Radiator/American-Standard Buffalo Plants have a long and winding history. In 1881, Joseph Bond and John B. Pierce established the Pierce Steam Heating Company at 1741 Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo, New York. Pierce manufactured and sold steel boilers and cast iron radiators. The Elmwood facility included a large radiator foundry with machine shops and boiler works, and because it was located at the crossing of the New York Central Railroad tracks, its location was ideal for cost effective shipping and receiving. In 1892, Pierce merged independent manufacturers to form the American Radiator Company, and in 1929, the company merged with the Standard Sanitary Company to become American Standard, Inc.

In Buffalo, New York, there were six plants, which operated under the American Standard/ American Radiator Names:

» American Radiator Pierce Plant – 1741 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo

» American Radiator Company Bond Plant at 97 Rano Street in Buffalo

» American Radiator Company Standard Plant Warehouse – 44 Roseville Street, Buffalo

» American Radiator Institute for Thermal Research – 1807 Elmwood Avenue

» American Radiator Plant – 23 Austin Street Buffalo

» American Standard Plant as part of Tonawanda Iron & Steel – River Road, Tonawanda, New York

 

Asbestos in American Radiator and American-Standard Boilers and Furnaces

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford has represented numerous boilermakers, plumbers and HVAC personnel who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer as a result of their exposure to asbestos-containing materials associated with water or steam based boiler systems, as well as furnaces. Up until the late 1970s, numerous models of American Radiator

 

and American Standard residential and commercial boilers and furnaces contained asbestos insulation on both interior and exterior surfaces. Asbestos served as an excellent insulation material because of its durability and fire resistant properties. Asbestos insulation also allowed for boilers and furnaces to operate properly. Massive exposure to asbestos occurred when boilermakers, plumbers and/or HVAC personnel installed, maintained and removed residential and commercial boilers and furnaces.

Boilers manufactured by American Radiator were fueled by coal, oil, gas, or wood and produced steam or hot water, which was delivered to radiators through a system of pipes in order to heat a residence or small building. Up until the early 1960s, a round series residential boiler was often covered in inch thick asbestos insulation, otherwise known as asbestos shorts. Hot water or steam pipes associated with these boilers were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Square sectional boilers manufactured by American Radiator also contained corrugated air-cell asbestos lining to prevent radiation heat loss. Laborers who installed, repaired and maintained boilers manufactured by American Radiator were exposed to asbestos, which can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

American-Standard Furnaces

Up until the late 1970s, American-Standard incorporated asbestos-containing materials into residential and commercial furnaces. Residential furnaces that contained asbestos components include gravity furnaces and square-shaped forced air furnaces. Duct work and piping associated with both gravity and forced air furnaces were also insulated with or composed of asbestos materials. Individuals who installed, repaired, maintained and removed furnaces were exposed to asbestos, which can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In the process of representing boilermakers, plumbers, HVAC personnel and their families, our attorneys have gathered numerous medical and liability documents that could be instrumental in your legal representation. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease as a result of working with or around residential boilers and/or furnaces, contact us today for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Anchor Packing Company

Anchor Packing Company was founded in the early 1900s with locations in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Montreal, Canada. The company made asbestos-containing industrial sealing products. These products included anchor packings, asbestos-containing mitts and gloves, gaskets, brake linings and a variety of molded products. Asbestos was used in these products, due to its fireproof capabilities in high heat environments, until 1984. In 1987, three years after ceasing the use of asbestos, Anchor Packing Company became a subsidiary of Garlock Sealing Technologies.

Anchor Packing Company Asbestos-Containing Products

» Anchor Packing Gaskets (1909-1984)

» Anchor Packing (1908-1984)

» Anchor Packing Brake Linings (1908-1984)

» Anchor Packing Target Sheet Gaskets (1908-1984)

» Anchor Packing VY-Flex Ring Packing

»   Anchor Packing VY-Flex Spiral Packing

» Sheet Packing

»   Braided Packing

» Asbestos Cloth, Mitts and Gloves

» Asbestos rope, wick and cords

» Asbestos tape

Anchor Packing Company made and used a wide variety of asbestos- containing materials and products that put their own workers, and others who worked with their products at risk of asbestos exposure. Those who were in the vicinity of the installation, maintenance and removal of asbestos packing and gaskets are at risk. Occupations at

risk also include boiler workers, steamfitters, shipyard workers and power and chemical plant workers. The dangers of asbestos were widely known in the 1960s, but Anchor Packing continued to manufacture these products for 20 more years without disclosing that these products were hazardous.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by Anchor Packing Company. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were exposed to a product manufactured by Anchor Packing Company, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Armstrong World Industries, Inc.

Armstrong Cork is one of the nation’s oldest houseware manufacturers. The company was originally founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1860 by Thomas Armstrong, and the business quickly became well-known for its hand-carved corks. By the 1890’s Armstrong Cork was the world’s largest cork company. In 1891 the company incorporated as Armstrong, Brother and Company, Inc. and in 1893 Armstrong, Brother and Company purchased Lancaster Cork Works. In 1929 the company moved its headquarters to Lancaster, PA.

During the 1890s Armstrong expanded into foreign markets, opening sales offices in Montreal and Toronto, and in 1895 changed its corporate name to Armstrong Cork Company. The company expanded its product lines into floor covering in the early 20th  century as well as cork insulating board, other insulating materials, packaging closures, and gaskets. During the 1950s cork was largely replaced by chemicals and synthetics as the basis of the company’s products. In 1966 and 1967 Armstrong entered the carpet business and in 1968 Armstrong acquired furniture manufacturer Thomasville Furniture. In 1969 Armstrong divested itself of Armstrong Contracting and Supply Corporation, its insulationcontracting business, which changed its name to ACandS, Inc.

The company continued to grow throughout the 1970s and 1980s developing new types of resilient flooring, such as Solarian no-wax flooring. In 1980, the corporate name was changed to Armstrong World Industries, Inc to reflect its growing international operations and the fact that it was no longer

based on the cork business. Armstrong World Industries is headquartered in Lancaster, PA with manufacturing facilities in four continents and employs roughly eleven thousand people world-wide.

When in operation, Armstrong’s Fulton plant was located on New York State Route 481 in the town of Fulton, New York. In 1999, after Armstrong ceased the production of floor backing, ownership of the plant was transferred to Interface Solutions Incorporated. Today, Interface continues to operate its Fulton facility, employing roughly 350 residents of the Fulton/Oswego community. Prior to ceasing to operate, Armstrong Fulton manufactured floor backing and gasket materials. It is estimated that, every day, the Armstrong Fulton plant used between 150 to 200 tons of raw asbestos in its manufacturing processes. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

On a daily basis, pallets of asbestos bales were delivered to the Fulton plant by truck and rail. During the delivery process, these bales tore and ripped open, causing asbestos fibers to spill inside the plant. Employees at Armstrong, swept up raw asbestos from the plant’s floor with a power sweeper, causing clouds of fibers and dust to become airborne, which the employees subsequently inhaled.

Floor backing is a moisture-resistant, felt-like lining that is laid beneath floor boards and vinyl asbestos floor tile or linoleum tile. Workers at Armstrong manufactured floor backing by feeding raw asbestos through a series of pulpers, conveyers and batch tanks. In the process of pulping raw asbestos to create a slurry, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne and coated the plant’s equipment and machinery. The slurry was then fed through paper machines and formed into a sheet of paper with varying thicknesses. The asbestos felt paper was then sent to cure in large dryers. After the paper dried, it was sized into different diameter rolls. The rolls were transferred to storage and shipped by rail or truck. In the process of manufacturing the floor backing, large amounts of asbestos dust and fibers were emitted into the plant that the workers inhaled.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in Armstrong’s dayto-day plant operations. Asbestos-containing pipe covering lined steam and return lines. Asbestos cement and block insulation was applied to boilers. Hoods for dryers, used to cure floor backing, were lined with asbestos boards, which required frequent replacement. Due to normal wear and tear, these materials were removed and reapplied and, in the process, emitted dangerous levels of asbestos dust and fibers that contractors, maintenance personnel and workers inhaled.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at Armstrong’s Fulton facility. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Armstrong Fulton, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Auburn Plastics

Auburn Plastics, which was located in Auburn, New York, was originally established as Auburn Button Works in 1876 by John H. Woodruff. The company originally manufactured its products in Auburn’s post office located on Exchange Street. In 1900, the company moved its operations to 1900 Washington Street opposite Dunn & McCarthy. As the company’s product line moved into plastic molded materials, a much larger plant was purchased on Canoga Street in 1911. In the 1930s and 40s the company grew and began to expand its thermoplastic line. A second plant was purchased on 24 McMaster Street in order to accommodate the company’s growth during World War II. From the late 1800s up until the 1950s, Auburn Button Works manufactured pearl and shellac buttons, typewriter keys, butt plates for rifles, 78-rpm records, and a variety of other plastic goods. In 1957, Auburn Button Works changed its name to Auburn Plastics because the company stopped manufacturing buttons and continued to manufacture molded plastic products.

Individuals who worked at Auburn Plastics in Auburn have recently developed and died of mesothelioma as a result of their exposure to asbestos. Up until the late 1970’s, asbestos could be found as a component of high heat temperature, raw, plastic materials. Auburn Plastics utilized molding compounds that contained raw asbestos fibers. During the manufacturing process, workers were exposed to asbestos when they formed molded plastic parts for a variety of equipment, including pots and pans, cameras and typewriters. Asbestos was also incorporated into insulating materials that lined pipes and boilers at Auburn Plastics. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former and retired workers who were once employed at the Auburn Plastics a.k.a. Auburn Button Works in Auburn, NY. In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at Auburn Plastics in Auburn, NY and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to con- tact us regarding your legal rights.

Babcock & Wilcox

Babcock and Wilcox was founded in 1867 and is headquartered in Akron, Ohio. Babcock & Wilcox produced various types of equipment used to contain high temperatures and resist extreme heat. The equipment manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox was primarily used in power generation machinery, such as boiler systems and steam systems. This power generation machinery utilized asbestos for its heat resistant properties.

Babcock & Wilcox used the following asbestos-containing products: insulation, gaskets, heat seals, rope packing, block and millboard. These asbestos-containing products were then used in Babcock and Wilcox’s boilers, furnaces, power equipment, coal pulverizers and other types of refractory equipment that utilized high-temperatures.

Exposure to Babcock & Wilcox products occurred in jobsites, such as factories, that had a Babcock & Wilcox boiler. Workers who installed, repaired, and maintained these boilers, as well as workers in the nearby vicinity were at risk of asbestos exposure. Other workers who were at risk of asbestos exposure from Babcock & Wilcox products include the following: insulators, pipefitters, electricians, millwrights, plumbers, shipbuilders, shipyard workers, naval veterans and submarine crews.

WNY Jobsites

» Allied Chemical

» Allied Chemical (Buffalo, NY)

» Ashland Oil (Tonawanda, NY)

» Bethlehem Steel (Lackawanna, NY)

» Carborundum (Niagara Falls, NY)

» Chevrolet (Tonawanda, NY)

» Corning Glass (Corning, NY)

» Donner Hanna (Buffalo, NY)

» Dunlop (Black Rock, Buffalo, Tonawanda)

» Dupont (Tonawanda, NY)

» Durez (N. Tonawanda, NY)

» Hanna Furnace (Buffalo, NY)

» Harrison Radiator (Lockport, NY)

» Hooker Chemical (Niagara Falls, NY)

» Kodak (Rochester, NY)

» Niagara MohawkHuntley (Tonawanda, NY)

» Republic Steel (Buffalo, NY)

» Rochester Gas & Electric

» Semet Solvay (Ton. CokeTonawanda, NY)

» Simonds Saw & Steel (Guterl SteelLockport, NY)

» Sisters Hospital (Buffalo, NY)

» Carbide Graphite, Airco (Niagara Falls, NY)

» Union Carbide (Niagara Falls, NY)

» Union Carbide-Linde (Tonawanda, NY)

Babcock & Wilcox filed for bankruptcy in 2000. In connection with the bankruptcy reorganization, the company put aside money for current and future asbestos victims in a bankruptcy settlement trust.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were exposed to a product manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Batavia School for the Blind a.k.a. New York State School for the Blind

The Batavia School for the Blind was founded in 1868. It was renamed the New York State (NYS) School for the Blind in 1929. The School for the Blind aimed to provide public education for blind children utilizing an adapted curriculum to meet their special needs. Since its inception, the school has grown and evolved into providing specialized instruction and clinical and related support services that are tailored to each student.

The School for the Blind’s original school building was built in 1868 and demolished in 1940. As the school continued to grow into a campus, new buildings were constructed. In the 1960s, a new dormitory building, Knight Hall, a heating plant and a motor vehicle complex were constructed. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970’s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Many trades, including carpenters, plasterers, fire proofers, pipe coverers, plumbers, insulators and boilermakers helped to construct these buildings. Throughout the Batavia School for the Blind, asbestos-containing materials insulated pipes and ducts, boilers and structural steel throughout various buildings on its campus. Laborers and tradesmen hired to apply, remove or work in the vicinity of these building materials may have been exposed to asbestos dust. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those not who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at the New York State School for the Blind were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of the School for the Blind and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bath VA Medical Center

The Bath Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center was founded in 1879 as the New York State Soldiers and Sailors Home. It was established to care for Union veterans of the Civil War. In 1929, the United States government took control of the facility, and in 1930, the medical center was incorporated into the newly formed Veterans Administration. The Bath VA Medical Center is located on Veterans Avenue in Bath, New York, and it consists of over thirty buildings on 215 acres. It is a 440-bed hospital that offers inpatient and outpatient care to United States military veterans.

Asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, packing material and gaskets were used in maintenance and repair procedures at the Bath VA Medical Center. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used to heat the buildings at the Bath VA Medical Center. Boilers, pipes, valves and pumps within the steam system were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. During maintenance or repair procedures, workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment within the system. New insulation was applied after maintenance or repairs took place. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were used in pipe systems at the Bath VA Medical Center to ensure a proper seal between pipe flanges, valves or pumps. Gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Cutting gasket materials emitted asbestos dust into the air. When a gasket was replaced, it was scraped off its flange. Removing gaskets also released asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

Workers utilized asbestos-containing packing material to prevent leaks from pump shafts and valve stems. Packing material was commonly removed from pump and valve glands using a tool called a packing puller. Workers cut and manipulated new packing material to fit the diameter of the stem or shaft. Removing and installing packing material emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for the Bath VA Medical Center were employed by various contractors throughout the Finger Lakes Region. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with maintenance or renovation of the Bath VA Medical Center and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you contact us regarding your legal rights.

Beech-Nut

Beech-Nut Packing Company was founded in 1891 and is located in Canajoharie, New York in the Mohawk Valley. Beech-Nut was first named Imperial Packing Company. It became a major producer of baby food. Raymond P. Lipe, along with his friend John

  1. Zieley and their brothers, Walter H. Lipe and David Zieley, and Bartlett Arkell, founded The Imperial Packing Co. for the production of Beech-Nut ham. The product was based on the smoked hams of the Lipes’ father, farmer Ephraim Lipe. Beech-Nut was known for making food products, originally producing ham, dried beef and lard for the first several years.

The company was incorporated as the Beech-Nut Packing Company in 1899. Arkell was the first president of the company. In 1900, the company’s sales were $200,000. Engineers from Beech-Nut patented the first vacuum jar, with a design that included a gasket and top that could remain intact in transit and became a standard of the industry. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation is now owned by the Swiss branded consumer-goods firm Hero Group.

Workers at Beech-Nut were at risk of asbestos exposure during their employment. At the Beech-Nut facility, asbestos insulation materials were used on pipes, boilers, ovens, pumps, gaskets, packing and valves. Contractors who worked at Beech-Nut were at rick of asbestos exposure while performing construction and maintaining these facilities. These workers include carpenters, pipefitters, insulators, electricians, millwrights and other construction and maintenance workers.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began its assessment of the former Beech-Nut site in 2015, when it was found that “there was extensive asbestos contamination, including a numerous outdoor debris piles left behind after prior demolition” of the facility. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation and B&B Recycling refused to comply with an EPA Superfund order that required asbestos removal work, so in 2017 the EPA and Montgomery County entered into a voluntary agreement to address the hazardous asbestos contamination at the site. You can read the EPA’s News Release from Region 02 here. A resolution was passed by the Montgomery County Legislatures to enter into an administrative settlement agreement and an order on consent for removal action with the EPA to start the cleanup of the 2,532.3 tons of hazardous material from the former Beech-Nut site. Read the article from The Leader Herald about the Beech-Nut clean up here – Beech-Nut clean up set to start | News, Sports, Jobs – Leader Herald.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Beech-Nut. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at Beech-Nut, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bendix Plant, Elmira, NY

The Bendix Plant in Elmira, NY was an engineering company that began with an agreement between founder Vincent Bendix and Eclipse Machine Company in 1914 to produce Bendix’s automotive starter. Bendix Corporation acquired control of Eclipse Machine Company in 1928, and in 1929 the company changed its focus to aviation products

and changed its name to Bendix Aviation Corporation. General Motors was a major shareholder of Bendix from 1928-1948, and during this time period Bendix produced millions of brakes each year, primarily for General Motors.

Bendix made items such as, starters, automotive brake shoes and systems, electric power systems and aircraft brakes, however, it is best-known for its development and manufacture of brake pads. In 1982 Bendix attempted a hostile takeover of Martin Marietta Corporation. This takeover failed and led to Bendix’s acquisition by Allied Corporation in 1983. In 1985 Allied Corporation combined with the Signal Companies, later renamed to AlliedSignal in 1993. 1999 the Allied Signal Corporation merged with the Honeywell Group. Today, the corporation continues to operate under the name Honeywell International.

Bendix utilized asbestos in their brake and clutch equipment. Asbestos was a desirable material because it’s heat resistant properties made friction products more durable. Bendix brakes were lined with asbestos-containing materials. Brake work from long-term wear and tear of the brake pads released large amounts of asbestos particles into the air.

Bendix Plant factory workers, engineers, automotive workers, as well as mechanics who worked on Bendix brakes and clutches were at risk of exposure to Bendix’s asbestos-containing products. Factory workers at Bendix

were at risk of exposure to asbestos while they worked at the plant. Mechanics were at risk of exposure to Bendix’s asbestos products during the maintenance, repair and replacement of Bendix asbestos-containing brakes.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Bendix. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at Bendix, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bethlehem Steel

In recent years, former employees of Bethlehem Steel have developed and died of  mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Individuals who worked in the steel industry were at high risk for exposure to asbestos and coke oven emissions. Asbestos was utilized throughout the Bethlehem Steel Lackawanna Plant and could also be found in workers’ protective clothing. Workers who handled asbestos materials or were in the vicinity of others who did were at a high risk for injurious exposure, and at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos dust and fibers.

In addition to asbestos exposure, those who worked on top of, or alongside coke oven batteries are at a substantially increased risk for developing lung cancer and other cancers. Coke oven emissions are composed of gases and dust which are harmful to your lungs and skin.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning coke oven emissions and the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Bethlehem Steel in Lackawanna, NY and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Boise Cascade Corporation

In the 1960s, Boise operated concrete plants, plastic manufacturing plants, textiles and sand and gravel companies. In 1970 Boise’s current headquarters were built. However, with the promotion of John Ferry as Boise’s new CEO in 1972, Boise returned to its main operation of building materials and paper products.

Employees at Boise’s plants, as well as con- struction workers, and other laborers and users of Boise products were at risk of exposure to asbestos. Asbestos insulated equipment throughout Boise plants, such as pumps, pipes and valves. Additionally, Boise products, such as insulating paper, wood products, laminate flooring, boards and paper products contained asbestos. Anyone who worked with, installed, or repaired Boise asbestos-containing products is at risk of asbestos exposure.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by Boise Cascade Corporation. If you or a loved one were exposed to a product asbestos at Boise Cascade Corporation or as a result of using Boise products, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

BorgWarner, Inc.

Library of Congress photo – see #1 below

BorgWarner, Inc. was founded in 1928 and manufactured automobile parts. BorgWarner was headquartered in Auburn Hills, Michigan and continues to make automobile parts today.

BorgWarner manufactured the following asbestos-containing products:

» Brake pads

» Brake shoes

»   Clutch pads

»   Clutch discs

BorgWarner employees, as well as automotive employees, mechanics, warehouse workers and people who did their own brake work using BorgWarner asbestos-containing products are at high risk for exposure to asbestos; as the company manufactured and supplied asbestos-containing brake pads from 1971 through 1975. BorgWarner also manufactured asbestos clutches through the 1980’s. Asbestos was used in many automotive parts (such as BorgWarner’s brakes and clutches) because of its ability to insulate against high temperatures and prevent fires. Friction products, like brakes and clutches, utilized asbestos so that they would not overheat.

These products were used in automotive shops throughout the United States, exposing mechanics and other workers to asbestos. Additionally, BorgWarner sold its asbestos-containing products to General Motors. This put General Motors workers at high risk for exposure to asbestos.

BorgWarner had manufacturing locations throughout the world, however two of these facilities were located in New York State. These locations were in Cortland, NY and Ithaca, NY.

BorgWarner has been the subject of thousands of lawsuits by workers who have developed asbestos-related diseases, such as lung cancer and mesothelioma. These lawsuits have cost BorgWarner millions of dollars; in fact, the company had to explore divesture, or selling off its subsidiary business interests or investments, in order to avoid bankruptcy. This resulted in the company putting aside millions of dollars so it can cover existing and future asbestos claims.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured at BorgWarner. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at BorgWarner or by using BorgWarner products, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo Acoustical

Buffalo Acoustical was established in 1955 by Thomas George and Russell Walsh. Laborers who were employed by Buffalo Acoustical installed asbestos-containing ceiling tiles and sprayed-on acoustical insulation. Buffalo Acoustical held a franchise agreement with National Gypsum and used some of their building products. In 1968, Buffalo Acoustical merged with the Mader Corporation, a building contractor that, up until the late 1970s, applied asbestos containing fireproofing and acoustical materials. Today the company is based in Elma, New York and is known as Mader Construction Company, Inc.

Up until the late 1970s asbestos-containing materials were widely used in the construction industry. Buffalo Acoustical applied acoustical materials throughout many buildings in Western New York. Acoustical ceiling tiles and sprayed-on acoustical materials were applied in both industrial and commercial buildings, such as the Pohlman Foundry and Kleinhans Music Hall.   Acoustical ceiling tiles were used in office and commercial buildings, including Marine Midland Center (HSBC Tower), Donovan Building, Niagara Mohawk’s offices, Tops Markets and Thruway Lanes. Many former employees of Buffalo Acoustical and the Mader Corporation have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Workers applied asbestos-containing building materials without the knowledge that asbestos could cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing sprayed-on acoustical materials were applied to wall and/or ceiling surfaces in order to limit sound; provide fireproofing; and to provide thermal insulation. Thermacoustic was the National Gypsum trade name for the sprayed on material that was utilized by some workers of Buffalo Acoustical. Acoustical materials were applied to the ceilings and walls at Kleinhans Music Hall in order to reduce sound reverberation during performances. The same acoustical materials were also applied in the finishing department of the Pohlman Foundry in order to protect the walls from fire and damage from the manufacturing process. Acoustical materials were manufactured as a dry powder, mixed with water and sprayed onto ceiling or wall surfaces. During the application process of acoustical materials, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where the material was being applied. Even long after this material was applied, the smallest vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing acoustical materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Acoustical (drop or suspended) ceiling tiles are commonly found in commercial and residential buildings. Prior to the late 1970’s, most acoustical ceiling tiles contained asbestos. Incorporating asbestos into ceiling tiles provided fire resistance and sound absorption.

Acoustical ceiling tiles were used in order to conceal HVAC ducts, electrical wires and plumbing. Acoustical ceiling tiles were typically suspended from wires or placed into a metal grid T-bar system that dropped about one foot below the underside of a ceiling. Some asbestos containing ceiling tiles were merely stapled or nailed into the underside of the floor above, and others were hung by a system of interlocking panels. Regardless of the system employed, it was often necessary for laborers to cut the ceiling tiles to fit around irregular parts of the ceiling. Laborers, including carpenters, also kerfed (groove cut) tile so that ceiling tiles could properly fit into a spline or supporting members of a ceiling suspension system. Simply handling acoustical ceiling tiles produced asbestos-containing dust, and cutting or kerfing the ceiling tiles created a tremendous amount of asbestos dust that workers inhaled.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by employees of Buffalo Acoustical and the Mader Corporation. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Buffalo Acoustical and/or the Mader Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo Electric

Established in 1898 as McCarthy Brothers & Ford, Buffalo Electric was a major electrical contractor in Upstate New York for nearly a century. In addition to electrical contracting, Buffalo Electric also performed electrical motor repair and control panel fabrication at its workshop on West Mohawk Street in Buffalo, New York. Electricians employed by Buffalo Electric were members of Local 41 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. In 1991, the company went out of business. During its ninety-three year history, Buffalo Electric performed construction and repairs at many industrial and commercial locations in Western New York, including Bethlehem Steel, General Motors plants, Niagara Mohawk power stations and substations, Ashland Oil, Donner Hanna Coke, Republic Steel, M & T Plaza, Marine Midland Center and American Brass.

Up until the late 1970s, electricians employed by Buffalo Electric were exposed to asbestos containing materials during installation and maintenance and repairs on electrical equipment. Many types of electrical equipment contained asbestos, such as motor starters, contactors, arc chutes and circuit breakers. Buffalo Electric employees were also exposed to asbestos-containing building materials applied by other tradesmen. Fireproof insulation, joint compound, ceiling tiles, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation contained asbestos. Additionally, asbestos-containing materials were utilized during the manufacturing processes at industrial job sites where Buffalo Electric’s electricians often worked. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

During regular operation, electrical components inside motor starters, circuit breakers and contactors opened and closed forcefully. Over time, wear and tear caused the asbestos-containing plastic that made up the body of these components to produce dust that settled in the bottom of the control cabinet or panel box. Arc chutes, which were designed to absorb stray arcs of electricity when electrical contacts are opened and closed, shed small amounts of asbestos-containing plastic each time the contacts were operated. When electricians opened the cabinet or box in order to perform repairs or maintenance, asbestos-containing dust became airborne, which workers inhaled.

At commercial and industrial job sites, Buffalo Electric employees worked side-by-side with pipefitters, carpenters, insulators and other tradesmen. During a building’s initial construction, structural steel was typically covered with asbestos fireproof insulation. Electricians often disturbed the fireproof material in order to hang conduit, lighting or other electrical equipment. Steam, water or chemical pipes covered with asbestos-containing insulation were frequently located in the same areas that electrical conduit was installed. At some industrial job sites, such as Durez Plastics, Bethlehem Steel and Hooker Chemical, electricians were exposed to asbestos-containing materials used in the manufacturing process, including raw asbestos, refractory materials and plastic molding compounds. During commercial construction projects, electricians were often present when asbestos-containing joint compound was applied and sanded. Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles were also installed during the same time that electricians installed light fixtures. Installing or disturbing asbestos-containing materials caused asbestos fibers to become airborne, which Buffalo Electric employees inhaled. Many workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by employees of Buffalo Electric. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Buffalo Electric and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo General Hospital

Buffalo General Hospital was founded in 1858 by several local doctors and businessmen. On June 24, 1858, former President of the United States Millard Fillmore presided over the dedication ceremony. Located on High Street in Buffalo, New York, Buffalo General was the first hospital in the state of New York, outside of New York City, to use mercury thermometers, hypodermic injections and x-ray machines. Throughout its over 150 year history, Buffalo General Hospital has undergone numerous building expansions and renovations. With 511 beds, it is one of the largest hospitals in Western New York. Buffalo General Hospital also serves as the primary teaching hospital for the University of Buffalo’s School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used during the construction of Buffalo General. Fireproof insulation, joint compound, ceiling tiles, floor tiles, packing material, block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement were used in the construction and maintenance of the hospital. Inhaling dust and particles from applying or removing asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Construction and renovation projects at Buffalo General Hospital involved many trades, including electricians, carpenters, pipefitters, insulators, plasterers and laborers. Structural steel was covered with asbestos-containing fireproof insulation in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Joint compound sealed seams between sheets of drywall, and it covered nail and screw holes in the drywall. Joint compound was applied and sanded in order to create a smooth surface for paint application. Asbestos-containing ceiling and floor tiles were installed throughout the hospital. Asbestos was incorporated into ceiling and floor tiles because of its inherent strength and resistance to fire. Steam and hot water pipes were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement, in order to protect the pipes and to provide a stable internal temperature within plumbing systems. Asbestos block insulation was applied to ventilation ducts and steam boilers, which provided increased efficiency to the heating and cooling systems. Pump shafts and valve stems were sealed with asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material in order to prevent water or steam from leaking out of the equipment.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Buffalo General Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Buffalo General Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo Savings Bank

Buffalo Savings Bank was established in 1846, and it was the first savings bank in the City of Buffalo. In 1901, its headquarters opened on the corner of Main and East Huron Streets in Downtown Buffalo. The bank’s headquarters became known for its massive copper-clad dome roof, which, in 1954, was covered in gold leaf. After several mergers and acquisitions in the early 1980’s, Buffalo Savings Bank became Goldome in 1983. After several years of financial difficulty for the bank, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation closed Goldome in 1991 and divided its assets between its local competitors. At the time, it was the sixth largest bank failure in American history. The Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company (M & T) took possession of the former Goldome headquarters in Buffalo.

Asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used during construction and maintenance procedures at Buffalo Savings Bank. In recent years, workers who assisted in the construction of Buffalo Savings Bank have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel throughout Buffalo Savings Bank in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Fireproofing material was manufactured as a dry mixture of cement, asbestos and linen, and it was packaged in heavy paper bags. Workers dumped fireproofing material into a machine, where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel. This process produced clouds of asbestos-containing dust, which workers inhaled.

Workers also utilized asbestos-containing materials in order to insulate the steam heating system at Buffalo Savings Bank. Steam and hot water pipes were insulated with asbestos containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos block insulation covered steam boilers in order to ensure the efficient operation of the heating system. Gaps between lengths of block insulation on the boilers were covered with asbestos-containing insulating cement. When asbestos-containing materials were removed or applied, asbestos fibers became airborne.

Additionally, asbestos was incorporated into floor tiles, ceiling tiles and joint compound at Buffalo Savings Bank. Joint compound was applied to the seams between sheets of drywall. After it dried, it was sanded to a smooth surface. Sanding joint compound emitted asbestos dust into the breathing zone of workers. Handling, cutting and installing ceiling tiles and floor tiles also caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Buffalo Savings Bank were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Buffalo Savings Bank and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo VA Medical Center

The Buffalo Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center was established in 1950 in order to provide medical care to United States military veterans in Western New York. Located on Bailey Avenue in Buffalo, the VA Medical Center is a 12-story, 199-bed hospital that provides inpatient and outpatient care to veterans. The Buffalo VA Medical Center is the main referral center within the Department of Veterans Affairs for cardiac surgery and cancer treatment in Central and Western New York.

Dozens of asbestos-containing materials were used during the construction and maintenance of the Buffalo VA Medical Center, including fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and acoustic plaster. Workers who applied, removed or maintained asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel at the Buffalo VA Medical Center in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Asbestos was incorporated into fireproofing because of its fire-resistant properties. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mixture, and it was packaged in large paper bags. Dry fireproofing material was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. Spraying and mixing fireproof insulation emitted clouds of asbestos-containing dust and fibers, which workers inhaled. Tradesmen, such as carpenters and pipefitters, also scraped fireproofing from the structural steel in order to install framing studs or pipes.

In order to decrease sound levels within the hospital, workers applied asbestos-containing acoustic plaster to the ceilings and walls. Acoustic plaster was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water in a bucket or tub, in order to prepare it for application. Mixing acoustic plaster released asbestos fibers, which become airborne.

The VA Medical Center was heated by steam produced in boilers. Asbestos-containing insulation was applied to boilers, pumps, valves and pipes within the steam system. Workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment during maintenance and repair procedures. When these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation released asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for the Buffalo VA Medical Center were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction or maintenance of the Buffalo VA Medical Center and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Burrows Paper Corporation

Burrows Paper Corporation started its manufacturing in 1919, when Andrew Burrows purchased the first paper mill in Little Falls, New York. A generation later, under Ralph Burrows, the company expanded by purchasing three additional mills. Years later Bill Burrows led the company into another expansion entering into the use of lightweight packaging. In 2016 Burrows Paper Corporation sold its packaging division operations to Novolex and its paper division operations to Twin Rivers Paper Co.

The company has an international presence, with paper mills and packaging facilities in several countries. The paper products produced by the company include many food service packaging solutions, this includes grease resistant wrapping and paper bags for various food items. Burrows manufactures paper products for medical, industrial and consumer markets as well.

The paper making process uses many pieces of equipment throughout the plant that need to operate under high heat. Since the process involves such high temperatures, many insulating processes that involved the use of asbestos were commonly found throughout paper mills. Often during the paper making process the worker would become covered in dust. This dust usually came from dryer felts, a part of the paper drying process where fine particulate is blown off or removed from the newly crafted sheets of paper.

Burrows Paper Corporation operated several paper mills throughout New York State. Employees who worked at these mills have been diagnosed with cancers caused by exposure to asbestos. Inhaling dust and airborne particles from exposure to insulation of raw asbestos fibers put workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Paper mill workers were not aware of the hazards of exposure to insulation materials containing asbestos when they performed their job duties without wearing protective gear. Even those who might not have been in direct contact with asbestos insulation but worked in the vicinity still remain at risk.

If you or a loved one worked at Burrows Paper Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact Lipsitz, Ponterio and Comerford, LLC to learn how we can help you and your family.

B.F. Goodrich Company

In 1940, the B. F. Goodrich Company constructed a chemical factory on 53rd  Street in Niagara Falls, New York, in order to produce its proprietary Geon polyvinyl chloride resin. The Niagara Falls plant employed around fifty people, and it closed in 1971.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of insulation and building materials utilized at the Niagara Falls B.F. Goodrich facility. Outside asbestos insula- tion contractors were typically hired to perform maintenance procedures at B.F. Goodrich. Asbestos insulation contractors, as well as B.F. Goodrich employees, were exposed to asbestos-containing materials when asbestos materials were applied and/or removed. Workers who handled asbestos materials, or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did, are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Laborers who worked for contractors routinely performed work on heat exchangers and steam pipes. Laborers removed worn asbestos insulation and replaced it with new asbestos pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement in order to insulate the steam pipes and chemical lines. This type of work created an extremely dusty environment, and contractors, as well as B.F. Goodrich employees were not aware of the dangers of asbestos exposure and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked at B.F. Goodrich Chemical Company in Niagara Falls, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

BASF

The BASF plant in Rensselaer was established in 1882 as the Hudson River Aniline Color Works. The building that was erected in 1882 was the sole building for the plant and served as its production, engineering and administrative facility until 1895, when a fire burned the building to the ground. The main plant building was rebuilt shortly after the fire in 1895. By the early 1900s, the Rensselaer facility was well known for the manufacture of dyes, coal tar, benzene and other chemicals. During its 118 year history, the BASF-Rensselaer underwent numerous mergers, reorganizations, and management and name changes. Most notably, the Rensselaer facility was taken over by the United States government in 1917 when the U.S. declared war on Germany because at this time, the plant was owned by German investors. Following WWI, the plant returned to private ownership, but it was once again seized by the Federal Government during World War II. In 1978, the plant was acquired by BASF, a German chemical company. BASF continued to manufacture dyes and chemicals from 1978 until the plant closed its doors in 2000, when its production lines were transferred to Mexico and Germany.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the manufacture of dyes and chemicals, as well as plant maintenance at BASF in Rensselaer, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at BASF Rensselaer, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bath Iron Works

The Bath Iron Works Shipyard was established in Bath, Maine in 1888. Historically, the shipyard has produced everything from U.S. Navy Ships to modern warships and private yachts. However, former employees of Bath Iron Works are at high risk for asbestos diseases, such as lung cancer and mesothelioma.

Throughout the twentieth century, employees of Bath Iron Works endured significant asbestos exposure as a result of their work at the shipyard.

This exposure resulted from the boilers, pipes and turbines throughout the ships that were insulated with asbestos. Other sources of asbestos exposure at the shipyard included equipment such as gaskets, fireproofing, cement and other electrical equipment.

During World War II, Bath Iron Works was at the height of its production building Navy Destroyers. Bath Iron Works was known for its quality product and fast work. Asbestos was heavily used in the construction of these ships, especially in the engine and boiler rooms. Asbestos was an important part of fireproofing vessels below deck, and these steam powered ships required large amounts of asbestos insulation.

Workers at Bath Iron works, including pipefitters, insulators, electricians, welders and those in their vicinity were exposed to asbestos during the construction and maintenance of vessels at Bath Iron Works. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Bath Iron Works. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at Bath Iron Works, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bausch & Lomb

Bausch & Lomb was founded in 1853 when John Jacob Bausch opened a small optical goods shop in Rochester, NY. Bausch and Lomb began with the creation of rubber eyeglass frames and went on to patent binoculars, microscopes and other items such as a camera shutter. Bausch & Lomb is best known for its novel optical products.

In 1966 Bausch & Lomb began to make and sell contact lenses. These contact lenses were made from a fluid-absorbing hydrophilic plastic. By 1973, Bausch & Lomb’s Softlens contact lens sales were responsible for half of the company’s revenue.

Bausch & Lomb had many locations throughout Rochester, NY. Outside contractors who worked at these locations were at risk of asbestos exposure while performing construction and maintaining these facilities. These workers include carpenters, pipefitters, insulators, electricians, millwrights and other construction and maintenance workers.

Asbestos exposure at Bausch & Lomb may have occurred in the following ways:

» Exposure to joint compound and drywall;

» Exposure to ceiling tiles during office renovations;

» Exposure to pipe covering and insulating cement;

» Exposure to asbestos paper.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Bausch & Lomb. If you or a loved one were exposed to asbestos at Bausch & Lomb, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bell Aerospace

In 1941, the Bell Aircraft Company constructed an aircraft manufacturing plant in Wheatfield, New York. Due to the numerous wars raging around the world at the time, the United States government provided the funding for this vital facility. Located at the corner of Niagara Falls Boulevard and Walmore Road, the plant consisted of fifty buildings on eighty acres of land, with a total of over 1.8 million square feet of floor area. The Bell Wheatfield plant manufactured fighter aircraft for the Allies during World War II. The P-39 Airacobra, the most successful American-made fighter during the war, was manufactured in Wheatfield, and it was put to great use by Soviet pilots. Bell also developed the first American jet airplane, the P-59 Airacomet, in Wheatfield during the war.

During its peak production years, Bell employed nearly 28,000 people at its Wheatfield plant. After World War II ended, the plant manufactured helicopters, missiles, experimental airplanes and various components for space exploration. The first aircraft to break the sound barrier, the Bell X-1, was also manufactured in Wheatfield. Bell moved its helicopter manufacturing operation to Fort Worth, Texas, in 1951 due to a better climate for flying and a friendlier labor environment. In 1960, Bell was acquired by Textron, and the company was renamed Bell Aerospace Textron. Over the next several decades, the Bell Wheatfield plant’s production output declined due to increased competition in defense manufacturing and difficult economic conditions in Western New York. In the years that followed, Bell Aerospace Textron gradually sold its product lines to various defense contractors, and in 1994, operations ceased at the Wheatfield facility with the sale of its missile guidance production line to Loral Corporation.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance of buildings at Bell Aerospace’s Wheatfield plant. Pipe covering, insulating cement, gaskets and block insulation contained asbestos. Inhaling dust from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used during manufacturing processes, and it was also used to heat buildings throughout the facility. A network of pipes delivered steam to radiators and manufacturing equipment. Boilers, pumps, valves and pipes were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. Workers who performed maintenance within the steam system removed asbestos insulation in order to gain access to the equipment. When these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. The process of removing and applying insulation to equipment in the steam system caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at Bell, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bennett High School

Bennett High School was established in 1925 as a public school in the Buffalo City School District. It was named for Lewis J. Bennett, who donated the land for the school. Located on Main Street in the University Heights neighborhood, Bennett High School is a four-story, 270,000 square foot building that enrolls around 1,100 students per year. Bennett High School offers a full Regents curriculum, with a focus on college preparatory studies in law, technology and the arts.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used during the construction and maintenance of Bennett High School. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Several renovations have taken place at Bennett High School. During these renovations, workers may have been exposed to asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation, floor tiles, window caulk, fireproofing materials and other asbestos-containing materials.

Steam pipes throughout Bennett High School were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering. Block insulation and insulating cement covered steam boilers, exhaust breechings and ventilation ducts. Vinyl asbestos floor tiles were used in many areas of the high school, including classrooms. Windows were sealed with asbestos-containing caulk, and fireproof insulation covered the structural steel. Due to wear and tear, these materials were removed and reapplied. When contractors or maintenance personnel removed and reapplied asbestos-containing insulation, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from cutting or applying asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even individuals who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Bennett High School in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bliss & Laughlin Steel

Bliss & Laughlin Steel was originally founded in 1891 in Harvey, Illinois. In 1929, Bliss & Laughlin constructed a bar mill in Buffalo in order to manufacture steel bars. The steel mill’s location enabled Bliss & Laughlin to provide easier access to markets on the East Coast. Located on Hopkins Street in South Buffalo, the mill manufactures cold drawn steel bars used in many products, including automobiles, construction equipment, farming machinery and household appliances. Bliss & Laughlin closed its mill during a strike in 1971, and in 1972, the mill was acquired and reopened by Ramco Steel. After Ramco went bankrupt in 1985, the mill was taken over by Niagara Cold Drawn Corporation. In 1997, Niagara acquired Lasalle Corporation and was renamed Niagara-Lasalle. Today, the mill is a single, 130,000 square foot building, and it employs around 150 people. It continues to manufacture cold drawn steel bars used in various industries.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at Bliss & Laughlin Steel in Buffalo, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at Bliss & Laughlin Steel and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we can help. We urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Bondex International, Inc.

History: Bondex International was founded in 1959 by its parent company, the Reardon Company, when it registered Bondex’s trademark. The company is located in Medina County, Ohio. In 1966, the Reardon Company was acquired by Republic Powdered Metals, more

commonly known as RPM, Inc. RPM, Inc.’s name was changed to SPHC in 2010 prior to filing for bankruptcy protection to avoid confusion with RPM International.

The original corporate name of Specialty Products Holding Corp. (“SPHC”) was Republic Powdered Metals, Inc., which was incorporated in Ohio in 1947. In 1972, Republic Powdered Metals, Inc. changed its name to RPM, Inc. and created two subsidiaries for its two businesses. The two new subsidiaries were named Republic Powdered Metals, Inc. (“Republic”), which engaged in the roofing business, and Bondex International, Inc. (“Bondex”), which had an asbestos-containing joint compound as one of its products.

Bondex was a major participant in the building materials industry. Bondex made joint compound, putties, finishes, cements, paints, patching compounds, and other products. These products were used in residential, commercial, and industrial sites.

Initially Bondex targeted its products as do-ityourself items for home use. However, Bondex products were also used  at  commercial sites. Bondex workers were at risk of asbestos exposure during the manufacture of Bondex products. Other workers at risk of exposure to Bondex products include construction workers, drywall tapers, demolition workers, masons, roofers, handymen, factory workers and general laborers.

Other Brand Names for Bondex:

» Reardon

» Penncraft (sold at J.C. Penney)

» Dramex

» Trax

» Wards (sold at Montgomery Ward)

» Metro

Bondex Asbestos Products:

» Joint compounds

» All Purpose Joint Topping

» Interior Finish

»   Patchers

» Putties

» Mobile Home Roof Coating

» Roof Cement

» Roof Coating

»   Coating -Plaster

Specific Bondex Brand Products Include:

» Bondex Red-I-Mix Joint Cement

»   Bondex “Premium Joint Compound”

»   Bondex 100-A All Purpose Joint Cement

»   Bondex 200-B All Purpose Joint Cement

»   Bondex 500-C All Purpose Joint Cement

»   Bondex All Purpose Joint Cement

» Bondex Alumanation

» Bondex Alumanation 350

» Bondex Alumanation Aluminum Roof Coating (1967-1981)

» Bondex Aluminum Roof Coating

»   Bondex Bondek Black Mastic

» Bondex Bondek Roof Cement

»   Bondex Cooks LifeLine All Purpose Cement

»   Bondex Cooks LifeLine All Purpose Texture

» Bondex Cooks Texture Joint Cement

» Bondex Dramex Texture Paint

» Bondex FO Pierce Dramex

» Bondex Formula

» Bondex GSA Joint Compound

»   Bondex Handy Patch All Purpose Patcher

» Bondex Hi & Dri Joint Cement

» Bondex Hi & Dri Topping Cement

» Bondex Joint Cement

» Bondex Joint Compound

» Bondex Joint Topping Texture Paint

» Bondex Metro Spanish Texture Paint

» Bondex Mobil Home Aluminum Roof Coating

» Bondex Mobile Home Roof Coating

»   Bondex Multi-Patch

»   Bondex NPD All Purpose Joint Cement

» Bondex NPD Joint Cement Combination

» Bondex NPD SX Joint Cement

» Bondex Our Best Grade Joint Cement

»   Bondex Patching Plaster

»   Bondex Penncraft Block Filler

» Bondex Penncraft Joint Cement

»   Bondex Penncraft Pre-Mixed Joint Cement

» Bondex Penncraft Water Putty

» Bondex PermaRoof

»   Bondex Premium Joint Compound

»   Bondex Pre-Mixed Joint Cement

» Bondex Products

» Bondex Ready-Mixed Joint Cement

»   Bondex Reardons All Purpose Joint Cement

»   Bondex Reardons All Purpose Patcher

» Bondex Reardons SX Joint Cement

» Bondex Reardons SX Topping Cement

» Bondex Reardons Texture Paint

» Bondex Reardons Water Putty

» Bondex Roof Cement

» Bondex Roof Coating

» Bondex SX Joint Cement

» Bondex SX Topping Cement

» Bondex Tape Joint Kit

» Bondex Textured Paint

» Bondex Trax Joint Cement

» Bondex Trax Texture Paint

» Bondex Trax Topping Cement

» Bondex Wards Wood Putty Bondex Water Putty

On May 31, 2010, Bondex and its holding company, Specialty Products Holding Corp., filed for bankruptcy as a result of thousands of asbestos lawsuits. In 2016, The Bondex Asbestos Personal Injury Trust was established as a result of the company filing for bankruptcy to ensure asbestos victims and their families would be compensated. We are one of the few law firms operating in the area of mesothelioma litigation that has our own staff that handles Bankruptcy claims and Workers’ Compensation benefits on behalf of our mesothelioma clients. It is our goal to obtain for you the maximum available economic recovery, and sometimes this is done through a combination of recovery from a lawsuit and other administrative benefits.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information about the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by Bondex Corporation. Our firm. If you or a loved one were exposed to an asbestos product at Bondex Corporation or as a result of using Bondex products, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Brooklyn Navy Yard

Originally used after the American Revolution as a site for building merchant vessels, the Brooklyn Navy Yard was purchased by the United States government in 1801, and became an active U.S. Navy shipyard in 1806. Since its inception, the Brooklyn Navy Yard has gone through several name changes, including New York Navy Yard, United States Navy Yard and the New York Naval Ship Yard. The Brooklyn Navy Yard has since made its mark in United States history as a key builder of ships that have been used for the wars in which the U.S. fought until 1966, when the Navy Yard was closed after production slowed and a devastating fire.

Similar to many naval yards, the Brooklyn Navy Yard experienced a production boom prior to and during World War II, as war efforts demanded the rapid manufacture of equipment, ammunitions and vessels. During the Civil War, the Yard served as a key depot for the distribution of supplies to the Union fleet. One of the first ships constructed at the Brooklyn Navy Yard was the USS Ohio, followed by the USS Maine, which was launched and commissioned in 1895. Three years later, the Maine was sunk, leading to the beginning of the SpanishAmerican War.

World War I sparked an employment boom at the Yard, increasing the workforce from 8,000 to 18,000. It was at this time that the USS Arizona was built, and became known as one of the biggest and most powerful ships ever built at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The Arizona was bombed and sunk at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, engaging the United States in World War II. During World War II, the workforce at the Yard reached its peak and expanded to 70,000 employees, and for the first time, women were hired to work at the Yard as mechanics and technicians. Because of the booming employment opportunities, the Yard also became an extensive facility that included a power plant, radio station, railroad spur, and two steel shipways, as well as six pontoons. From the end of World War II until the early 1960s the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched and commissioned an additional 30 naval vessels, including the USS Saratoga, USS Independence and USS Constellation.

At the height of its ship production, the Brooklyn Navy Yard contained all the materials and machinery necessary to construct and repair naval vessels. Work done on the vessels included electrical, insulation and pipefitting. Prior to the 1970s, shipyards used asbestos in the construction and repair of naval vessels due to its fire resistant properties. During construction and maintenance of ships, insulators, electricians, plumbers, welders and pipefitters may have been exposed to asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe insulation, gaskets and cement. Those who also worked near or in the vicinity of those who repaired and maintained asbestos-containing materials were also at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Buffalo Forge

In 1878, the Buffalo Forge Company was founded by Charles Hammelmann and William Wendt. Initially, the company focused on the production of blacksmith forges. The forge, manufactured by Buffalo Forge was an innovative design that used a mechanically-driven blower in order to deliver air into the forge, instead of the traditional blacksmith’s bellows. Over the following decades, Buffalo Forge developed several innovative products in the field of air handling, including steam coil heating and air conditioning. The company also expanded its product line to include industrial manufacturing equipment and power tools. During the early 1900s, Buffalo Forge acquired the George L. Squier Manufacturing Company and the Buffalo Steam Pump Company (Buffalo Pumps). These two subsidiaries greatly expanded Buffalo Forge’s manufacturing capacity. Buffalo Forge operated as an independent company until 1993, when it was acquired by the Howden Group. The Buffalo Forge plant, which was located on Broadway in Buffalo, New York, closed in 1994.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at the Buffalo Forge Company in Buffalo, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at Buffalo Forge, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo Police Headquarters

The current Buffalo Police Headquarters building was erected in 1937, and it serves as police headquarters for the city of Buffalo, New York. The police headquarters building is located at the corner of Franklin and Church Streets, and it includes office spaces, filing rooms, jail cells, firing range and garage. This building replaced the former police headquarters building, which was located at the corner of Franklin and Seneca Streets.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used during construction and maintenance procedures at Buffalo Police Headquarters. Asbestos containing fireproofing was especially prevalent throughout the Buffalo Police Headquarters. This material was applied to the structural steel of buildings in order to protect it from potential fire damage. The application process typically produced large clouds of asbestos dust. Laborers and tradesmen hired to apply, remove or work in the vicinity of fireproofing materials may have been exposed to asbestos dust. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Buffalo Police Headquarters has recently undergone construction and renovation projects. The majority of the renovations have been centered on the removal of hazardous asbestos materials from several areas of the building. More specifically, sprayed-on asbestos fireproofing was still present in the basement at the department’s firing range and the cold case filing room. Several sections of the fireproofing became loose and fell to the floor of the firing range. Upon an inspection of the building, additional asbestos materials were found, including asbestos-containing popcorn ceilings, block insulation, insulating cement and pipe covering.

In 2011, the Buffalo News reported that a former Buffalo Police officer suffering from mesothelioma will receive a settlement of $1.7 million from the City for his injuries caused by exposure to asbestos while working as a police officer. The 44-year-old police officer, who joined the police force in 1994, was diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2008 and has undergone a number of surgeries, according to the Buffalo News. The mesothelioma attorneys who represented the police officer argued that there was evidence supporting the former officer’s claims that he developed mesothelioma after inhaling asbestos fibers while he worked in at least one city-owned building. “He had been stationed in the former precinct station house on Bailey Avenue, the old Theater Station that was located in a former Greyhound Bus station on Main Street and in Police Headquarters on Franklin Street. All three facilities contained asbestos, according to city officials.” (Cited source: The Buffalo News – May 4, 2011)

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one served as a Buffalo Police officer and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Buffalo State Hospital

The Buffalo State Hospital, also known as the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane, was established in 1880 for the purpose of treating the mentally ill. The hospital was one of the first mental institutions in New York State to therapeutically treat mental illness. The buildings were designed by noted architect Henry Hobson Richardson, and the landscaping was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead. Located on Forest Avenue in Buffalo, New York, Buffalo State Hospital sits on ninety-one acres of land and originally consisted of ten ward buildings and a central administration building. During the 1960s, three of the ward buildings were demolished and additional facilities were constructed, including the Strozzi Building and the Butler Rehabilitation Center. In 1974, the hospital was renamed the Buffalo Psychiatric Center, and the remaining original seven ward buildings closed. The administration building was occupied until 1994, when the administrative offices were moved to the Strozzi Building. In 1973, Buffalo State Hospital was added to the state and national Registers of Historic Places, and in 1986, it was registered as a National Historic Landmark.

Asbestos-containing materials were used during construction and maintenance at Buffalo State Hospital. Workers applied and removed asbestos-containing pipe covering, block insulation, fireproof insulation, thinset and insulating cement at the hospital. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Fireproof insulation was applied to structural steel at Buffalo State Hospital in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Asbestos was incorporated into fireproofing because of its resistance to fire. When fireproof insulation was applied or disturbed, asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled.

Steam and water pipes at Buffalo State Hospital were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement in order to maintain a constant temperature within plumbing systems. Block insulation was applied to steam boilers, which allowed the boilers to operate more efficiently. Ceramic and marble tiles were held in place with asbestos-containing thinset mortar. Applying and removing asbestos-containing materials emitted asbestos dust into the air.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Buffalo State Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Buffalo State Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Burgard High School

Burgard High School was established in 1910 as the Elm Vocational School, which primarily held printing press classes. Burgard moved to its current location on Kensington Avenue in 1930, when it was renamed in honor of Henry

  1. Burgard, who donated five acres of land to construct the school. Currently, Burgard High School enrolls about 500 students per year, and it offers a full Regents curriculum. Burgard is known for its vocational education programs in areas such as printing, welding, automotive repair, computer-aided design and building management.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used during the construction and maintenance of Burgard High School. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Over the course of nearly a century, several renovations have taken place at Burgard High School. During these renovations, workers may have been exposed to asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and acoustical plaster. Asbestos-containing brake pads and brake shoes were also utilized in the classroom and during vocational instruction.

In the classroom, students and instructors at Burgard High School were taught how to remove and apply brake pads and shoes. During this process, students typically used asbestos-containing brake pads and brake shoes. After the brake drum was removed, students detached the worn brake shoe from within the drum and, subsequently used compressed air to remove brake dust and clean the brake drum. Before new brake shoes were installed, students used a bench grinder to sand the surface of the brake lining to ensure that the shoes fit properly inside the brake drums. Both of these processes released microscopic dust into both the student and instructor’s work area. Additionally, asbestos dust created from sanding and grinding brake parts has been known to linger in the air of a workspace for up to three or four days after the brakes have been removed or applied.

Students and faculty were not the only individuals exposed to asbestos at Burgard. Outside contractors and the school’s maintenance staff repaired and maintained Burgard’s boilers and plumbing systems, which were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. Hot water and steam pipes at Burgard High School were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement in order to maintain a stable temperature within the water and steam systems. Block insulation covered steam boilers. During maintenance procedures, workers removed and reapplied asbestos-containing insulation. Removing and applying asbestos insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which nearby workers inhaled.

In order to reduce noise levels in the hallways at Burgard, asbestos-containing acoustical plaster was applied to the ceilings. Acoustical plaster was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water before it was applied to the lathe of the ceiling surface. When workers mixed acoustical plaster with water, asbestos dust was emitted into the air, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you were once a laborer or maintenance employee who worked at Burgard High School in Buffalo, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Burgard High School

Burgard High School was established in 1910 as the Elm Vocational School, which primarily held printing press classes. Burgard moved to its current location on Kensington Avenue in 1930, when it was renamed in honor of Henry P. Burgard, who donated five acres of land to construct the school. Currently, Burgard High School enrolls about 500 students per year, and it offers a full Regents curriculum. Burgard is known for its vocational education programs in areas such as printing, welding, automotive repair, computer-aided design and building management.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used during the construction and maintenance of Burgard High School. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Over the course of nearly a century, several renovations have taken place at Burgard High School. During these renovations, workers may have been exposed to asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and acoustical plaster. Asbestos-containing brake pads and brake shoes were also utilized in the classroom and during vocational instruction.

In the classroom, students and instructors at Burgard High School were taught how to remove and apply brake pads and shoes. During this process, students typically used asbestos-containing brake pads and brake shoes. After the brake drum was removed, students detached the worn brake shoe from within the drum and, subsequently used compressed air to remove brake dust and clean the brake drum. Before new brake shoes were installed, students used a bench grinder to sand the surface of the brake lining to ensure that the shoes fit properly inside the brake drums. Both of these processes released microscopic dust into both the student and instructor’s work area. Additionally, asbestos dust created from sanding and grinding brake parts has been known to linger in the air of a workspace for up to three or four days after the brakes have been removed or applied.

Students and faculty were not the only individuals exposed to asbestos at Burgard. Outside contractors and the school’s maintenance staff repaired and maintained Burgard’s boilers and plumbing systems, which were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. Hot water and steam pipes at Burgard High School were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement in order to maintain a stable temperature within the water and steam systems. Block insulation covered steam boilers. During maintenance procedures, workers removed and reapplied asbestos-containing insulation. Removing and applying asbestos insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which nearby workers inhaled.

In order to reduce noise levels in the hallways at Burgard, asbestos-containing acoustical plaster was applied to the ceilings. Acoustical plaster was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water before it was applied to the lathe of the ceiling surface. When workers mixed acoustical plaster with water, asbestos dust was emitted into the air, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you were once a laborer or maintenance employee who worked at Burgard High School in Buffalo, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Canandaigua VA Medical Center

The Canandaigua Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center was established in 1933, as part of the newly created Veterans Administration. Located on Fort Hill Avenue in Canandaigua, New York, it provides inpatient and outpatient medical services to United States military veterans living in Western New York. The Canandaigua VA Medical Center is comprised of 14 buildings on 150 acres of land. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970’s, asbestos could be found as a component of insulation and building materials. During construction and maintenance projects at the VA Medical Center, asbestos-containing insulation was utilized on boilers and pipes. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement were applied to steam and water pipes throughout the VA Medical Center. Handling or cutting lengths of pipe covering emitted asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. Due to wear and tear on some of the pipes, asbestos-containing pipe covering required repair and maintenance. Worn asbestos insulation was dismantled and replaced. Removing and replacing asbestos-containing pipe covering was an extremely dusty process and created enormous dust clouds.

Three boilers located in the powerhouse building at the VA Medical Center were used to provide heat and hot water. These boilers were covered with asbestos block insulation. Similar to pipe covering, workers cut block insulation with hand saws to accommodate rounded or irregular parts of the boilers. Cutting block insulation also emitted asbestos fibers and dust into the air.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with construction projects at the Canandaigua Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Carbola Chemical Company

In 1900, the St. Lawrence Talc Company began mining operations in Lewis County, New York, close to the Village of Natural Bridge. Located on New York State Route 3, the mine was originally intended to produce silver, but when only trace amounts of it were found, production shifted to talc.

In 1916, the company was renamed the Carbola Chemical Company. In 1964, International Talc acquired Carbola, and the mine operated as a division of its new parent company. Mining operations at the site were phased out in 1970, and in 1974, ownership of the mine passed to T. Vanderbilt after Vanderbilt’s acquisition of International Talc. Located on 380 acres of land, the Carbola mine consisted of not only a 600-foot deep mine shaft, but a talc mill, laboratory, machine shops, offices and several storage buildings. During its peak production years in the early 20th Century, the mine employed around 100 workers.

Several scientific studies have correlated exposure to talc mined in this region of Northern New York with instances of asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma and lung cancer among talc miners.1   Asbestos formations occur naturally throughout talc deposits in the region. Over the past fifty years, Jefferson County has had one of the highest mortality rates for mesothelioma in the United States.2  The Carbola mine is located in Lewis County just a mile away from the Jefferson County border, and many residents of Jefferson County worked in this mine and several others in the area. A study conducted in 2002 estimated that men in Jefferson County had the sixth-highest mesothelioma mortality rate in the nation, while women were ranked second-highest. Since the early 1980s, the mesothelioma rate has increased to the point that it is now five to ten times the background rate.3  Talc mine workers, outside contractors and residents of Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence Counties are at risk of developing mesothelioma, lung cancer or other lung ailments related to talc exposure from the Carbola mine. Upon information and belief, there have been at least five mesothelioma cases associated with exposure to the Carbola talc. Employees, family members, and even residents living near or around the Carbola mine have developed and died from mesothelioma.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos insulation also covered boilers, pipes and associated equipment throughout the Carbola Chemical Company talc mine. Due to wear and tear, laborers removed and reapplied asbestos-containing materials. When workers handled asbestos containing insulation, asbestos dust and fibers were released into the air and inhaled by anyone in the vicinity. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without masks or protective gear. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Exposure to dust resulting from talc mining and milling put many miners and their families at risk for mesothelioma and lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked, lived or played near the Carbola mine and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Carrier Corporation

Carrier Corporation was founded in 1915 by Willis Carrier, the inventor of the modern air conditioner. The Carrier Corporation is a manufacturer of heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment. In 1937, Carrier Corporation relocated to the west side of Syracuse, New York from Newark, New Jersey. By the late 1940’s, Carrier outgrew its west side location, and in 1947, it moved to a new facility on Thompson Road in Dewitt, New York. In 1979, United Technologies Corporation acquired Carrier Corporation. In 2004, Carrier ceased its manufacturing operations at the Thompson Road facility, and it moved its operations to facilities in Stone Mountain, Georgia and China. Carrier Corporation’s research and development and customer support divisions remain in operation at the Thompson Road facility.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering, block insulation, packing material, insulating cement and gaskets were utilized during maintenance and repair procedures at Carrier. Workers who applied and removed asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used during manufacturing processes, and it was also used to heat buildings throughout the plant. A system of pipes delivered steam to radiators and manufacturing equipment. Asbestos-containing insulation was applied to boilers, pumps, valves and pipes. Workers who performed maintenance or repairs within the steam system removed asbestos insulation in order to gain access to the equipment. New insulation was applied when these procedures were completed. The process of removing and applying insulation to equipment in the steam system caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

Workers at Carrier utilized asbestos-containing gaskets in order to ensure a tight seal between flanges on pipes, pumps and valves. Gaskets were fabricated from large sheets of asbestos-containing material. Cutting gasket material emitted asbestos fibers into the air. During maintenance and repair procedures within pipe systems and pumps, gaskets were removed and replaced. Scraping or removing gaskets also emitted asbestos-containing dust.

Asbestos-containing packing material was used to prevent leaks from valve stems and pump shafts. Workers replaced packing material during maintenance and repairs. Old packing material was pulled from pump and valve glands using a tool called a packing puller. New packing material was cut and manipulated to fit the diameter of the stem or shaft. Removing and installing packing material caused asbestos-containing dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Carrier Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Chevrolet Buffalo

Chevrolet Buffalo, which was in operation from 1923 to 2007, was one of the oldest continuously operated manufacturing facilities in Western New York. Located at 1001 East Delavan Avenue near Bailey Avenue, it opened in 1923 as a Chevrolet assembly plant. Civilian production of the passenger automobile halted during World War II. After the war ended, Chevrolet Buffalo was refitted from an assembly plant to a manufacturing plant producing rear axles for passenger cars and trucks. In 1984, Chevrolet-Buffalo joined the Saginaw Division of G.M. After a decade as Saginaw Gear and Axle, the plant was acquired by its last operator, American Axle, and continued production under that name until the plant ceased manufacturing in 2007. The labor force at this plant was part of Local 424 of the United Auto Workers Union, as part of reorganization of General Motors.

Asbestos disease does not become visible at the moment of exposure, but rather it takes many years to develop. This means that those suffering from asbestos disease now, likely had their first exposure to asbestos as long as 15 or 20 years ago, or more. Unfortunately for the former workers at Chevrolet Buffalo, the legacy of this now closed plant may be serious or fatal asbestos disease, such as mesothelioma, lung cancer or asbestosis.

As Chevrolet Buffalo was in the business of building axles for automobiles and trucks, workers were exposed to asbestos used as a component part of the axles manufactured at this plant. Asbestos was also used to insulate sections of the plant, and it was also used in building materials that housed the equipment the plant produced. In the manufacture of rear axles, workers fit asbestos-containing brake shoes onto brake assemblies. The brake linings, pads and shoes used at the Chevrolet Buffalo facility arrived in bulk, open containers laden with residual asbestos dust from the original manufacturer. Airborne asbestos dust was generated when the brakes were unloaded and handled. Dust was especially significant when the linings were ground to size on the premises. As the brakes were typically made of between 50 to 75% chrysotile asbestos, the work was extremely hazardous.

In addition to the asbestos in the brake linings used in the assembly process, workers at Chevrolet Buffalo were exposed to asbestos used as an insulating material on high temperature piping and machinery. Those who worked in the Chevrolet Buffalo plants were constantly exposed to asbestos dust from working with and in the vicinity of men who repaired and maintained asbestos insulation on pipes, tanks, ducts, heat treat equipment and boilers. Construction, repair and maintenance work was performed by both Chevrolet-Buffalo employees and by outside contractors hired by General Motors. In addition to exterior asbestos insulation, Chevrolet had a vast network of pipes and piping systems which included a wide array of pumps and valves. In the initial assembly and maintenance of this system, asbestos-containing gaskets and rope asbestos packing were widely used. This ultimately caused the airborne release of asbestos when the materials were cut during new installation or when they were removed by scraping, grinding or wire brushing.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Chevrolet Buffalo and the other General Motors Plants located in Western New York, including the Chevrolet Foundry, Chevrolet Forge, Chevrolet Engine Plants and the Harrison Radiator Plants located in both Buffalo and Lockport, New York. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at any of these manufacturing plants and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Chicago Pneumatic

Chicago Pneumatic was founded in 1901 as a manufacturer of various tools. These tools include generators, air compressors, power tools, light towers and hydraulic equipment. Chicago Pneumatic was founded by John Duntley who originally intended to make and sell construction tools “that weren’t available yet.”

In 1901, Chicago Pneumatic patented the first single-valve pneumatic hammer and soon thereafter expanded to England, Canada and Germany. In 1912, Chicago Pneumatic created a horizontal 2-cycle semi-diesel oil engine to power CP compressors. This innovation was followed by the Simplate valve, which presented greater control with high speeds and offered greater capacity. In 1939, Chicago Pneumatic produced the first impact wrench in the world. Throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s Chicago Pneumatic continued to expand and develop new products. Chicago Pneumatic’s best sellers included tools for drilling wells and breaking into hard surface rock. Tools manufactured by Chicago Pneumatic helped to build some of the nation’s most prolific sky scrapers and other architecture projects of its time. In 1987, Chicago Pneumatic because a part of AtlasCopco., a Swedish conglomerate.

In 1948, Chicago Pneumatic opened a multimillion-dollar plant in Utica, New York at 2200 Bleecker Street, Frankfort, New York 13503.

Chicago Pneumatic used grinding, heat treating and welding to manufacture its tools. Workers in the grinding and heat treatment departments were at high risk of asbestos exposure. Additionally, during the heat treatment process and cool down method, asbestos was poured onto extremely hot pieces directly from the oven. Workers described the asbestos as being unloaded at the plant in large bags. The bags would be dumped and unloaded into large vats, causing large clouds of particles that were presumably inhaled by the workers in the vicinity.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at and produced by Chicago Pneumatic. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at a Chicago Pneumatic facility or used products manufactured by Chicago Pneumatic and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Claxton Asbestos Company

The Claxton Asbestos Company was formed in 1928 in Buffalo, New York. Claxton was involved in the sale, distribution and installation of asbestos insulation products at commercial and industrial job sites throughout Western New York. On June 28, 1959, Claxton was sold and changed its name to Claxton Asbestos Company, Inc. The new owners continued the same operations as Claxton Company. In July 1982, Claxton changed its name to Claxton Industries Inc. and subsequently dissolved in 1998.

The use of asbestos-containing materials in the construction industry was prevalent until the late 1970s. Claxton was involved in the installation of asbestos products at industrial and commercial facilities throughout Western New York. Claxton was a distributor in the Western New York area for Keene Corporation, a former manufacturer of asbestos insulation. Claxton also purchased asbestos insulation from other local insulation distributors.

Claxton performed insulation work at major job sites throughout the Buffalo area, including Bethlehem Steel Lackawanna Plant, Niagara Mohawk stations, Ashland Oil and National Aniline. In addition to distributing Keene insulation products, Claxton purchased asbestos insulation from local distributors, including IDI, Niagara Insulation, Inc., Frontier Insulation and Armstrong Industries and Supply Co. These insulation materials were applied at various job sites throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one either worked for Claxton or worked at job sites where Claxton installed asbestos insulation, you may have been exposed to asbestos.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, have worked closely with clients previously employed by Claxton Asbestos who are now facing illnesses due to asbestos exposure. Our attorneys have an abundance of knowledge regarding the installation and distribution of asbestos contaminated products by Claxton. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer as a result of working at job sites with Claxton Asbestos, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Con Edison

Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Edison) provides electric service for the majority of boroughs comprising New York City and Westchester County, as well as areas of northern New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania. The company also provides natural gas service in Manhattan, the Bronx, Staten Island and portions of Queens and Westchester counties. In addition, Con Edison owns and operates the world’s largest district steam system, providing steam service to office and residential buildings, hospitals and schools in parts of Manhattan. Founded in 1884, Con Edison is a combination of the original New York Gas Light Company and the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of New York, founded by electricity visionary Thomas Edison.

Con Edison has long owned and maintained numerous powerhouses and utility substations in New York City and its surrounding areas. Sold in 1999, the Arthur Kill Powerhouse in Staten Island and the Astoria Powerhouse in Queens were once two of Con-Edison’s largest powerhouses. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was used extensively in the utility industry as insulation for high-heat temperature equipment such as turbines, large boilers, tanks, pumps, steam pipes and valves. Asbestos could also be found in gaskets and in the block insulation that covered boilers and turbines. As a result of asbestos exposure at Con Edison powerhouses and utility stations, many workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

It was often necessary for maintenance work to be performed on aging equipment within various Con Edison plants. During this time, worn asbestos insulation that covered pipes was torn-down, and workers would assist with dismantling and replacing the asbestos insulation. This process was extremely messy and would create enormous dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos insulation and other materials placed employees at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

There are currently over 100 miles of steam mains, traps, manholes and service pipes that make up the Con Edison steam system. Aging steam pipes laid in the early 20th century remain a hidden danger underground. These pipes range in size from one to thirty inches in diameter, and deliver clean, steam energy to roughly 2,000 customers from the Battery to Harlem. Workers who once fabricated gaskets and applied asbestos insulation to the underground pipes are at risk for developing asbestos related diseases. One of the greatest concerns with this aging system is the potential for pipes to rupture causing underground explosions which could emit dangerous levels of asbestos fibers and dust into the air. In 2007, a 24-inch steam pipe that was laid in 1924 exploded in Midtown Manhattan near Grand Central Terminal, leaving one person dead and more than 30 injured. High levels of asbestos fibers were noted in the area of the explosion, and subsequently, over 200 individuals were evacuated from their homes and businesses as a result of the asbestos contamination.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at a Con Edison facility and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Con-Edison Powerhouses and Stations:

» Astoria Powerhouse (sold in 1999) – Astoria

» Arthur Kill Powerhouse (sold in 1999) – Staten Island

»   Con-Ed 69th  & 3rd  Avenue Station – Manhattan

»   Con-Ed 14th  Street Powerhouse (East River Generating Station) – Manhattan

»   Con-Ed 74th  Street Powerhouse – Manhattan

» Con-Ed A Street Powerhouse – Manhattan

»   Con-Ed Steam Plant (former IRT powerhouse) 58th  Street and 11th  Avenue

– Manhattan

»   Con-Ed East 72nd  Street Powerhouse – Manhattan

» Con-Ed East River Generating Station – Manhattan

» Con-Ed Hellgate Station – Bronx

»   Con-Ed 39th  Street Powerhouse – Manhattan

» Kent Avenue Powerhouse – Brooklyn

» Con-Ed West 65th Street Powerhouse – Manhattan

»   Con-Ed 59th  Street Powerhouse – Astoria

» Ravenswood Powerhouse – Queens

» Indian Point Powerhouse Unit II – Buchanan, NY

» Hunts Point Powerhouse – Bronx

» Sherman Creek Powerhouse – Manhattan

» Van Nest Powerhouse – Bronx

» Waterside Powerhouse -Manhattan

Cornell University

Founded in 1865 by two New York State Senators, Cornell University is one of New York State’s most renowned universities. During the nineteenth century, the university regularly admitted both women and African Americans, and it was well known for the diversity of its student body. Today, the university is recognized around the world as a center of academic excellence. Cornell University Cornell’s main campus, located on East Hill in Ithaca, New York, was originally built on 209.5 acres of land. The campus currently spans over 745 acres and is comprised of 260 buildings including, laboratories, athletic facilities, auditoriums, museums and lecture halls. The construction of most of these buildings began during the late 1960s and early 1970s. In recent years, workers who assisted in the construction at the Cornell campus have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

The construction of many of Cornell’s contemporary structures required the use of asbestos containing fireproofing, joint compound and pipe covering. Workers who handled asbestos containing materials and those who worked in the vicinity were likely exposed to harmful asbestos dust and fibers. As a result, they have an elevated risk of developing a debilitating respiratory disease, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

In the process of representing workers and their families, our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the types and varieties of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Cornell University and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Crane Company

Crane Co. is a publicly traded company founded in 1855 and headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut. Crane was one of the leading manufacturers of bathroom fixtures in the United States until it sold off that division in 1990. Today Crane is a holding company operating four business segments, each of which designs and manufactures highly engineered industrial products: Aerospace & Electronics, Engineered Materials, Payment and Merchandising Technology, and Fluid Handling. Crane’s fluid handling segment distributes industrial fluid control products and systems globally, including valves, pumps, lined pipe and instrumentation. These fluid handling products are used in industries with environments that are highly corrosive or erosive, and with extreme temperature and pressure requirements.

Users of Crane Co.’s valve systems included the US Navy and General Motors. During and after World War II, Crane Co. sold the US. Navy valves for use in high-pressure, high-temperature steam pipe systems on ships. Crane packaged the valves with gaskets consisting of an asbestos disc sealed by a layer of rubber, and braided asbestos-based stem packing. Eventually, those materials need to be replaced and Crane marketed an asbestos-based sheet material “Cranite” to be used to pro-

duce replacement gaskets and packing. Crane knew that other replacement materials were available but continued to manufacture asbestos-based Cranite. Crane’s knowledge of the harmful effects of the inhalation of asbestos dust dated back to the 1930s. Nonetheless, Crane continued to incorporate asbestos components into its products without warning thworkers, and never tested their products for hazards. Even as late as 1983, Crane Co. maintains their belief that the encapsulated asbestos products were safe, despite the request of their customers, including government agencies, to affix caution labels on all of their asbestos-containing products.

The process of cleaning out these valves and replacing worn our asbestos gaskets and packing materials often caused the asbestos within the valves to become loose and disturbed. The valves often had to be grinded down. Once a worker began to grind down the valves fine asbestos particulate was known to permeate the air, exposing workers to carcinogenic dust. Crane Co. also used an array of prefabricated asbestos coverings and wraps for various piping and other physical structures that needed insulation around the plant. This insulation also had to be regularly changed and maintained throughout any plant or facility.

 

Crane Co. – Boilers and Radiators

Crane also manufactured boilers and radiators. The most extensive form of asbestos exposure took place during the removal or tear-out of old residential boil- ers. Up until the early 1960s, a round series residen- tial boiler was often covered in inch thick asbestos insulation, otherwise known as asbestos shorts. Hot water or steam pipes associated with these boilers were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Depending on the manufacturer, interior sections of a round boiler incorporated asbestos insulation in order to insulate combustion chambers. Individuals who installed, repaired and maintained round boilers were exposed to asbestos, which can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer. Prior to the 1970s, interior sections of square sectional boilers contained aircell asbestos insu-

lation between the jacket and sectional heating sections. Depending on the manufacturer, square sectional boilers also contained asbestos gaskets; asbestos rope and/or packing; and asbestos cement. Plumbers and boilermakers installed asbestos components during the installation of sectional boilers.

Asbestos Facts

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral with long, thin fibrous crystals derived from metamorphic rocks. Asbestos fibers are soft and pliable to the touch and capable of withstanding very high temperatures. They are also very strong and can make products more durable. There is a latency period ranging from 15 to 50 years between initial exposure to asbestos and the development of this deadly disease. For many who worked in shipyards, power plants,

 

and other industries that used asbestos in their manufacturing process in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, symptoms of this disease are just beginning to surface now.

 

Asbestos Litigation Against Crane Co.

Gerald Suttner, who worked as a pipefitter amid Crane valves at General Motors’ Tonawanda Engine Plant, filed a similar New York Supreme Court lawsuit with his wife Joann against Crane and 37 others, after he was also diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma. Suttner’s wife added a wrongful death claim after he died the next year. A jury ultimately found Crane 4 percent liable and awarded

$3 million in damages, and the Supreme Court refused to set the verdict aside. The Appellate Division affirmed. Crane appealed the court’s ruling, but the New York Court of

Appeals affirmed the lower court’s rulings. The Judge in the case, Honorable Sheila AbdusSalaam, wrote, “Likewise, Crane’s promotion of asbestos-continuing packing and gaskets as suitable for use in high-temperature, high-pressure system showed that Crane endorsed, as a matter of practical necessity, the joint use of its product and asbestos-laden products that it had promoted.”

As of 2016, Crane had set aside $696 million to cover anticipated asbestos liability claims through 2059.

Inhaling dust and airborne particles from exposure to asbestos put workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Laborers who worked with Crane Co.’s valves and gaskets, boilers and radiators were not aware of the hazards of exposure to asbestos when they performed their job duties without wearing protective gear. Even those who might not have been in direct contact with asbestos insulation but worked in the vicinity still remain at risk. If you or a loved one worked with a Crane Co. product and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Crouse-Hinds

Crouse-Hinds was founded in 1894 by Huntington B. Crouse and Jesse L. Hinds. Located in Syracuse, New York, it is a manufacturer of electrical conduit fittings, enclosures and explosion-proof products. In 1911, Crouse-Hinds constructed its plant at the corner of Seventh North and Wolf Streets. The plant eventually grew to include ten buildings on fifty-four acres of land. Cooper Industries acquired Crouse-Hinds in 1981, and it renamed its new subsidiary Cooper Crouse-Hinds. Crouse Hinds is one of the top-selling manufacturers of electrical construction materials in the world.

 

Dozens of asbestos-containing materials, such as floor tile, mastic, duct insulation, gaskets, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were utilized at the Crouse-Hinds plant. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into explosion-proof sealing compounds and packing material, manufactured by Crouse-Hinds. In hazardous industrial environments, specially designed explosion-proof electrical conduit fittings, control boxes and light fixtures were used in order to prevent explosions and fires. Asbestos-containing packing material and sealing compound were placed inside explosion-proof conduit fittings in order to restrict the passage of gases, vapors or flames. Installing packing material and mixing sealing compound emitted asbestos fibers, which workers inhaled.

Workers at Crouse-Hinds regularly came into contact with asbestos-containing insulation materials, which surrounded the equipment they worked with. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, pumps and boilers at the Crouse-Hinds Syracuse plant. Due to wear and tear, it was common for asbestos-containing materials to be removed and reapplied. When worn insulation was removed, new asbestos containing insulation was applied so that pipes, boilers and other equipment could contain steam and other corrosive or high heat materials. During the application and removal processes, large amounts of asbestos dust and fibers were emitted into the air. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing materials also covered equipment that was not associated with the manufacturing processes. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts were wrapped in asbestos-containing insulation. When HVAC duct insulation was damaged or disturbed, asbestos dust and fibers were emitted. Vibrations from within the HVAC system also caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. Asbestos-containing gaskets were used to ensure a tight seal between pipe flanges in the compressed air and steam systems at Crouse-Hinds. Even the floors in non-manufacturing areas at Crouse Hinds were covered with vinyl asbestos floor tiles and asbestos-containing mastic. Asbestos was incorporated into floor tiles and mastic because of its inherent strength. Cutting vinyl asbestos tiles also caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. When floor tiles and mastic were removed during repairs or renovations, asbestos dust and fibers were released into the air, which anyone working in the nearby vicinity inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Crouse-Hinds and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Cummins Jamestown Engine Plant

In 1974, Cummins, Inc. established the Jamestown Engine Plant in Jamestown, New York. The Cummins plant manufactures diesel engines for heavy-duty trucks, tractors and other vehicles. The plant is over a million square feet, and it employs over 1,400 people. The Jamestown Engine Plant is one of the largest manufacturers of heavy-duty diesel engines in the world, with over 100,000 engines produced per year. The plant is also the largest private employer in Chautauqua County.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the manufacturing process and during maintenance procedures at the Cummins Inc. Jamestown Engine Plant in Jamestown, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Cummins Inc. Jamestown Engine Plant in Jamestown, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

C.E. Thurston & Sons, Inc.

C.E. Thurston & Sons Inc. was founded in 1919 as a contracting services provider. The company began as a small distribution business for mechanical packing manufacturers, and expanded into insulation, marine and cold storage

contracting. In 1949, the company was incorporated as C.E. Thurston & Sons, Inc., headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia.

The company provided materials and products to industrial, commercial and marine businesses. The work done by C.E. Thurston & Sons included the sale, installation, maintenance and removal of asbestos containing insulation. Though C.E. Thurston & Sons never manufactured asbestos-containing insulation itself, it contracted with several other companies to buy, sell, repair, maintain and remove asbestos-containing insulation. C.E. Thurston & Sons failed to warn workers of the dangers of handling asbestos-containing products.

As a contracting company, C.E. Thurston & Sons installed, repaired, maintained and removed asbestos-containing insulation. The installation, maintenance and removal of asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos-containing particulate to be disturbed. Often, installation and removal of asbestos-containing insulation occurred in small spaces with little ventilation. Employees who worked closely with this insulation, or in close proximity to this insulation were at high risk of asbestos exposure.

Occupations at risk of C.E. Thurston & Sons Asbestos Exposure:

» C.E. Thurston & Sons workers

» Construction workers

»   Plant workers

» Mechanical workers

 

»   Shipyard workers

» Navy veterans

In 1985, C.E. Thurston & Sons became one of 34 companies to sign the Wellington Agreement. This Agreement aided companies in handling the large number of asbestos claims they were faced with. C.E. Thurston & Sons entered a second agreement following the Wellington Agreement to try and handle the influx of asbestos lawsuits, but ultimately filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2003. Today, C.E. Thurston & Sons continues to operate, and now works on asbestos abatement and lead abatement, as well as providing contracting services.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by C.E. Thurston & Sons. It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed by C.E. Thurston & Sons, or otherwise exposed to asbestos-containing products as a result of work done by C.E. Thurston & Sons, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Cambridge Filter

During World War II, the Arthur D. Little Company invented a filter that removed radioactive particles from the air. This filter, called the absolute filter, was manufactured under a classified government contract. After the absolute filter was declassified in 1950, Arthur D. Little Company and Carrier Corporation formed a joint venture called the Cambridge Filter Corporation in order to manufacture and sell the filter. In 1954, Cambridge Filter became an independent corporation. Originally located on Erie Boulevard in Syracuse, New York, Cambridge manufactured filters for many military and industrial purposes, including radiation protection, gas masks and automotive filters. In 1962, Cambridge Filter moved its manufacturing facility to a 178,000 square foot building on eleven acres of land in Liverpool, New York. The Liverpool facility employed nearly 300 workers. The Farr Company acquired Cambridge Filter in 1991 and moved the Cambridge production line to Mississippi. The Liverpool facility closed and has since been renovated into the Cambridge Business Center. Currently, the Cambridge Business Center has three distribution warehouse spaces on the former Cambridge Filter factory floor.

Prior to the late 1970’s, asbestos was incorporated into absolute filters manufactured by Cambridge Filter. Asbestos-containing paper was a vital component of these filters. The asbestos paper contained between five and ten percent crocidolite asbestos, which is a form of asbestos mined in either South Africa or Bolivia. Crocidolite (also known as blue asbestos) is considered to be one of the most hazardous types of asbestos. During the manufacturing process of absolute filters, asbestos paper was cut, folded, sewn and trimmed. These processes filled the air with asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled. Inhaling dust and particles from the manufacture of absolute filters placed workers at risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and carried on their work without masks or protective gear. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing

 

products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one worked at Cambridge Filter Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

 

Carbide Graphite

In recent years, former employees of Carbide Graphite Group, Inc., have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Laborers who were employed at its Packard Road plant located in Niagara Falls, New York, were routinely exposed to asbestos-containing materials. The Carbide Graphite Group, Inc., manufactured graphite electrode products, needle coke and calcium carbide. Graphite electrodes conduct electricity and were used in electric arc furnaces. Needle coke is the raw material used to produce graphite electrodes. Calcium carbide products are used to make acetylene, specialty chemicals and fuel for metal cutting, as well as for the desulfurization of iron and steel. Insulating cement, which contained asbestos, was used to insulate hundreds of high heat temperature furnaces. The furnaces were part of the process for producing electrodes.

Carbide Graphite workers were constantly exposed to asbestos dust from working with and in the vicinity of those who repaired and maintained the furnaces at the plant. In addition these workers were also exposed to asbestos-containing pipe covering that insulated steam lines throughout the plant.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Carbide Graphite. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Carbide Graphite and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Carborundum

 

In recent years, former employees of Carborundum have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbes- tos-related                              diseases. Laborers employed  at both the Buffalo Avenue and Walmore Road plants were at high risk for exposure to asbestos-contain-

ing materials. Carborundum, located in Niagara Falls, New York, manufactured general purpose grinding wheels that were used to grind steel, metal alloys and other materials. Carborundum became very well known for its diamond wheel product, which was used to grind materials that were harder than steel. Raw asbestos was used in diamond molding compounds. Laborers who handled raw asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at a high risk for injurious exposure, and at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Carborundum had over 60,000 different product lines, including 45 grinding wheel products with hundreds of variations. Carborundum’s diamond wheel products were so popular that they had their own division called the Super Abrasives Division. The diamond wheels were used for industrial applications, such as in machine shops and in tool and die shops. Bakelite, an asbestos-containing plastic molding compound, was incorporated into the center of the diamond grinding wheels. Raw asbestos was incorporated into Bakelite in order to add strength and durability. Carborundum workers have indicated that the buildings where molds were produced commonly filled with airborne dust from morning to night.

Asbestos-containing materials were also incorporated in other equipment at both Carborundum’s Buffalo Avenue and Walmore Road plants. Building 89, at the Buffalo Avenue plant, contained machinery needed for the manufacture of grinding wheels. Repairs on machinery were made on a daily basis, and from 1900 to the late 1970s asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the machinery. Millwrights and individuals who worked on or in the vicinity where machinery was being repaired or maintained are also at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma. Asbestos-containing gaskets, valves, packing, flanges, pumps, and machine brakes were utilized in this equipment.

During the removal and application processes of asbestos-containing materials, large amounts of dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where repair work was conducted. Workers describe the conditions in these buildings as being similar to a “London Fog” or snowstorm. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed employees at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

 

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Carborundum and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Chase Tower

Construction of the Lincoln First Bank Tower (Lincoln Tower) was completed in 1973. The twenty seven story building is one of Rochester, New York’s tallest skyscrapers, and it is located on the corner of Main and Huron Streets in Rochester, New York. In 1996, Lincoln Tower was renamed Chase Tower, and it currently serves as JP Morgan Chase’s upstate New York headquarters.

Workers who assisted in the construction of the Lincoln Tower have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Even though the dangers of asbestos were well-known and documented in the medical and scientific communities by the 1930’s, asbestos-containing products were still used in construction materials until the late 1970’s. Workers who assisted in the construction of the Lincoln Tower were exposed to high heat temperature materials, including asbestos-containing pipe

covering and spray applied fireproofing.

Asbestos-containing fireproofing materials covered nearly every structural beam throughout the Lincoln Tower. Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material came packaged in bags, which was then dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto the tower’s steel beams. During the application process, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air where the material was being applied. Electricians, iron workers, plumbers, pipefitters and plasterers who also worked in the vicinity where the fireproof material was applied, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust.

Asbestos-containing pipe insulation was also applied on steam and water lines that ran throughout the tower’s basement. Workers who cut, sawed and applied asbestos pipe insulation were likely exposed to airborne asbestos dust and fibers.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of Lincoln Tower were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. In the process of representing workers and their families, our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the types and varieties of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the Lincoln Tower and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Chicago Molded Products Corp.

CHICAGO MOLDED PRODUCTS CORP. was founded in 1919, and was located in Chicago, Illinois.

Chicago Molded Products Corp. was a Manufacturing plant that made different types of plastic molded products for various industries.

During the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, some of the molding compounds that Chicago Molded Products Corp. used to make their plastic molded products contained asbestos.

The companies that manufactured and supplied asbestos containing molding compounds to Chicago Molded Products Corp., knew about the health hazards of asbestos but they did not warn Chicago Molded products Corp. or its employees of these health hazards.

Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Molders, finishers and other laborers at Chicago Molded Products Corp. were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process not knowing it could harm them.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos containing plastic molding compounds but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a family member ever worked at Chicago Molded Products Corp. at any time during either the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1970’s and have contracted mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact the attorneys at Lipsitz & Ponterio, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos related injuries.

 

Clarkson University

Clarkson University, located in Potsdam, New York, was founded in 1896 in memoriam of Thomas S. Clarkson, a local entrepreneur. The University was funded by Clarkson’s three sisters and named the Thomas S. Clarkson Memorial School of Technology. The University was officially named Clarkson University on February 24, 1984. Clarkson University consists of two distinct campuses, which include the Downtown campus and the Hill campus. The majority of the campus was initially located downtown and slowly expanded to the southwestern edge of the village, which became known as the Hill campus. Almost all academics and housing have moved to the Hill campus. Clarkson is currently a nationally ranked research university with an enrollment of around 3,500 students. The University is comprised of 46 buildings spread out between the two campuses.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials utilized in the construction and maintenance of buildings at Clarkson University, including fireproofing, pipe covering, floor tiles and joint compound (mud). Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

 

The fireproof insulation applied at Clarkson University was a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. Workers poured bags of fireproof insulation into a machine, where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel with a hose. Clouds of asbestos were produced during the fireproofing application process. In order to gain access to the structural steel for other applications, tradesmen, such as electricians and plumbers scraped away fireproof insulation after it was applied. When workers disturbed the fireproof insulation, asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing joint compound was utilized in the construction process of Clarkson University’s buildings. Joint compound or “mud” was used on seams and joints over drywall tape. During preparation, the acts of pouring and mixing the powder with water released asbestos fibers into the air. After the joint compound dried, it was then sanded down to a smooth surface in order to prepare it for primer and paint. The process of mixing and sanding joint compound released asbestos dust into the air putting not only drywall finishers at risk for exposure, but others who worked around them.

Steam was used for heating the buildings at Clarkson University, and it was delivered through a system of pipes. Valves, pumps and pipe elbows within the steam system were covered with asbestos containing insulation and insulating cement. Asbestos was used in pipe covering and cement because of its strength and ability to withstand high temperatures. During maintenance procedures on the steam system, workers removed asbestos pipe covering and insulating cement in order to access equipment. When the insulation and cement was removed and then reapplied, asbestos dust fibers became airborne and put workers at risk.

Asbestos vinyl floor tiles were used throughout several Clarkson buildings. During shipment, some tiles were cracked or broken, which produced asbestos dust that filled the box. When a worker opened the box to remove the tiles, asbestos dust became airborne. Cutting asbestos vinyl tiles also emitted asbestos fibers into the air, which workers inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at Clarkson University were employed by various contractors throughout New York State. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Clarkson University and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Colonel Francis G. Ward Pumping Station

Since 1915, The Colonel Francis G. Ward Pumping Station has pumped Buffalo, New York’s, drinking water from Lake Erie. When constructed, it was originally the largest pumping station in the United States, and, today, it remains one of the largest and most well-equipped water

 

treatment and pumping stations in the world. Originally, five gigantic steam-driven pumping engines pulled water from the Roundhouse Intake, which is located over a mile offshore at the mouth of the Niagara River. Each engine weighed over one thousand tons and stood over six stories tall. At the Colonel Francis G. Ward Pumping Station, large boilers produced steam to turn the pumping engines and heat the building. In the late 1930s, the pumps were replaced by smaller, more powerful electric pumps. Until 1975, the steam pumps were maintained for service and used as a backup. Prior to the mid to late 1970s, the boilers and associated steam and water pipes were covered with asbestos-containing insulation and pipe covering. Asbestos exposure can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

When asbestos-containing pipe covering was handled or disturbed, it released asbestos fibers into the air and into the breathing zone of workers. Due to wear and tear, it was common for asbestos-containing materials to be removed and reapplied. Once worn pipe covering was removed, reapplication of asbestos insulation was necessary so that the pipes could effectively contain steam. When asbestos-containing insulation was applied, it was cut with a band saw and the cement, used on pipe elbows, was mixed with water. Both processes emitted large amounts of asbestos-containing dust. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing block insulation was used to insulate the boilers. Similar to pipe covering, handling and cutting asbestos block insulation caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. Once airborne, asbestos dust can spread over a large area and remain suspended for quite some time. Inhaling these fibers put the employees of Colonel Francis G. Ward Pumping Station at great risk of developing mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Colonel Francis G. Ward Pumping Station and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

 

Consolidated Machine Tool

The Consolidated Machine Tool Corporation was formed in 1922 through the merger of five companies: Betts Machine Company, Colburn Machine Tool Company, Hilles & Jones Company, Modern Tool Company and Newton Machine Tool Company. The Consolidated Machine Tool manufacturing facility was located on Blossom Road in Rochester, New York, and it produced tools and machinery used in plastic and metal manufacturing. In 1951, Consolidated Machine Tool was acquired by the Farrel-Birmingham Company. The Rochester factory operated as a division of Farrel until 1983, when the product line was sold to the Conlon Corporation.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at Consolidated Machine Tool. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health

 

problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed by Consolidated Machine Tool Corporation, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Corning Glass Works

Founded in 1868 in Corning, New York, Corning Glass Works is a major manufacturer of specialty glass products. Corning Glass operates several manufacturing plants along the Chemung River in the city of Corning, and in towns nearby, such as Horseheads, Big Flats and Painted Post. Originally, Corning manufactured globes and lenses for railroad signal lamps; glass tubing for thermometers; and, other medical applications. In 1908, Corning developed Nonex glass, which was resistant to shattering due to fluctuations in temperature. Corning developed Pyrex in 1915, in response to a decrease in sales of their durable Nonex product. Pyrex was just as durable, and in addition, it was safe to use as cookware because it did not contain lead. Corning manufactured kitchenware under Pyrex, Corningware, and Corelle names until 1998, when it sold its consumer products division to Borden Chemical.

Corning Glass Works has made several important contributions to science and industry. In 1948, the Corning plant manufactured a 200-inch mirror for the Hale Telescope, one of the largest telescopes of its kind. Researchers from Corning developed the first functional fiber optic cable in 1970, which revolutionized global telecommunication systems by dramatically increasing the amount of information transmitted through a single cable. Corning Glass Works also manufactured the windows for every manned American space vehicle ever launched. Corning is also the world’s leading manufacturer of glass for liquid crystal displays in computer monitors, flat screen televisions and mobile phones.

Asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials utilized in the construction and maintenance of buildings at Corning Glass, including insulating cement, block insulation and gaskets. Employees of Corning Glass Works also wore asbestos-containing protective clothing. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

During the manufacturing process, steam was utilized at Corning Glass Works. Boilers that produced steam for Corning Glass products were covered in asbestos-containing block insulation. When workers handled or cut block insulation, asbestos fibers became airborne. Asbestos-containing insulating cement was also used to cover pipe elbows and valves. Insulating cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and prior to application it was mixed with water to form a paste. When insulating cement was poured and mixed, asbestos-containing dust and fibers were emitted. Asbestos-containing gaskets were utilized in the steam

 

system at Corning Glass Works to ensure a tight seal between pipe flanges. Workers scraped off and replaced gaskets during maintenance and repair procedures. The gasket removal process also caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne.

Workers at Corning Glass frequently wore asbestos-containing protective clothing, such as gloves, aprons, jackets and sleeves, because of their close proximity to molten glass. Even if workers moved while wearing asbestos protective equipment, asbestos fibers were released into their breathing area. Asbestos curtains were placed around kilns and furnaces in order to shield unprotected workers from high temperatures. When the curtains were moved or disturbed, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Corning Glass Works and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Crescent Tool Company

In 1907, the Crescent Tool Company was founded in Jamestown, New York, by Swedish immigrant Karl Peterson. Located on Harrison Street in Jamestown, the Crescent manufacturing facility consisted of nine interconnected buildings on over two acres of land. At its production height during World War II, it employed nearly 700 people. Crescent manufactured various hand tools in Jamestown, including the world-famous Crescent Adjustable Wrench. In 1960, the company became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Crescent Niagara Corporation, and in 1968, it was acquired by Cooper Industries. Most production lines moved to North Carolina in 1977, and in 1984 the plant closed.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the manufacturing process and during maintenance procedures at the Crescent Tool Company in Jamestown, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Crescent Tool Company in Jamestown, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Crucible Steel

Crucible Industries is located on the west side of Onondaga Lake, roughly two miles from Syracuse, New York. Former employees of Crucible Industries (formerly Crucible Steel) have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Workers in the steel industry were at high risk for exposure to asbestos. Asbestos was utilized throughout Syracuse, New York’s Crucible Steel facility and it could also be found in workers’ protective clothing. Those who handled asbestos materials or were in the vicinity of others who did were at a high risk for injurious exposure, and at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Crucible Steel was covered with asbestos-containing materials. Refractory materials, such as asbestos block insulation were used in the annealing, blast furnaces, open hearth furnaces, heating furnaces, boilers and coke ovens. A refractory material is a non-metallic material that is capable of resisting high temperatures. Asbestos was an ideal component for refractory materials used as insulation surrounding high heat surfaces. Asbestos pipe covering also lined the outside of steam pipes throughout the Onondaga County job site.

During the application and removal of the asbestos refractory and insulation products, clouds of dust visible to the naked eye were created. The airborne dust created by the application of these asbestos products traveled long distances. Not only workers who applied these products are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma, but those who also worked in the vicinity of these units are also at risk.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Crucible Steel in Syracuse, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Curtiss-Wright Corporation

Curtiss-Wright Corporation was formed in 1929 when Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Corporation merged with Wright Aeronautical Corporation. Curtiss-Wright Corporation had two Western New York factories located in Tonawanda and Cheektowaga, New York. The company was known for manufacturing airplanes, and played a significant role in the United States war effort during World War II. Many of those who worked on these aircraft also served our country and were veterans as well.

Curtiss-Wright aircrafts were built with many asbestos containing components that may have led to the development of lung cancer and mesothelioma in former Curtiss-Wright workers. The insulation that was used throughout the aircraft as well as materials used for flooring, heat shields, various electrical parts, hose lines, brakes and any pump or valve systems onboard likely contained asbestos. Workers who repaired an maintained these aircraft after they were manufactured also risked exposure to asbestos. The company knew about the dangers of asbestos and failed to warn those who worked with these aircraft. The number of aircraft they produced in the region numbered into the tens of thousands, especially through the war.

Anyone who has used or worked around at Curtiss-Wright has been put at risk of asbestos exposure and mesothelioma. This includes aerospace workers who made, maintained, repaired, and operated aircraft. This also includes aerospace employees who used the hydraulic and power fluid systems, made with asbestos.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Curtiss-Wright and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC regarding your legal rights.

D’Youville College

D’Youville College was established in 1908 by the Grey Nuns of the Sacred Heart, a Catholic religious order. It was the first college in Western New York to award bachelor’s degrees to women. Up until 1971, D’Youville admitted only women. The college currently enrolls about 3,000 students per year, and it awards bachelor’s degrees in twenty-seven areas of study. D’Youville also offers graduate-level degrees in thirteen subject areas. The campus consists of eleven buildings on five city blocks in Buffalo, New York. Located on Porter Avenue, the D’Youville College campus has undergone several expansions and renovations since its initial establishment.

Many trades, such as electricians, pipefitters, carpenters, plasterers, laborers, insulators and sheet metal workers were involved in construction and renovation projects at D’Youville College. Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building and construction materials. Asbestos-containing fireproofing materials covered structural beams throughout D’Youville’s campus buildings. Fireproofing is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material was dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto surfaces with a hose. The fireproofing application process produced clouds of asbestos-containing dust, which remained suspended in the air for days. Fireproofers who applied asbestos-containing fireproofing materials are at high risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases. Additionally, tradesmen, such as electricians or sheet metal workers, frequently disturbed fireproof insulation in order to install conduits or ventilation ducts. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Drywall finishers also utilized asbestos-containing joint compound at D’Youville College in order to fill seams between sheets of drywall. Joint compound or “mud”, was manufactured as a dry mix or ready-mix. After the mud was applied to a wall’s surface and dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface, which caused asbestos dust to become airborne.

Asbestos was also incorporated into dozens of other building materials throughout D’Youville’s campus. Boilers were covered with asbestos-containing block insulation. Pumps and valves were sealed with asbestos gaskets and covered with asbestos-containing insulating cement. Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles lined hallways and classrooms. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials released asbestos dust into the air, which workers and college employees inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at D’Youville College were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at D’Youville College and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Delco Rochester Products Division

Delco Rochester Products Division manufactured carburetors, fuel injectors, valves, tubing, locks, keys and various other parts for General Motors automobile brands.

Delco Electronics Corporation was the automotive electronics design and manufacturing subsidiary of General Motors based in Kokomo, Indiana, that manufactured Delco radios and other electric products found in GM cars. The name “Delco” came from the ”Dayton Engineering Laboratories Co.,” founded in Dayton, Ohio, by Charles Kettering and Edward A. Deeds in 1909. Kettering became vice president of General Motors Research Corporation in 1920. He held the position as head of research for GM for 27 years. Delco was responsible for several innovations in automobile electric systems, including the first reliable battery ignition system and the first practical automobile self-starter.

In 1938, General Motors constructed a facility on Lexington Avenue in Rochester, New York, and in 1939, this facility became headquarters for the new Delco Rochester Products Division. Over the next fifty years, Delco Rochester Products Division manufactured parts for various General Motors automobile models.

In 1936, Delco began producing the first dashboard-installed car radios. By the early 1970s, Delco had become a major supplier of automotive electronics equipment. Based in Kokomo, Indiana, Delco Electronics employed more than 30,000 at its peak. In early 1956, Delco produced a transistorized hybrid signal-seeking car radio, which used both vacuum tubes and transistors in its radio’s circuitry. Transistors were used to replace the radio’s audio output vacuum tubes and also the vibrator.

In 1988, General Motors merged Delco Rochester Products Division with the AC Spark Plug Division to form the AC Rochester Division; it continues to operate as part of the ACDelco Division of General Motors. Although Delco Electronics no longer exists as an operating company, GM still retains rights to the Delco name and uses it for some of its subsidiaries including the ACDelco parts division.

After a series of mergers and name changes, Delco Rochester Products Division became known as Delphi Powertrain. GM’s Delco Electronics Corporation was transferred to Delphi in late 1997 as part of a transaction in which GM spun off its defense electronics business, Hughes Electronics Corporation, which had operated Delco for the previous 11 years. In 1999, Delphi became an independent corporation with no formal relationship to General Motors.

In 2005, Delphi Corporation filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, and in 2009, General Motors reacquired the Lexington Avenue facility. This plant now operates as part of GM Component Holdings, which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Motors. Currently, the

1.78 million square foot facility has 1,008 employees, many of which are members of the UAW Local #1097.

Asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used in the maintenance and upkeep of the Delco Rochester Products Division facility. Gaskets, pipe covering, block insulation, insulating cement, transite board and refractory mortar contained asbestos. Workers who handled these materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Transite Vent Pipe

Delco Rochester Products Division utilized die-cast furnaces that melted zinc alloys that were used in various engine parts. These furnaces were rebuilt on a regular basis because the high temperatures produced in the furnaces deteriorated the refractory mortar. Workers applied asbestos-containing refractory mortar onto the firebricks that lined the furnaces. Refractory mortar was packaged as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the dry mortar released asbestos fibers into the air. Additionally, asbestos-containing transite board insulated the steel exterior of the furnace. Transite was cut to the proper dimensions in order to fit into the furnaces. Sawing and cutting transite board also emitted asbestos fibers into the air.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were used in steam pipes, pumps and other equipment. Workers at Delco Rochester Products Division fabricated gaskets from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Cutting gasket material emitted asbestos dust into the air. ScrapingAsbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to water and steam pipes throughout the Delco Rochester Products Division facility. Boilers used to heat the building and produce steam for manufacturing processes were covered in asbestos block insulation. Handling or cutting lengths of pipe covering or block insulation emitted asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. Insulating cement was also used to cover pipe elbows and valves. Asbestos-containing cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the insulating cement caused asbestos-containing dust and fibers to become airborne.

and removing gaskets also released asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former workers and retirees from Delco Rochester Products Division. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at Delco Rochester Products Division and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Diemolding Corporation

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former and retired workers who were once employed at the Diemolding Corporation in Canastota, NY. In recent years, former employees of Diemolding have developed and died of mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

 

At least two of our clients died of mesothelioma due to the dust that they inhaled while working at Diemolding. In recent years, there have been several cases of this fatal cancer among the workers at Diemolding.

Located in Canastota, NY, the Diemolding Corporation was founded in 1920 by Donald H. Dew and quickly became known as an innovator of plastic materials that were utilized in a variety of industries. Since the company’s inception, Diemolding Corporation has become a worldwide manufacturer of plastic products. Today, Diemolding concentrates its resources on the production of phenolic pistons used in the automotive industry and around the globe.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was a component of high heat temperature, raw, plastic materials. Raw plastic resin was delivered to the Diemolding facility in large 55 gallon drums. Plastic mold shop workers dumped these drums into hoppers, and the plastic resin was then hand poured into ovens that heated the materials. After the materials were heated, they were then placed into the molding machines that formed a variety of plastic parts.

Laborers who worked in the preform department along with molders, finishers and maintenance personnel were exposed to materials that contained asbestos at Diemolding Corporation. Asbestos was utilized as filler in and during the process where raw plastic materials were heated and then formed into the finished plastic product.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former and retired workers who were once employed at the Diemolding Corporation in Canastota, New York. In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Diemolding Corporation in Canastota, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Donovan Building

Built in 1962, The Donovan Building was a 146,000 square foot building constructed from the former Lehigh Valley Terminal on Main Street in downtown, Buffalo, New York. It once housed eighteen state agencies, as well as offices for elected officials. In 2005, the building was vacated and scheduled for demoli-

tion in order to prepare the site for redevelopment in conjunction with the Canalside project for Buffalo’s Inner Harbor. Since then, the Erie Canal Harbor Development Corporation has reconsidered demolition, and the Donovan Building has been renovated and turned into a multi-use office building.

 

In recent years, those who assisted in the construction of the Donovan Building have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos containing fireproofing, floor and ceiling tiles, pipe covering, boiler and tank insulation, packing materials, mastic, and window glazing were used on a massive scale to construct the facility. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

When the Donovan Building was built in 1962, most trades, including carpenters, plasterers, pipe coverers, plumbers, insulators, fire proofers and boilermakers assisted in the construction of this facility. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970’s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials. Asbestos-containing fireproofing was one of the most widely-used and most dangerous materials used during the construction of the Donovan Building.

Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material was packaged in bags, and dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and then sprayed onto the Donovan Building’s steel substructure. During the application process of fireproofing, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where the material was being applied. Even long after this material was applied, the smallest vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. In addition to fire proofers, iron workers, plumbers and electricians who worked with rebar and conduits on or in the vicinity of fireproofing material, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust.

The Donovan Building also contained numerous tanks and boilers that were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. Packing materials, transite ceiling panels, floor tiles, window glazing, mastic, and floor tiles were also used during the construction of the Donovan Building. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of the Donovan Building were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of the Donovan Building and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Dresser-Rand, Wellsville

The Dresser-Rand plant in Wellsville, New York, was constructed in 1916 by James L. Moore as the Moore Steam Turbine Company. After it was acquired by the Worthington Pump and Machinery Corporation in 1937, it became Worthington’s Steam Turbine Division. Worthington merged with Studebaker in 1967, and the company was renamed Studebaker-Worthington. During a reorganization of the Worthington corporate structure in 1970, the Wellsville plant combined with smaller operations in several other cities to form the Turbodyne Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Studebaker-Worthington. Dresser Industries acquired the Wellsville plant in 1985, and after a merger with Ingersoll-Rand in 1987, the company was

 

renamed Dresser-Rand. Located on Coats Street in Wellsville, the plant currently employs around 600 people, and it manufactures steam turbines and pumps for industrial and maritime applications. Dresser-Rand currently maintains its headquarters in Olean, New York.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material were used in the manufacturing process at the Dresser-Rand (formerly Worthington) plant in Wellsville, New York. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were also utilized during maintenance procedures at the plant. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Workers at Dresser-Rand regularly came into contact with asbestos-containing insulation materials that surrounded the equipment they worked with. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, pumps and boilers at the Wellsville plant. During maintenance procedures, workers removed the insulation in order to access the equipment associated with steam and water systems. When maintenance or repair procedures were completed, new asbestos-containing insulation was applied. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne.

Asbestos gaskets were used in turbines and pumps because of their durability and ability to withstand high temperatures. Gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. The process of cutting or removing asbestos-containing gasket materials emitted asbestos dust into the air, which workers inhaled. Asbestos-containing packing materials were also installed in equipment manufactured by Dresser-Rand. Packing materials prevented steam, hot water or dangerous chemicals from leaking. Workers who participated in the manufacturing process of Worthington or Dresser-Rand turbines or pumps, or laborers, such as electricians and steamfitters, who were responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of turbines and pumps, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Dresser-Rand (formerly Worthington) plant in Wellsville, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Dunkirk and Huntley Stations

The Dunkirk and Huntley Stations were once considered the largest steam generator plants in New York State. The Dunkirk station sits on the shore of Lake Erie, 55 miles southwest of Buffalo, in Dunkirk, New York. The Niagara Mohawk

 

Corporation once owned this 600-megawatt plant consisting of four coal-fired units, including two 100-megawatt units that have been in operation since 1950, and two 200-megawatt units that went into commission 1959 and 1960.

The Huntley Station is located in Tonawanda, New York, on the Niagara River, just north of the City of Buffalo. Originally, it was called the River Station, and in 1926 it was renamed in honor of Charles R. Huntley, the late president of the Buffalo General Electric Company. The Huntley Station was once Niagara Mohawk’s largest coal-fired steam generating plant, and it contained six units with a total nominal rating of 760 megawatts.

Niagara Mohawk’s initial focus was on vast growth with regard to hydro-electric sources for the creation of energy. Electric power for Niagara Mohawk’s power lines were generated in eighty-three hydroelectric sources and in seven steam-electric generation plants. Both the Dunkirk and Huntley Stations were significant contributors to power generation in New York State.

The Niagara Mohawk Corporation owned and maintained many powerhouses and utility substations throughout New York State. The Huntley and Dunkirk stations were once considered to be the largest steam generator plants in New York. Asbestos was used extensively at both the Huntley and Dunkirk stations as insulation for high-heat temperature equipment, including turbines, large boilers, pumps, steam lines and valves. As a result of asbestos exposure at Huntley and Dunkirk utility stations, many workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

In recent years, both the Dunkirk and Huntley power stations were classified as top polluters in New York State due to emissions from burning coal. According to a pollution report submitted by Niagara Mohawk to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1999, the two stations combined released roughly 3.6 million pounds of hydrogen chloride, 1 million pounds of sulfuric acid mist and 500,000 pounds of hydrogen fluoride in addition to mercury and other toxic metals. NRG Energy, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Northern States Power Company purchased Niagara Mohawk’s Dunkirk and Huntley stations shortly after this report was filed. Since then, it has taken corrective measures to eliminate some of the emissions spewing from these two plants.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at the Dunkirk and Huntley stations and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber

In 1923, the Dunlop Tire & Rubber Company built its first American plant on Sheridan Drive in Tonawanda, New York. The plant consists of ten manufacturing buildings on 130 acres. Dunlop remained an independent company until 1986, when Sumitomo Rubber Industries acquired it. In 1997, Goodyear Tire & Rubber obtained a seventy-five percent controlling interest in Dunlop, and it was renamed Goodyear Dunlop Tires North America. The Dunlop plant in Tonawanda has manufactured tires for a wide variety of automobiles, motorcycles

 

and aircraft. The Sheridan Drive plant is the only remaining location where motorcycle tires are manufactured in North America.

Asbestos-containing materials covered a vast majority of the pipe lines and associated equipment throughout Dunlop’s Sheridan Drive plant. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Pipes were covered with asbestos-containing insulation in order to protect the pipes from high temperatures or corrosive materials. In order to prevent leaks, pump shafts and valve stems were packed with asbestos rope packing materials and sealed with asbestos gaskets. Due to wear and tear, workers removed worn asbestos-containing materials and applied new materials. When asbestos-containing materials were removed or applied, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets ensured a tight seal on the flanges, which connected pipes to pumps, valves and other associated equipment. Asbestos was incorporated into gaskets because of its inherent strength, as well as its resistance to corrosion and high temperatures. During maintenance or repairs, gaskets were frequently replaced. Because the gaskets were sealed tightly between flanges, workers scraped the gaskets from the flange. New gaskets were cut from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. The gasket replacement process released asbestos into the air and into the breathing zone of the workers.

Additionally, steam boilers at Dunlop were insulated with asbestos block insulation. This insulation was manufactured in flat, rectangular blocks, and it was cut to fit the boilers. Gaps in between pieces of block insulation were filled with asbestos-containing insulating cement. Firebricks inside the boilers were covered with asbestos refractory material in order to protect the bricks from high temperatures. Refractory materials required frequent replacement because of the high temperatures the boilers reached. Removing and applying block insulation, insulating cement or refractory materials gives rise to high levels of asbestos-containing dust.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information on the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Dunlop Tire & Rubber and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

DuPont Imaging Systems, Rochester

The DuPont Imaging Systems plant on Driving Park Avenue in Rochester, New York manufactured photographic film and chemicals. Originally established as the Defender Photo Supply Company in 1899, the company and plant were purchased in 1945 by DuPont. In 1995, DuPont ceased all operations at this location, and in 1996, the manufacturing building was demolished. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into materials used in the maintenance and upkeep of the DuPont facility, including pipe covering and fireproof insulation. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos related disease, such as mesothelioma.

 

Contractors who performed repairs and upgrades at DuPont worked in close proximity to asbestos-containing fireproof insulation. During the initial construction of DuPont’s plant, fireproof insulation was applied to structural steel to protect it from high temperatures or fire damage. Electricians, pipefitters, sheet metal workers and other contractors routinely disturbed the insulation after it was applied in order to install pipes or electrical wires. When workers disturbed the insulation, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to pipes throughout the DuPont plant. Handling or cutting lengths of pipe covering emitted asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. Pipe covering also required frequent repair and removal because of wear and tear. Removing worn pipe covering was a dirty and dusty process. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one once worked at the DuPont Imaging Systems plant on Driving Park Avenue in Rochester, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Durez Plastics – Kenton, Ohio Plant

Durez Plastics (originally named General Plastics) was established in 1921 by Harry M. Dent in North Tonawanda, New York. Durez was a chemical and plastics factory that manufactured plastic molding compound, which it then sold to other manufacturing facilities. These facilities used the plastic molding compound supplied by Durez to make a wide variety of products that included hard plastic handles for irons and other small appliances, as well as a variety of automotive parts. Durez gradually grew to accommodate the growing demand for plastic molding compounds. At the North Tonawanda facility, the phenol plant was built in 1940, and in 1947, construction of the formaldehyde plant began. In 1955, the Kenton, Ohio plant was established in order to duplicate manufacturing efforts at the North Tonawanda plant. In the same year, Durez became part of the Hooker Electrochemical Company. During its peak production years, Durez was one of the world’s largest manufacturers of phenolic resin and molding compounds.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was commonly used as a component in plastic molding compounds, insulation, as well as a variety of additional materials. The Durez Plastics facility in Kenton, Ohio was a chemical and plastics factory that manufactured and produced plastic molding compound that contained raw asbestos fibers as a filler component. In the plastic molding process, Durez used raw asbestos to add strength and durability to its products. The plant was also heavily insulated with asbestos insulation to contain the heat from steam pipes, chemical lines, boilers and kettles. Inhaling asbestos dust and particles placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, including lung cancer and mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of an asbestos-related disease.

 

The Durez Kenton, Ohio plant consisted of numerous buildings, including a warehouse, laboratory, office and manufacturing buildings. Raw asbestos material was shipped into the plant by tractor trailer or by rail. Raw materials were loaded and stored in the warehouse. Workers were exposed to asbestos fibers when they handled bags of raw asbestos and when they cleaned up bags of asbestos fibers that tore while in transit. Workers were also exposed to asbestos when they dumped bags of raw fiber into the mixers; swept up asbestos fibers; and when they used an air hose to perform “blow-downs” in the compound department in order to clean the area and reduce the accumulation of dust. Workers were also exposed to asbestos while loading finished plastic molding compound into barrels and bags for shipment.

Former workers at the Kenton, Ohio Durez plant describe production areas throughout the plant as being covered with asbestos dust. Asbestos dust flew all over the vicinity of the buildings where it was used as a raw material, contaminating the workers in the buildings and anyone working in the outside areas. Workers at Durez regularly inhaled the dangerous asbestos dust and fibers without wearing protective gear and without knowing it could cause them harm.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed to while working at the Durez Kenton, Ohio plant. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at the Kenton, Ohio Durez plant and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

 

DeGraff Memorial Hospital

DeGraff Memorial Hospital was founded in 1914 by LeGrand S. DeGraff. Located on Tremont Street in North Tonawanda, New York, it provides inpatient and outpatient medical services to residents of communities throughout Buffalo. Since its establishment, numerous expansions

 

and renovations were completed. The hospital is currently operated by Kalieda Health, and it is a 70-bed facility.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used during the construction of DeGraff Memorial Hospital. Pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation, ceiling tiles, joint compound, refractory material and fireproof insulation were used during the construction and maintenance of the hospital. Inhaling dust and particles from applying or removing asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many trades, such as electricians, plumbers, carpenters, insulators and laborers were involved in construction and renovation projects at DeGraff Memorial Hospital. During the initial construction of DeGraff, asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was sprayed onto the structural steel in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Pipe covering and insulating cement covered steam and hot water pipes throughout the hospital. Asbestos containing refractory materials were applied to the interior of steam boilers in order to protect the boilers from disintegrating because of high temperatures. Ceiling tiles at the hospital also contained asbestos. During construction and repairs at the DeGraff Memorial Hospital, workers removed and reapplied asbestos-containing materials. Removing and applying these materials caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for DeGraff Memorial Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of DeGraff Memorial Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please regarding your legal rights.

 

Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems/General Motors Components Holding Plant

The Lockport plant has gone by several names – it is formerly known as Harrison Radiator, and then Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems, and is now known as General Motors Components Holdings plant.

Harrison Radiator was established in 1910 by Herbert Harrison in Lockport, New York. During its first years of operation, the company was located in a small building on Canal Street. In 1914, Harrison Radiator moved to a facility on Washburn Street that consisted of five buildings, which became known as the Main Plant. The buildings of the former Main Plant are now utilized as an office park known as Harrison Place.

The company was acquired by United Motors in 1916, and in 1918, General Motors purchased both United Motors and Harrison Radiator. In 1952, Harrison Radiator constructed the 350-acre, 10-building manufacturing facility on Upper Mountain Road called the West Plant. Harrison Radiator manufactured automotive radiators and air conditioners at both facilities for General Motors. During its peak production years, the company employed more

 

than 10,000 workers at its Lockport facilities. In 1987, Harrison Radiator closed its Washburn Street plant.

In 1994, General Motors formed Automotive Components Group.

In 1995, General Motors branched off all its component manufacturers into a new company named Delphi Automotive Systems, and Harrison Radiator was renamed Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems.

1997: GM and Hughes Electronics Corporation branched off of Hughes Defense electronics business and transfer Delco Electronics from Hughes to Delphi.

GM spun off Delphi in 1999, and the parts supplier went through a bankruptcy reorganization from 2005 to 2009. In 1999, Delphi Automotive Systems became a fully independent publicly held corporation, with its headquarters located at 5725 Delphi Drive, Troy, MI 48098-2815.

Harrison Radiator was reacquired by General Motors in 2009 as part of its Automotive Components Group, and its plant on Upper Mountain Road continues to manufacture automotive heating and cooling components.

General Motors in late 2017 announced it would invest $3.5 million in the Lockport plant to support production of future thermal products. That followed GM’s 2016 announcement of

$32 million in investment in the Lockport site, which includes production of components including radiators, condensers, heater core and oil coolers.

Delphi Principal Subsidiaries: Delco Electronics Corporation; Delphi Automotive Systems (Holding), Inc.; Delphi Automotive Systems LLC.

Delphi Principal Divisions: Dynamics & Propulsion; Safety, Thermal & Electrical Architecture; Electronics & Mobile Communication.

Delphi Principal Operating Units: Delphi Automotive Systems; Aftermarket Operations; Audio and Mobile MultiMedia Systems; Electrical/Electronic Systems; Energy Systems; Engine Management Systems; Intellek Sensors and Actuators; Interior and Occupant Protection Systems; Microelectronics; Ride and Handling Systems; Thermal Systems.

 

ASBESTOS AND DELPHI

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst identified Delphi Corp. as the 21st-largest corporate producer of air pollution in the United States in 2002.[1] According to the study, the manufacturer’s most toxic emissions included asbestos (542 lb/yr), chromium compounds (1,082 lb/yr), lead compounds (8,466 lb/yr), and sulfuric acid (17,600 lbs/ year), while the most massive emissions were glycol ethers (111,520 lbs/year) and hydrochloric acid (80,000 lb/yr).[2]

Asbestos is an excellent electrical insulator and is highly heat-resistant, so for many years it was used as a building material. Asbestos was widely used during the 20th century until the 1970s, when public recognition of the health hazards of asbestos dust led to its prohibition in mainstream construction and fireproofing in most countries. Despite the severity of asbes- tos-related diseases, the material has been widely used all over the world, and most buildings constructed before the 1980s are thought to contain asbestos.

 

Asbestos was incorporated into numerous materials used during the manufacturing process at the Harrison Radiator/Delphi facility. Up until the late 1970s, insulating materials, such as block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, gaskets and packing material contained asbestos. Employees and contractors who worked at Harrison Radiator/Delphi were at risk for asbestos exposure. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement lined boilers, pipes, pumps and valves associated with the steam system at Harrison Radiator/Delphi.

 

Due to wear and tear, asbestos insulation was removed and reapplied so that the equipment within the steam system could maintain a constant internal temperature. When asbestos-containing insulation was removed and reapplied, asbestos dust became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized throughout the Delphi/Harrison Radiator plant. These gaskets created a tight seal between pipe flanges, pumps and valves. Asbestos- containing packing material was wrapped around valve stems and pump shafts in order to prevent fluid leaks. Asbestos gaskets and packing material were often replaced during maintenance and repairs on pumps and valves. The replacement process emitted asbestos fibers, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Harrison Radiator/Delphi facility in Lockport, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Donner Hanna Coke

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, represents former and retired workers from Donner Hanna Coke Corporation once located at Mystic and Abby Streets in Buffalo, New York. This 88 acre facility manufactured metallurgic coke, a necessary element used to make steel. Donner Hanna Coke also manufactured coke by-products, including phenol, xylene, xylenol and orthoxylenol, benzene, toluene, ammonium sulfate, gas, coke oven gas and coal tar. High temperature equipment was used to process these materials and chemicals. For decades, asbestos was used as an insulating material that was applied to a wide variety of surfaces, including pipes, coke ovens, boilers, duct work and vessels. Workers who handled asbestos materials or were in the vicinity of others who did were at a high risk for injurious exposure, and are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

In addition to asbestos exposure, those who worked on top of or alongside coke oven batteries are at a substantially increased risk for developing lung cancer and other cancers. Coke oven emissions are composed of gases and dust harmful to your lungs and skin.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning coke oven emissions, as well as the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Donner Hanna Coke in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Dresser-Rand, Olean

In 1912, the Clark Brothers Company constructed the Dresser-Rand manufacturing facility in Olean, New York, in order to replace a factory in Belmont, New York, which burned down. Originally, the Olean factory manufactured equipment for agriculture and sawmills. Because Olean was home to one the most productive oil fields in the world during the early 20th Century, the Clark Brothers expanded and began to manufacture equipment for the oil and natural gas industries. In 1938, the Clark Brothers merged with the S.R. Dresser Manufacturing Company, becoming the DresserClark Company. In 1956, the company adopted the name Dresser Industries. After a merger in 1987 with IngersollRand, the company was renamed Dresser-Rand. Today, the Olean facility is a leading manufacturer of compressors for natural gas pipelines. Prior to the 1980s, asbestos-containing insulation and gasket materials were used during the con-

struction of compressors. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, as well as lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Gaskets are used to prevent leakage at the point where two surfaces are joined together. Asbestos was incorporated into gasket materials used by Dresser to seal pipe flanges during

 

the construction of compressors. Each gasket was cut from a sheet of gasket material using a razor knife. Holes were punched into the gasket to match the bolt holes on the flange. Cutting and punching the gasket material emitted asbestos fibers, which workers subsequently inhaled. After the compressors were assembled and tested on the manufacturing floor, each gasket was removed. Some of these gaskets were scraped or sanded off, which created clouds of asbestos-containing dust.

Asbestos-containing insulating batting was also used during the manufacturing process of compressors at Dresser. The batting was applied as a covering on compressor exhaust manifolds in order to protect the compressor from extreme high temperatures. The manifolds were irregularly shaped, and portions of the batting were cut away to facilitate a tight fit. When the batting was cut, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air. Asbestos-containing insulating cement was used to fill in cracks between pieces of batting. This cement was packaged as a dry powder and mixed with water, which created a paste-like substance. The cement was then applied to the cracks. When the dry mix was poured and mixed, large amounts of asbestos-containing dust became suspended in the air. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Dresser-Rand in Olean, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

 

Dulski Federal Building

Constructed in 1971, the Thaddeus J. Dulski Federal Office Building (The Dulski Building) was once the epicenter of the federal government’s presence in Western New York. Up until 2006, tenants of the Dulski Building included the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Federal Communications Commission, the Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Department of Commerce, The U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and several other administrative agencies. After a $60 million dollar renovation and abatement project, the building was renamed The Avant Building, and it functions as an upscale multifunction facility.

In recent years, those who assisted in the construction of the Dulski Federal Building have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos-containing fireproofing, floor tiles, ceiling panels, and insulation were used on a massive scale to construct the facility. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Laborers who assisted in the construction of The Thaddeus J. Dulski Federal Office Building (The Dulski Building) located on Huron Street in Buffalo, New York, were at high risk for exposure to asbestos. In 2009, after the completion of a $60 million dollar renovation project, The Dulski Building opened its doors as an upscale multi-use facility that includes a

 

hotel, restaurant, private offices and residential units. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into various building materials, including ceiling and floor tiles, pipe covering, fireproofing material and other building materials located throughout the 380,000 square foot Dulski building.

Asbestos-containing fireproofing materials covered nearly every structural beam in the Dulski Building. Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material came packaged in bags, which was then dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and then sprayed onto the Dulski Building’s steel substructure. Prior to asbestos abatement, the Dulski Building contained roughly 253,500 square feet of asbestos-containing fireproofing. Fire proofers who applied asbestos-containing fireproofing materials are at high risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma.

During the application process of fireproofing, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air where the material was being applied. Even long after this material was applied, the smallest of vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. In addition to fire proofers, iron workers, plumbers and electricians who worked with rebar and conduits on or in the vicinity of fireproofing material, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust.

Asbestos-containing pipe and tank insulation, transite ceiling panels, window glazing, baseboard mastic and floor tiles were also used in the construction process of the Dulski Building. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed as an iron worker, fire proofer, electrician, plumber or insulator during the construction of the Dulski Federal Building, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Dunkirk Radiator

Dunkirk Radiator was founded in 1928 by Earle C. Reed at the same time as The Utica Companies of Utica New York. While they were founded jointly and shared products, they sold to different markets.

Dunkirk Radiator manufactured radiators and boilers until the 1940’s when it shifted its efforts to help Uncle Sam. During World War II, Dunkirk Radiator was the biggest manufacturer of landmines, bomb noses, and hand grenades. It resumed manufacturing and production of boilers and heating systems when the war ended.

 

Before World War II, Dunkirk Radiator specialized in making cast-iron boilers and radiators. It began making sheet metal products in the 1950’s at a newly added facility, the former Sanitary Receiver Co. In 1992, Dunkirk Radiator purchased Ultimate Engineering (Massachusetts), and in 1998, it further expanded when it purchased Pennco, Inc. (Pennsylvania).

A merger of Dunkirk Radiator and The Utica Companies in 1999 formed the new ECR International, Inc., named for its original founder, Earle C. Reed. ECR International, Inc. manufactures air-conditioning, domestic hot water heating, and furnaces. ECR operates from its Dunkirk facility, located on Middle Road in Dunkirk, New York. It was purchased by BDR Thermea in December 2015. According to Dun & Bradstreet, ECR International has 130 employees at the Middle Road location in Dunkirk, New York.

Workers at Dunkirk Radiator were exposed to asbestos-containing materials used in the radiators and boilers made by Dunkirk, as well as from the components of the boilers, such as gaskets, valves, pumps, brakes, and packing. Up until the late 1970s, numerous resi- dential boilers and furnaces contained asbestos insulation on both interior and exterior surfaces. Asbestos served as an excellent insulation material because of its durability and fire-resistant properties. Asbestos insulation also allowed for boilers and furnaces to operate properly. Massive exposure to asbestos occurred when boilermakers, plumbers and/or HVAC personnel installed, maintained and removed residential and commercial boilers and furnaces. Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford has represented tradesmen who worked with boilers manufactured by Dunkirk Radiator.

In the process of representing these workers and their families our attorneys have gathered numerous medical and liability documents that could be instrumental in your legal representation. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease as a result of working with or around Dunkirk boilers and/or radiators, contact us today for a free and confidential case evaluation.

 

DuPont

E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (DuPont) is one of the nation’s largest chemical companies, headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware. The US chemical industry’s biggest merger closed on August 31, 2017, between DuPont and Dow Chemical Company in an all-stock transaction, making the

combined company, DowDuPont, have an estimated value of $130 Billion. It was held equally by both companies’ shareholders and maintained its two headquarters. Following the merger, DowDuPont would pursue a separation into three independent, publicly traded companies: Corteva Agriscience (agricultural business); Dow, Inc. (the materials science company); and DuPont (a specialty products company.)

Historically, DuPont has had a significant manufacturing presence in Western New York, with facilities in Niagara Falls and at the Yerkes Plant located in Tonawanda, New York. The Niagara Falls Plant is located on Buffalo Avenue, and was most recently operated by The Chemours

 

Company, which was founded in July 2015 as a spin-off from DuPont. After review of its Reactive Metal Solutions business, it was decided to stop production at the Niagara Falls site by the end of 2016.

The DuPont Yerkes plant is located on River Road in the Town of Tonawanda, and converts chemicals into solid

sheets to create the non-porous Corian solid surface, which is used in a variety of applications, including healthcare environments, nurses’ stations, corridor wall cladding, and some operating rooms and a special coating for airplanes and solar panels. Tedlar, a polyvinyl fluoride film that protects surfaces from harsh weather, UV rays, chemicals and solvents, is also made at the plant. In addition to being used for solar panels and aircraft, Tedlar is being made for building supplies currently being used to make short-term hospitals and structures globally and domestically.

As a result of occupational exposure to asbestos, former employees and contracted workers at DuPont Niagara Falls and DuPont Yerkes plants have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and have suffered from a host of asbestos-related diseases, including asbestosis. DuPont’s Western New York plants were involved in the manufacture of chemicals such as polyvinyl acetate (PVA), chlorine or chemical base products such as cellophane. The production of these materials involved the use of high temperature equipment to process the materials and chemicals. For decades, asbestos was used as an insulating material that was applied to a wide variety of surfaces including pipes, furnaces, duct work, drying towers and turbines.

For many years, both outside contractors and the direct employees of DuPont handled asbes- tos in many forms. Asbestos cement, blocks, pipe covering and insulating blankets were used extensively. Asbestos gaskets and rope packing were used throughout the plants in the installation, repair and maintenance of pumps, valves, pipe flanges, compressors and ducts. DuPont workers were constantly exposed to asbestos dust throughout the entire plant. DuPont is no stranger to environmental violations. In 2018 alone, DuPont was fined over $3 million for environmental violations, and in 2019 DuPont led the “Toxic 100 Water Polluters Index.” A lawsuit was filed against DuPont in 1999 for personal injury claims as a result of the toxic chemical leak of perflurooctanoic acid (PFOA or C-8) from its plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia; ultimately in February 2017, DuPont and Chemours Co. agreed to pay $671 million to settle the 3,535 cases of toxic poisoning. On January 22, 2021, DuPont, Chemours and Corteva announced a cost-sharing agreement worth $4 billion to settle lawsuits involving the historic use of the highly toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS used to make Teflon. A feature film, Dark Waters, documents the real-life story of the 20-year battle with DuPont.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at DuPont’s

 

plants. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at DuPont and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Durez Plastics

 

Durez Plastics Corporation in North Tonawanda, New York, will always be remembered by the community surrounding it for its role in exposing workers, and their families alike, to asbestos dust. Despite the tragedy surrounding the plant and many deaths among its workers caused by asbestos exposure, Durez was once an important employer and vital part of North Tonawanda.

The number of retired and former Durez workers diagnosed with mesothelioma continues to grow at an alarming rate. Durez was a chemical and plastics fac-

tory that manufactured plastic molding compound, which it then sold to other manufacturing facilities. These facilities used the plastic molding compound supplied by Durez to make a wide variety of products that included hard plastic handles for irons and other small appliances and a variety of automotive parts. Durez molding compounds contained raw asbestos, which was incorporated as a filler in order to add strength and durability to its compounds. The North Tonawanda Durez plant was also heavily insulated with asbestos insulation in order to contain heat from steam pipes, chemical lines, boilers, kettles and reactors.

Given the massive quantities of asbestos used at Durez every year until 1978 and the poor exposure controls in place during the majority of that time, it is unlikely that the pace of new asbestos disease cases will slow down soon. Quite often, the period between first exposure to asbestos and the symptoms of mesothelioma is longer than forty years. Men and women who first worked at Durez in the 1970s will continue to be at risk until 2016 and beyond.

Mesothelioma is often referred to as a signature disease of asbestos exposure. This is because there is no other recognized cause of mesothelioma among asbestos-exposed workers and members of their families exposed to contaminated work clothing. Occupational exposure to asbestos also causes a non-malignant condition known as asbestosis which, in severe cases, causes pulmonary disability and death.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Durez Plastics. We have represented many former and retired Durez workers in their legal claims for mesothelioma. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as

 

possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Durez Plastics and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

E.J. Eddy

In 1915, E. J. Eddy, Inc., was established by Ernest J. Eddy in Buffalo, New York, in order to distribute and install asbestos-containing insulating materials. In 1958, the Mundet Cork Company acquired E. J. Eddy, Inc. In 1960, E. J. Eddy was absorbed into its parent company and became the Buffalo branch of Mundet Cork’s Thermal Insulating Division. Crown Cork and Seal acquired Mundet Cork in 1963, and in 1964, Baldwin-Ehret-Hill (BEH) acquired Mundet’s Thermal Insulating Division. BEH was acquired by Keene Corporation in 1968 and became the Keene Building Products Corporation. In 1976, Keene Building Products Corporation ceased operations.

Up until the late 1970s, laborers who were employed by E. J. Eddy and its successor companies applied and removed a variety of asbestos-containing materials at commercial and industrial sites throughout Western New York. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did, are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

  1. J. Eddy used many different brands of asbestos-containing materials, including Keasbey & Mattison, Ruberoid, Owens-Corning and Johns Manville. During the years that the local company was controlled by larger corporations, such as Baldwin-Ehret-Hill and Keene Corporation, asbestos-containing materials manufactured by those corporations were utilized by E. J. Eddy workers. E. J. Eddy was also supplied with asbestos materials from other local distributors, including Insulation Distributors, Inc. and Niagara Asbestos. Laborers employed by E. J. Eddy applied asbestos-containing materials at dozens of commercial and industrial job sites throughout Western New York, including:

» Bethlehem Steel

» Republic Steel

» Carborundum

» University at Buffalo

» Millard Fillmore Hospital

» Monroe Community College

» Niagara Mohawk power plants

» Rochester Gas & Electric power plants

»   Strong Memorial Hospital

» Erie County Savings Bank

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by E. J. Eddy, Inc. employees. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once

 

employed by the Keene Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Electricians Local 41

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 41 represents union electricians in Erie County. In 1891, Local 41 was originally founded as part of the National Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Local 41 is based in Orchard Park, New York, and is a member of the Buffalo Building and Construction Trades Council. Members of Local 41 perform electrical work throughout a variety of indoor and outdoor locations, including manholes, roofs, and buildings and in trenches. Local 41 electricians have participated in various projects throughout Erie County, including University at Buffalo, Main Place Mall, Erie County Medical Center, Bethlehem Steel and Marine Midland Center.

Up until the late 1970s, Local 41 electricians were exposed to asbestos during installation and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials on electrical equipment. Electricians have one of the highest incidence rates for developing mesothelioma. Before warnings were placed on asbestos-containing products in the late 1970s, electricians who worked in industrial, construction or residential industries were exposed to asbestos through the very products they installed and maintained. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Many types of electrical equipment contained asbestos, such as motor starters, contactors, arc chutes and circuit breakers. During regular operation, electrical components inside motor starters, circuit breakers and contactors opened and closed forcefully. Over time, wear and tear caused these asbestos-containing plastic parts that made up the body of electrical components to produce dust, which settled in the bottom of the control cabinet or panel box. Arc chutes, which were designed to absorb stray arcs of electricity when electrical contacts are opened and closed, shed small amounts of asbestos-containing plastic each time the contacts were operated. When electricians opened the cabinet or box in order to perform repairs or maintenance, asbestos-containing dust became airborne, which workers inhaled.

Electricians were also exposed to asbestos through the application and removal of hundreds of building products. At commercial and industrial job sites, electricians worked side-by-side with fireproofers, pipefitters, carpenters, insulators and other tradesmen. During a building’s initial construction, structural steel was typically sprayed with asbestos fireproof insulation. Electricians often disturbed the fireproof material in order to hang conduit, lighting or other electrical equipment. Steam, water and/or chemical pipes were covered with asbestos-containing pipe insulation, and these lines were typically located in the same areas where electrical conduit was installed. Joint compound, ceiling tiles, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation also contained asbestos. During commercial construction projects, electricians were often present when these asbestos-containing materials were applied.

Local 41 Electricians routinely worked in the immediate presence of acoustical contractors, including Mader Plastering and Buffalo Acoustical, who sprayed asbestos-containing fireproofing and/or applied asbestos-containing joint compound. Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles were also installed during the same time that electricians installed light fixtures. Occasionally, electricians cut asbestos-containing ceiling tiles in order to install light fixtures,

 

alarm systems or other electrical equipment. Installing or disturbing asbestos-containing materials caused asbestos fibers to become airborne, which Local 41 electricians inhaled.

At some industrial job sites, such as Republic Steel and Bethlehem Steel, electricians were exposed to asbestos-containing materials used during the manufacturing process, including raw asbestos, refractory materials and plastic molding compounds.

Inhaling dust and particles from exposure to asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked as a Local 41 electrician and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us to discuss a potential legal claim. Our services include lawsuits against manu- facturers of asbestos-containing products and claims under the New York State Workers’ Compensation Law.

 

Electro Metallurgical

In 1907, The Electro Metallurgical Company a.k.a. Electromet was established at the corner of 47th Street and Royal Avenue in Niagara Falls, New York. Electro Metallurgical produced ferro-metal alloys, tungsten, titanium, calcium carbide and acetylene. The company also provided extensive metallurgical research to other industries involved in the manufacture of carbon electrodes. In 1922, Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation (UCC) acquired The Electro Metallurgical Company as a wholly-owned subsidiary. During World War II, Electro was considered to be the largest producer of uranium metal, which was used for the Manhattan Project and ultimately for the creation of the atomic bomb and atomic reactors. Uranium processing began in April 1943 and continued until September 1949, with the exception of a standby period (September 1, 1946 – September 30, 1947). Electro was eventually absorbed into Union Carbide and operated as Union Carbide’s Electromet Division a.k.a. Union Carbide Metals Division. One of the buildings involved in processing uranium was demolished in 1958. Union Carbide operated the Niagara Falls plant until 1992. Today, the former Niagara Falls Union Carbide facility is operated by Praxair.

 

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at the Electro Metallurgical Company in Niagara Falls, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Large furnaces transformed calcium carbide and ferro-alloys into molten uranium metal at Electro. At times, these furnaces reached an internal temperature of 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Insulating cement, which contained asbestos, lined the furnaces used to melt various metals. Workers mixed the asbestos-containing cement with water and then applied it to the surface of the furnaces. The mixing process created large clouds of asbestos-containing dust that floated through the facility.

Asbestos-containing materials also insulated steam and chemical lines system at Electro. Asbestos was incorporated into insulation that covered hot water pipes and associated equipment within the building’s steam heat system. Chemical lines were also insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering, packing material and gaskets. Asbestos block insulation was applied to steam boilers and hot water tanks. When asbestos-containing insulation was handled or disturbed, it released asbestos fibers into the air and into the breathing zone of workers.

Most workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one worked at the Albany Steam Station and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

 

Radiation Exposure and EEOICPA

During World War II, Electro processed uranium metal products that were shipped to various steel plants, rolling mills and other facilities, including Argonne National Laboratory and Simonds Saw and Steel. Electro received green salt (uranium tetrafluoride) in drums from the Linde Air plant in Tonawanda, New York. Electro produced uranium metal in high heat furnaces by reducing uranium tetrafluoride with magnesium metal thereby creating an instantaneous reaction and resulting in the formation of molten uranium. Molten uranium metal was then cast into ingots, and after it was cooled, the uranium metal was removed and cleaned. The clean uranium was then melted in a vacuum furnace and cast into billets in preparation for delivery to other facilities for processing. In order to provide monetary compensation and medical benefits to atomic weapons workers who were exposed to radiation and developed cancer as a result of radiation, the United States Department of Labor added a new class of employees to the Special Exposure Cohort of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). For more information regarding EEOICPA and SEC, visit the EEOICPA section of our website.

 

Ellis Hospital

The hospital that became known as Ellis Hospital was originally established in 1885 as “The Schenectady Free Dispensary,” a two-story building on Union Street in Schenectady, New York. The five bed ward served as the Schenectady’s first medical facility. In 1893, a new 30-bed hospital opened on Jay Street and the dispensary was renamed Ellis Hospital. In 1906, a new 60-bed Ellis Hospital was established at its current location at the corner of Nott Street and Rosa Road. During November 2007 and June 2008, the services of Ellis Hospital, the former Bellevue Woman’s Hospital, and the former St. Clare’s Hospital were joined to create Ellis Medicine, a single, unified healthcare organization.

Throughout its over 125 year history, Ellis Hospital has undergone numerous building expansions and renovations. Ellis Hospital is currently one of the most advanced health information technology systems in Northeastern New York. The current facility maintains 438 inpatient beds, and offers an extensive array of inpatient and outpatient services, including cardiac, cancer, emergency, neuroscience, and women’s services.

Numerous trades, such as carpenters, electricians, pipefitters, laborers, insulators and sheet metal workers were involved in construction and renovation projects at Ellis Hospital. Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building and construction materials, including fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Steam boilers provided heat and hot water for Ellis Hospital. In order for the steam system to operate efficiently, boilers, pipes, valves and pumps within the system were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. When asbestos-containing insulation was handled or disturbed, it released asbestos fibers into the air and into the breathing zone of workers. Due to wear and tear, it was common for asbestos-containing materials to be removed and reapplied. After worn asbestos-containing insulation was removed, reapplication of asbestos insulation was necessary so that the pipes could effectively contain steam. Both, the removal and application of asbestos-containing insulation emitted large amounts of asbestos-containing dust, which workers inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Ellis Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout the New York State. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with construction or renovation projects at Ellis Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Elmer W. Davis

Elmer W. Davis Incorporated was established in 1936 in Rochester, New York, by Elmer W. Davis. It is currently one of the largest roofing contractors in New York State. Prior to 1980, Elmer W. Davis also performed a large amount of pipe covering work. Asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials utilized by Elmer W. Davis, including pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos

 

or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Elmer W. Davis was also an authorized distributor of Philip Carey and Owens Corning brands of asbestos-containing insulating materials. Davis supplied asbestos-containing insulating materials to other local contractors, such as William Summerhays & Sons, Rochester Industrial Insulation and Keene Corporation. Asbestos-containing pipe covering installed by, or sold by, Elmer W. Davis was used throughout dozens of commercial and industrial sites throughout the Rochester area including

» Kodak

» Rochester Gas & Electric

» Xerox Webster

» University of Rochester

» Monroe Community College

»   Strong Memorial Hospital

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked for Elmer W. Davis and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

 

Emerson Vocational School

Emerson Vocational School was located at 1405 Sycamore Avenue in Buffalo, New York. The land for the school was acquired in 1926, and the school was originally established as the Peckham Vocational School until it changed its name to Emerson in 1937. For sixty-two years and before closing its doors in 1999, Emerson educated and trained high school students to become skilled tradesmen and mechanics. Since then, the building has been remodeled and renamed Harvey Austin Public School 97, an elementary school. Prior to the late 1970’s, asbestos was incorporated into a wide variety of equipment and materials that the students and teachers at Emerson utilized in their daily lesson plans. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

 

At Emerson, students were taught how to repair automobile and truck brakes. Students, teachers and auto mechanics were exposed to asbestos in brake linings and pads, clutch discs, mufflers, exhaust piping, sound proofing material and gaskets. Students and teachers typically performed a blowout, a process that uses compressed air to remove dust either caused by the removal of old brake linings, and/or during the installation of new linings. After the old brake linings were removed, they were replaced with new asbestos brake linings, which were typically ground on a bench grinder and/or hand sanded to ensure a proper fit against the brake drum. Both the blowout process and grinding and sanding emitted asbestos-containing dust that the students, teachers and auto mechanics inhaled.

Because the students at Emerson were trained to work in skilled trades and in various industries, graduates of the school went on to work in fields where they had a lifelong and continuous exposure to asbestos. In addition to those who were trained to work as auto and brake mechanics, many Emerson graduates moved on to work as electricians, plumbers, millwrights, pipefitters, welders and laborers. These trades worked with and around asbestos-containing insulating materials including, pipe covering, block insulation, cement and fireproofing. Electricians were exposed to asbestos-containing cables and wires, terminal blocks and boards and arc chutes. Welders regularly used asbestos blankets and gloves. Men who worked in the construction field were exposed to a host of various asbestos materials including, joint compound, fireproofing, transite, floor tile, thinset, acoustical ceiling tiles, roofing products and attic insulation.

Students and faculty were not the only individuals exposed to asbestos at Emerson Vocational School. The school’s maintenance staff and outside contractors repaired and maintained old mechanical equipment, which was covered in asbestos insulation. Boilers and associated piping used to heat the school were insulated with asbestos-containing block and pipe insulation. Asbestos packing and gaskets were used to maintain pumps, valves and steam traps. Plaster walls were repaired and replaced, involving the use of asbestos-containing joint compound. Asbestos floor and ceiling tiles were used throughout the school and had the tendency to crack or break. Due to normal wear and tear, these materials were removed and reapplied and, in the process, emitted dangerous levels of asbestos dust and fibers that contractors and maintenance personnel inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. Our attorneys have the combined experience of more than thirty years representing victims of mesothelioma. If you were once a laborer or maintenance employee who worked at the Emerson Vocational School in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Empire State Plaza

The Empire State Plaza is an office complex in Albany, New York, which is comprised of 10 buildings, including numerous state office buildings; a world-class modern art collection; New York State’s Museum; Library and Archives; a performing arts center; convention center; and other public structures. Covering almost 100 acres, the Empire State Plaza is home to the offices of over 10,000 state employees. Empire State Plaza, also known as the South

 

Mall, was the brainchild of New York Governor Nelson D. Rockefeller who worked with local and state leaders in order to facilitate the construction of the Plaza between 1965 and 1976.

During the construction of Empire State Plaza, workers complained of poor working conditions and some filed lawsuits. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials. Asbestos-containing fireproofing was one of the most widely used and most dangerous materials used throughout many of the buildings in the Empire State Plaza. During the fireproofing process, a building’s structural steel is coated with an asbestos-containing fire resistant material, which protects it from high temperatures or fire damage. The application process emitted large clouds of asbestos dust and fibers into the air, which workers inhaled. Even long after this material was applied, the smallest vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. In addition to fire proofers, iron workers, plumbers and electricians who worked with rebar and conduits on or in the vicinity of fireproofing material, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos.

In 1986, a fire in Agency Building 4 caused severe damage to two floors of the building and released asbestos fibers into the air even as firefighters battled the blaze. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can lead to the development of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with construction or maintenance projects at at the Empire State Plaza, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Erie County Medical Center

The hospital that became known as Erie County Medical Center (ECMC) was founded in 1905 as Municipal Hospital on East Ferry Street in Buffalo, New York. In 1918, the hospital moved to its present location on Grider Street, and it was renamed Buffalo City Hospital. The hospital was renamed again in 1939,

when it became known as Edward J. Meyer Memorial Hospital, after Dr. Edward Meyer, who was a former hospital administrator. In 1978, a new thirteen-story hospital building was built, replacing the old hospital building, which was demolished. The hospital was renamed Erie County Medical Center (ECMC). It is the largest hospital in Western New York, with 550 inpatient beds. ECMC is designated by the New York State Department of Health as Western New York’s Regional Trauma Center and Regional Burn Treatment Center. Erie County Medical

 

Center is also a teaching hospital affiliated with the University at Buffalo’s School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

Up until the late 1970’s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized during the construction of ECMC. Workers who handled these asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, boilers and associated equipment throughout the heating system at ECMC. Handling, cutting and applying asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Structural steel at ECMC was protected against potential fire damage through the use of asbestos-containing fireproof insulation. Fireproofing was manufactured as a dry mixture of asbestos, cement and linen. Raw fireproofing material was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. This process created tremendous amounts of asbestos-containing dust, which remained suspended in the air for days. Laborers who worked in the vicinity of where the fireproofing took place, may have inhaled asbestos dust and fibers.

Asbestos was also incorporated into the acoustical plaster that was applied to ceilings and walls at ECMC. Because a hospital setting requires the reduction of noise in patient rooms, hallways and offices, acoustical plaster was utilized throughout the hospital. Asbestos was used as a filler ingredient in acoustical plaster because of its inherent strength. The plaster was manufactured as a dry powder and mixed with water in order to prepare it for application. When workers poured and mixed acoustical plaster, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air and inhaled by workers.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Erie County Medical Center (ECMC) were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction or renovations at Erie County Medical Center and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Erie County Savings Bank

The Erie County Savings Bank at Sheldon Square was once considered the heart of the commercial district in Downtown Buffalo. The Bank was constructed between 1890 and 1893. Designed by renowned architect George B. Post, who was also responsible for the design of the Statler Hotel, the Bank was constructed from pink granite brought in from Jonesboro, Maine. The Erie County Savings Bank’s rugged texture, massive stone walls and dramatic semicircle arches were all indicative of the Richardson Romanesque style of architecture popular at the time of construction. Located at 16 Niagara Street, this ten story building housed generations of hard-earned savings. In 1967, the Erie County Savings Bank at Sheldon Square closed and moved to a different location at

 

the Main Place Mall, where it continued to operate until its closure in 1992. The building at Sheldon Square was demolished shortly after the Bank’s closure.

Prior to Erie County Savings Bank’s closure in 1967, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at the Erie County Savings Bank at Sheldon Square in Buffalo, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one once worked construction or maintenance at the Erie County Savings Bank at Sheldon Square in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Erie Forge & Steel

The roots of Erie Forge and Steel Company located at West 16th and Greengarden Boulevard in Erie, Pennsylvania, can be traced back to 1903, when the company operated as a small forge and machine shop known as the Erie Forge Company. In 1912, the company was officially named Erie Forge and Steel Company. At the beginning of World War I, Erie Forge and Steel Company entered into an agreement with the United States Navy to manufacture gun forgings and destroyer shafts. The agreement allowed the Navy to construct a much larger plant on the property. The Navy broke ground in November 1917, and the first heat of steel was poured in May 1918. The plant remained property of the Navy until August 1920, when it was purchased by the Erie Forge and Steel Company. In the years that followed, the steel plant grew rapidly and employed approximately 1,600 workers during its peak years. The National Forge Company acquired the plant in the late 1960s and used the plant to manufacture new and refurbished propulsion shafts for U.S. Navy ships and submarines. In 1989, the company was sold to National Forge employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP), and the company was renamed Erie Forge and Steel, Inc. Today, Erie Forge and Steel, Inc. operates as a subsidiary of WHEMCO, Inc., and it employs approximately 70 people.

Prior to the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were installed and removed at steel plants throughout the United States. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Similar to many other steel plants, laborers at Erie Forge and Steel used hot tops during the steel-making process. A hot top is a cast iron device located on the top of a steel mold, and it traps impurities that rise out of the steel as the ingot cools and solidifies. In order to protect the hot top from damage, the interior of the hot top is lined with refractory materials. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was used as a refractory material because of its ability to withstand high temperatures. The hot tops used at Erie Forge and Steel were lined with either brick and asbestos-containing mortar or asbestos insulating boards.

Asbestos insulating boards were primarily manufactured by Ferro Engineering and Foseco Inc. The number of boards placed inside a hot top depended on the size of the mold, which ranged in size from one foot to ten feet wide. Even the act of handling an asbestos insulating board emitted asbestos fibers into the air. After each ingot or steel mold was cast,

 

the asbestos insulating boards inside the hot top turned to ash and required replacement. Laborers used an air hose to remove the asbestos-containing ash from the hot top. This action created a cloud of asbestos-containing dust, which was inhaled by laborers working on the hot top and anyone else in the surrounding vicinity.

If you or a loved one worked at Erie Forge and Steel in Erie, Pennsylvania, you may have been exposed to asbestos and could be at risk for developing mesothelioma or another asbestos related disease. Even those who were not in direct contact with hot tops or asbestos materials remain at risk. If you or a loved one worked at Erie Forge and Steel and have since been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us to discuss your legal rights.

 

Fairchild Republic Co.

From 1931 to 1987, Fairchild Republic Co. manufactured aircraft and aircraft parts in East Farmingdale, Long Island, New York. Examples of Fairchild Republic planes include, but are not limited to, the F-84, the P-47 Thunderbolt, and the A-10 Warthog.

Many aircraft components contained asbestos, including engine insu- lation, electrical wiring, brakes, cockpit heating systems, engine heat shields, torque valves, gaskets, and cargo bay insulation.

Employees were also exposed to asbestos while maintaining the facility itself. Manufacturing bay areas were heated by steam blast heaters, powered by steam generated by boilers. The components of the heating systems (i.e., pipes, pumps, and valves) contained asbestos gaskets and packing inside. The high heat of these systems was cause for much removal and replacement of asbestos parts, causing dust and a widespread risk of asbestos exposure to all workers in the manufacturing bay areas.

Additional exposure to asbestos at Fairchild Republic came from the building materials used in construction of the facility. Many workers were exposed to asbestos dust due to regular maintenance and repairs of the facility through the flooring, roofing, wallboard, spackling, and spray-on insulation.

It is important to secure legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Fairchild Republic and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC regarding your legal rights.

Federal Reserve Building

From 1957 until 2004, The Federal Reserve Building located on Delaware Avenue in downtown, Buffalo was home to the Buffalo branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Since 2006, this building has served as the corporate headquarters for the New Era Cap Company. During the construction of the Federal Reserve Building in the mid 1950’s, a variety of asbestos-containing building materials were incorporated into its construction. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials. Asbestos-containing fireproofing was one of the most widely used and most dangerous materials used during the construction of the Federal Reserve Building. During the fireproofing process, a building’s structural steel is coated with a fire resistant material to protect it from high temperatures or fire damage. The fireproof insulation used during the construction of the Federal Reserve Building was a mixture of asbestos, linen and cement. This material was packaged in bags, and dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and then sprayed onto the Federal Reserve Building’s steel substructure. During the application process of fireproofing, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where the material was being applied. Even long after this material was applied, the smallest vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. In addition to fire proofers, iron workers, plumbers and electricians who worked with rebar and conduits on or in the vicinity of fireproofing material, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering and block insulation were also applied to pipe work and boilers throughout the Federal Reserve Building. Handling and cutting asbestos-containing pipe covering and block insulation emitted asbestos fibers into the air. Insulating cement was applied on pipe elbows. This cement was manufactured as a dry powder and was mixed with water to form a paste-like substance. When the dry mix was poured into a tub or bucket and mixed, a cloud of asbestos-containing dust was released into air, where it remained for quite some time. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Various unions and companies throughout Western New York employed many laborers who worked on construction projects, such as the Federal Reserve Building. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of the Federal Reserve Building and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regard- ing your legal rights.

Ferro Corporation

In 1919, Allan Ramming established the Electro Refractories and Alloys Corporation in six buildings on Willett Road in Blasdell, New York. The company added an abrasives division in 1949 and changed its name to the Electro Refractories and Abrasives Corporation. It manufactured abrasives, refractories, grinding wheels and crucibles used in foundries. In 1968, Electro merged with Ferro Corporation, and it operated as separate refractories and abrasives division within Ferro. Abrasives Division management completed a buyout from Ferro in 1987 and became a separate company known as Electro Abrasives. In 1992, Vesuvius USA acquired the Electro Refractories division from Ferro. In 2008, the Vesuvius plant closed and all production was outsourced to foreign manufacturers. Among its workforce, the company was commonly known as Ferro.

Up until the late 1970’s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized at Electro in the manufacturing process and during maintenance procedures. Block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, gaskets, packing and electrical wires contained asbestos. Asbestos was also incorporated into drying trays used during the manufacturing process. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used in the manufacturing process and to heat the buildings at Ferro. A network of pipes delivered steam to manufacturing equipment and radiators. Asbestos-containing insulation was applied to boilers, pipes, valves, pumps and other equipment throughout the steam system. Workers who performed maintenance within the steam system removed asbestos insulation in order to gain access to the equipment. New insulation was applied when these procedures were completed. The process of removing and applying insulation caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were utilized in order to ensure a tight seal between flanges on pipes, pumps and valves. Gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Cutting gasket material emitted asbestos fibers into the air. During maintenance and repair procedures on pipes and pumps, gaskets were removed and replaced. Scraping or removing gaskets also produced asbestos-containing dust, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing packing material was also used to prevent leaks from pump shafts and valve stems. Workers replaced packing material during maintenance and repairs. Old packing material was pulled from valve and pump glands. New packing material was cut and manipulated to fit the diameter of the valve stem or pump shaft. Removing and installing packing material caused asbestos-containing dust and fibers to become airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC has represented two former Ferro workers who were diagnosed with mesothelioma and one worker diagnosed with lung cancer. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at Ferro (also known as Electro Refractories and Abrasives) in Blasdell, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Fiberite Corporation

In 1947, Benjamin and Rudolph Miller established Fiberite Corporation in Winona, Minnesota. In its earliest years, Fiberite manufactured plastic molding compounds and molded plastic products, including gun stocks, telephones and food service equipment. Beginning in the 1950s, the company’s product line was focused on the aerospace, military and food service industries. Among the notable projects that included Fiberite molded plastic products were rocket nozzles for the Apollo program, the Trident nuclear missile and the Space Shuttle program. The ownership of the company changed hands several times throughout the 1980s. In 1997, Fiberite was acquired by Cytec Industries and became part of the Cytec Aerospace Materials division.

Up until the early 1980s, Fiberite incorporated asbestos into some of its plastic molding compounds. Asbestos posed a high health-risk danger to mold shop workers who molded plastic parts from asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, as well as to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos-containing molding compounds into finished products. When asbestos-containing molded plastic products are manipulated, drilled or sanded, asbestos dust and fibers can easily become airborne and inhaled or ingested. Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer because you worked with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Finch Pruyn Papermill

Finch Paper, formerly Finch Pruyn Paper was founded by Jeremiah and Daniel Finch, together with Samuel Pruyn in 1865 in Glen Falls, New York. Between 1900 and 1910, a groundwood pulp mill, using spruce and balsam, was built. In the 1920’s the company shifted its focus to manufacturing newsprint and hanging paper used for wallpaper. During the Great Depression, the company invested in new grinders to improve wood-chip production, while a turbine generated electricity. The company also had a bleaching facility to convert its newsprint to high-quality for magazine and book paper.

Finch Paper: Courtesy of Glens Falls Business Journal

During the 1950’s and 60’s all three paper machines were completely rebuilt, but by the 1965, production doubled and a fourth paper machine was built. New products included paper for envelopes, maps, greeting cards, gift wrap, lace paper, box liners and labels.

In the 1970’s Biomass power boilers were installed. The company’s power plant used a cogeneration steam turbine.

Unfortunately, workers at the Finch Pruyn Papermill were exposed to asbestos in a variety of ways. As in most manufacturing facilities, asbestos was used as an insulator in boilers and equipment used to generate their products, such as the brakes on rolling machines. Asbestos pipe covering, such as transite, was used to cover pipes leading to and from the boilers which created steam for heating the plant, as well as in the process of making paper. Pipe dryers also contained asbestos in the gaskets, which often required repair and repacking.

Workers were also exposed to asbestos in the routine maintenance in the facility itself from flooring to ceiling tiles. Papermills are dusty places in general. Sadly, workers would bring clothes home to be laundered, bringing home the dust and exposing their loved ones to harmful asbestos, as well.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease as a result of working at Finch Pruyn Papermill, please contact us today for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Ford Stamping Plant

The Ford Stamping Plant is located along the shores of Lake Erie at 3663 S. Lake Shore Road in Hamburg, New York. The plant opened its doors in 1950 and has continuously manufactured sheet metal stampings including, quarter panels, roofs, doors, hoods, floor pans and body sides. The labor force at this plant consists of members of the United Auto Workers Union Local #897. Asbestos was frequently incorporated into products that the Hamburg Ford plant manufactured, and asbestos also insulated a wide variety of machinery and equipment at the plant. Asbestos was used as an insulation material and in the manufacturing process from the opening of the plant through to the late 1970s. Retirees and senior workers who worked at the Hamburg plant are at the greatest risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

UAW members who worked at Ford were exposed to asbestos through a wide variety of applications. Ford manufactured asbestos-containing automobile parts, and Ford employees were called upon to apply an asbestos-containing, sound proof material to the inside of car doors and other metal stamped products. Ford employees also worked in the vicinity of machinery that contained asbestos. Metal stamping involved the use of large presses, which turned the sheet metal into formed auto body parts. These presses used asbestos-containing brakes, and each time the machines were cycled, some of the asbestos rubbed away from the brake linings or pads and into the breathing zone of workers.

Asbestos was also used in the maintenance and upkeep of the plant. Structural steel, stairwells and ceilings were sprayed with asbestos fireproofing. Hot water and steam pipes were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe insulation. Boilers and furnaces were insulated with asbestos block and cement. Pumps and valves were sealed with asbestos gaskets and rope packing. Even in the business offices, asbestos-containing joint compound was used to finish drywall, and asbestos was a component of floor and ceiling tiles. Of course, any individual exposure to any one of these products varied based upon a worker’s years of service and their proximity to the asbestos-containing materials.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former workers and retirees from the Ford Stamping plant in Hamburg, New York. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Ford Stamping plant and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Foster Wheeler

Foster Wheeler was still a huge market force when it was incorporated in 1927. It was formed by the merger of the Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Company and the Power Specialty Company.  Originally founded in 1891, Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Company produced steam condensers, pumps and heat exchangers that were used in the electric power and marine industries. The Power Specialty Company was formed in 1900 in New York City, and held manufacturing facilities in Dansville, New York. While the Power Specialty Company originally manufactured waterworks equipment, it quickly branched off into designing and manufacturing boiler components. It also took a very active role in serving the electrical power industry. Both the Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Company and the Power Specialty Company individually enjoyed a close relationship with the United States armed forces, a trend that would continue once the two companies merged in 1927 to form the Foster Wheeler Corporation.

After the merger, the company expanded its product line to include cooling towers, evaporators and feed water heaters. In 1931, the company acquired the D. Connelly Boiler Company, which allowed for additional production of steam generator system components. Foster Wheeler also experienced a great deal of growth during the wars of the twentieth century because of the growing needs of the armed forces.

Unfortunately, asbestos-containing materials and products were not absent from Foster Wheelers product line or its manufacturing facility. Boilers were a very well known asbestos containing product that Foster Wheeler manufactured. Boilers are used in a variety of industries for several different projects, including marine vessel and energy production. Boilers are intended to act as a closed vessel to heat water, liquid or steam for use in other mechanical processes. The boilers were commonly covered in sheets of asbestos-containing block insulation. Workers that manufactured or maintained and repaired these boilers could have been exposed to asbestos, including boilermakers, millwrights or pipe coverers.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at Foster Wheeler and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Freihofer Baking Company

Charles Freihofer founded the Freihofer Baking Company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1884. His business quickly boomed and on March 12, 1913, his brothers William, Edwin and Frank Freihofer established the Freihofer Baking Company in Troy, New York. The Freihofer Baking Company was an instant success in Troy. By 1914, another plant was constructed in Schenectady, New York, and in 1915, a third plant was built in Albany, New York. In addition to being known for chocolate chip cookies and an extensive line of bread products, Freihofer Baking Company is also known for establishing the nation’s first computerized bakery in 1984.

The Freihofer Baking Company was owned and managed by the Freihofer family until General Foods acquired the company in 1987. General Foods later sold it to Best Foods in New Jersey. In order to consolidate production, all baking was relocated to the two Albany plants located on Prospect Avenue. These facilities are still in use today. The current bread-making facility was built in 1972, and the cake plant was built in 1979. In 2009, the company changed hands once again and became a subsidiary of Bimbo Bakeries. The Freihofer bakeries, which employ more than 700 people, produce baked goods not only for the local market, but also for distribution throughout New England, New York and New Jersey.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance of the Freihofer Baking Company in Albany, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Freihofer Baking Company in Capital District and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Garfield Molding Co., Inc.

GARFIELD MOLDING COMPANY was established in 1908, and was located at 10 Midland Avenue in Wallington, New Jersey.

Garfield was a Manufacturing plant that made different types of plastic molded products for various industries.

During the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, some of the molding compounds that Garfield used to make their plastic molded products contained asbestos.

The companies that manufactured and supplied asbestos containing molding compounds to Garfield Molding Co. knew about the health hazards of asbestos but they did not warn Garfield Molding Co. or its employees of these health hazards.

Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Molders, finishers and other laborers at Garfield Molding Co. were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process not knowing it could harm them.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos containing plastic molding compounds but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a family member ever worked at Garfield Molding Company at any time during either the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1970’s and have contracted mesothelioma or lung cancer, please con- tact the attorneys at Lipsitz & Ponterio, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos related injuries.

Garlock

Garlock Sealing Technologies is a manufacturer of fluid-sealing products, including gaskets and compression packing. Founded in 1887 by Olin Garlock, the Garlock Packing Company’s primary manufacturing facility is located in Palmyra, New York. Garlock currently operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of EnPro Industries, Inc. (NYSE: NPO). Prior to December 31, 2000, Garlock incorporated asbestos into its products, including asbestos cloth, gaskets and packing materials. Additionally, equipment at Garlock’s plant was covered in asbestos-containing pipe covering and block insulation. In previous years, hundreds of asbestos claims were brought against Garlock. On June 5, 2010, Garlock Sealing Technologies filed a voluntary petition for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of North Carolina in order to establish a trust to resolve all current and future asbestos claims against the company (In re Garlock Sealing Technologies, No. 10-31607, W.D. N.C. Bkcy.). Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, as well as lung cancer and other diseases.

Raw asbestos fiber was delivered to Garlock in 100 pound bales wrapped in plastic. These bales were cut open, and the asbestos was dumped into a hopper and broken apart by hand to make the fibers easier to process. The asbestos fibers were then sent through a carding machine, which aligned the fibers in order to create a yarn. Handling and processing raw asbestos emitted clouds of asbestos fibers into the air. At times, the asbestos clouds were so thick that it became difficult to see. Anyone who worked in the vicinity of this process likely inhaled asbestos dust and fibers.

After the asbestos fiber was processed, it was spun into yarn and turned into thread on the spinners and creel. As the machines spun the yarn, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air. Workers used a loom to weave asbestos thread into asbestos cloth. Asbestos rope was braided from strands of yarn coated with a baked-on lubricant. Both processes emitted large amounts of asbestos into the air, which workers subsequently inhaled.

Gasket material manufactured by Garlock often contained asbestos. Raw asbestos fibers were added to a mix of materials, including rubber, filler materials and staining agents. These materials were mixed into a slurry and compressed into a mold or sheet gasket material. Raw asbestos fibers were added to the slurry to increase the strength and heat resistance of the gasket. Adding asbestos to the mixture prior to the molding process caused fibers to become airborne. After the molding process was complete, some gaskets were pre-punched according to customer specification. Punching the gaskets emitted asbestos fibers from the gasket material and produced asbestos-containing dust.

Asbestos-containing materials were also used in the maintenance and upkeep of Garlock’s Palmyra plant. Asbestos insulation covered steam lines and boilers. Due to normal wear and tear, these materials were removed and reapplied and, in the process, emitted dangerous levels of asbestos dust and fibers that contractors, maintenance personnel and workers inhaled. Sawing pipe covering and block insulation produced a great amount of asbestos dust which remained suspended in the air for some time after application or removal processes.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at Garlock’s Palmyra facility. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Garlock, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to con- tact us regarding your legal rights.

General Electric

In the 1870s and 1880s, noted inventor Thomas Edison established numerous companies in order to invent and manufacture electrical equipment, including Edison Lamp Company, Edison Machine Works and Edison Electric Light Company. In 1889, Edison merged his companies and formed the Edison General Electric Company. As the result of a merger with the Thomson-Houston Electric Company in 1892, the General Electric Company (GE) was established with its headquarters located in Schenectady, New York. Over the next century, GE became an innovator in many fields, including power generation, household appliances, jet engines, plastics and military hardware.

General Electric grew to have a very large presence throughout New York State. The Capital District (Albany/Schenectady/Troy region), in particular, was home to many of GE’s largest plants. GE plants were located in:

» Schenectady – Main Plant

» Fort Edward

» Waterford – Silicone

» Selkirk – Plastic

» Niskayuna – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory

» Elmira

» Hudson Falls

» Malta

» Syracuse – Electronics Park

» Utica

In recent years, many former employees at General Electric have developed and died of mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. General Electric workers were exposed to asbestos dust from working with and in the vicinity of a wide variety of asbestos-containing products, including thermal insulation in the form of pipe covering block and cement; sprayed-on products for sound proofing and thermal insulation; joint compound; and plastic molding compound. In the process of representing GE workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at a General Electric facility, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

General Electric Brockport Housewares Division

General Electric constructed a plant in Brockport, New York, in 1948 in order to manufacture plastic component parts for some of its small household appliances. The plant was located on State Street in Brockport and sat on 28.6 acres of land. Workers manufactured plastic parts for retail housewares, such as all-purpose food mixers, blenders, electric can openers, an electric knife, knife sharpeners, food processors, electric skillets, sauce pans and other small kitchen appliances. At the height of the Brockport plant’s operations, it is estimated that General Electric employed as many as 1,100 workers. The 150,000-square foot Brockport facility operated as General Electric Housewares Division until 1984 when it closed its doors. Black and Decker purchased the property and continued operations there through 1986.

Prior to the early 1980s, asbestos was a component of high heat temperature, raw, plastic molding materials. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer. Asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds were used in the process of making hard plastic component parts for the various small appliances manufactured at G.E. Brockport Housewares Division. Asbestos posed a high health-risk danger to mold shop workers who molded plastic parts from asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, as well as to mold shop workers who drilled and sanded finished plastic parts made from asbestos-containing molding compounds. When asbestos-containing molded plastic products are manipulated, drilled or sanded, asbestos dust and fibers can easily become airborne and inhaled or ingested. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at General Electric Brockport Housewares Division. We have represented former and retired General Electric workers in their legal claims for mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at General Electric Brockport Housewares Division and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

General Electric Electronics Park

In 1947, General Electric (GE) constructed the headquarters for its electronics division, Electronics Park, in Liverpool, New York. Electronics Park consisted of nine buildings on 155 acres. In Building 5, GE manufactured consumer electronics, including televisions and radios. In Building 7, radar and sonar equipment was manufactured for the United States military. In numerous other buildings at Electronics Park, GE manufactured specialty products, such as fax machines and navigation systems. During its peak production years, GE employed nearly 19,000 people at Electronics Park. In 1980, General Electric ceased manufacturing consumer electronics at Electronics Park, and in 1992, GE sold the facility to Martin Marietta.

Asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used in the maintenance and upkeep of the buildings located at Electronics Park, including block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement. Workers who applied and maintained asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The powerhouse was located in Building 10 at Electronics Park. It contained three boilers that supplied steam to all buildings on-site. Steam was utilized to heat buildings and during the manufacturing process. In order to maintain a stable internal temperature in the steam system, asbestos-containing insulation was applied to pipes, boilers, pumps, valves and other equipment. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed the insulation to gain access to the equipment. When maintenance or repair procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. Removing and applying insulation to equipment in the steam system caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Cathode ray tubes (CRTs) for television sets were manufactured in Building 5. Electric ovens used during the CRT manufacturing process were covered in asbestos-containing block insulation and insulating cement. Workers removed the asbestos-containing insulation in order to access the ovens for maintenance or repair. New insulation was applied after the maintenance or repair procedure was complete. Applying and removing block insulation and insulating cement to the ovens emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the air, which was inhaled by nearby workers.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at General Electric Electronics Park in Liverpool, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

General Electric Plastics, Selkirk

In 1966, General Electric constructed a plant in Selkirk, New York, in order to manufacture thermoplastic molding compound. The GE Selkirk plant consisted of nearly forty buildings on 700 acres of land, and it employed around 500 people. In 2007, Saudi Basic Industrial Corporation (SABIC) acquired the Selkirk facility, and it was renamed SABIC Innovative Plastics. The molding compound manufactured at the Selkirk plant is utilized in many different applications, including automotive, electronics and plumbing supplies.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous insulating materials utilized at GE Selkirk. Block insulation, pipe covering, gaskets, packing material and insulating cement contained asbestos. Employees and contractors who worked at GE Selkirk were at risk for asbestos exposure. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Asbestos-containing insulating cement, block insulation and pipe covering lined boilers, pipes, pumps and valves associated with the steam system at GE Selkirk. Asbestos insulation also covered equipment utilized during the manufacturing process of plastic. Due to wear and tear, asbestos insulation was removed and reapplied during maintenance procedures so that the equipment within the steam system could operate efficiently. When asbestos containing insulation was removed and reapplied, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets ensured a tight seal between pipe flanges, pumps and valves, which were utilized throughout steam and chemical lines. Asbestos-containing packing material was wrapped around pump shafts and valve stems in order to prevent fluid leaks. Gaskets and packing material were often replaced during maintenance on pumps and valves. The replacement process emitted asbestos dust, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked at the General Electric Plastics facility in Selkirk, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

General Electric Schenectady Plant

In 1886, Thomas Edison moved the Edison Machine Works from New York City to Schenectady, New York because of lower labor costs and land prices. The Edison Machine Works merged with several other Edison companies in 1889, forming Edison General Electric. A merger with the Thomson-Houston Electrical Company in 1892 created the General Electric Company (GE), and the plant became known as the General Electric Schenectady Works, which served as the company’s headquarters. GE Schenectady Works expanded rapidly during the first half of the 20th Century to include nearly 250 buildings on 628 acres of land. During World War II, and during the company’s peak production years, the plant employed nearly 40,000 people. Numerous electrical products were manufactured at GE Schenectady, including turbine generators, electronic components, electric motors, consumer electrical goods and electrical wire.

In recent years, the Schenectady plant has decreased its production due to GE’s outsourcing of jobs to locations with substantially lower labor costs and occupational safety standards. Many of the buildings that employed thousands of workers during the past century have been demolished. A notable exception is Building 273, which is home to GE’s Large Steam Turbine Generator Division. As one of the largest manufacturing buildings in the world, Building 273 manufactures massive steam turbines and generators for electrical utility customers worldwide.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into insulating materials utilized at GE Schenectady. Pipe covering, block insulation, gaskets, insulating cement and packing material contained asbestos. When asbestos-containing materials were removed or applied, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Buildings throughout the GE Schenectady plant were heated by steam radiators. Steam was produced in the powerhouses (Buildings 13, 61 and 265), and it was delivered to the buildings through an underground network of pipes. During repairs to the steam system, workers removed asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation in order to access the equipment. When repairs were completed, new asbestos insulation was applied. In order to prevent leaks, pump shafts and valve stems within the steam system were wrapped with asbestos-containing packing material. During maintenance procedures, workers pulled the used packing material out of the pump or valve using a corkscrew-like device called a packing puller. New packing material was then cut to the proper length and installed. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials gave rise to high levels of asbestos-containing dust, which workers inhaled.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information on the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at General Electric in Schenectady, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

General Electric Silicone Products, Waterford

In 1947, General Electric (GE) constructed a silicone manufacturing facility on an 800-acre site in Waterford, New York. The GE Waterford plant manufactures silicone compounds used in various applications, including building materials, automotive parts, aerospace components and cosmetics. During its peak production years during the 1960s and 1970s, GE Waterford employed over 1,000 people. In 2006, the facility was acquired by Apollo Global Management and was renamed Momentive Performance Materials.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at the General Electric Silicone Products plant in Waterford, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at General Electric in Waterford, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

General Foods Corporation

General Foods Corporation was founded in 1929 after a series of corporate mergers. In 1954 General Foods built a facility in Tarrytown, New York in Westchester County. General Foods was later purchased by Phillip Morris in 1985, and became Kraft Foods in 1989. Another change came in 1995, when Kraft Foods merged with Heinz.

Unfortunately, employees at Tarrytown General Foods were exposed to asbestos via the heating and steam system and laboratory equipment. Asbestos was released during routine maintenance of the boiler door gasket. Asbestos insulation was disturbed while maintaining the many pipes, pumps and valves that connected the boilers throughout the facility, causing exposure to all those workers in the area. The high heat of the steam boilers often caused the breakdown of gaskets. The removal of asbestos material involved scraping and wire brushing, which also released asbestos dust into the air.

Through the 1970’s asbestos was used in the laboratory for a variety of reasons, causing dangerous exposure to General Foods workers. Workers were provided with protective clothing made from asbestos textiles, including lab coats, aprons, mitts and blankets. Fume hoods, tables and countertops, Bunsen burner diffuser mats, centrifuges, and gauze pads all contained asbestos materials. If you or a family member ever worked at General Foods and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact the attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos-related injuries.

General Industries Company

GENERAL INDUSTRY COMPANY was founded in 1915, and was located in Elyria, Ohio.

General Industries was a Manufacturing plant that made different types of plastic molded products for various industries.

During the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, some of the molding compounds that General Industries used to make their plastic molded products contained asbestos.

The companies that manufactured and supplied asbestos containing molding compounds to General Industries Co., knew about the health hazards of asbestos but they did not warn General Industries or its employees of these health hazards.

Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Molders, finishers and other laborers at General Industries Co. were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process not knowing it could harm them.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos containing plastic molding compounds but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a family member ever worked at General Industries at their Elyria, Ohio plant at any time during either the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1970’s and have contracted mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact the attorneys at Lipsitz & Ponterio, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos related injuries.

General Foods Corporation

General Foods Corporation was founded in 1929 after a series of corporate mergers. In 1954 General Foods built a facility in Tarrytown, New York in Westchester County. General Foods was later purchased by Phillip Morris in 1985, and became Kraft Foods in 1989. Another change came in 1995, when Kraft Foods merged with Heinz.

Unfortunately, employees at Tarrytown General Foods were exposed to asbestos via the heating and steam system and laboratory equipment. Asbestos was released during routine maintenance of the boiler door gasket. Asbestos insulation was disturbed while maintaining the many pipes, pumps and valves that connected the boilers throughout the facility, causing exposure to all those workers in the area. The high heat of the steam boilers often caused the breakdown of gaskets. The removal of asbestos material involved scraping and wire brushing, which also released asbestos dust into the air.

Through the 1970’s asbestos was used in the laboratory for a variety of reasons, causing dangerous exposure to General Foods workers. Workers were provided with protective clothing made from asbestos textiles, including lab coats, aprons, mitts and blankets. Fume hoods, tables and countertops, Bunsen burner diffuser mats, centrifuges, and gauze pads all contained asbestos materials. If you or a family member ever worked at General Foods and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact the attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos-related injuries.

General Industries Company

GENERAL INDUSTRY COMPANY was founded in 1915, and was located in Elyria, Ohio.

General Industries was a Manufacturing plant that made different types of plastic molded products for various industries.

During the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, some of the molding compounds that General Industries used to make their plastic molded products contained asbestos.

The companies that manufactured and supplied asbestos containing molding compounds to General Industries Co., knew about the health hazards of asbestos but they did not warn General Industries or its employees of these health hazards.

Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Molders, finishers and other laborers at General Industries Co. were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process not knowing it could harm them.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos containing plastic molding compounds but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a family member ever worked at General Industries at their Elyria, Ohio plant at any time during either the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1970’s and have contracted mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact the attorneys at Lipsitz & Ponterio, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos related injuries.

General Mills

In 1903, the WashburnCrosby Milling Company established a flour mill adjacent to the Frontier Grain Elevator on South Michigan Avenue in Buffalo, New York. In 1928, Washburn-Crosby became General Mills, after a merger with twenty-six other milling companies. The mill expanded steadily throughout the early Twentieth Century, and by 1941, it was the most productive flour mill in the world. In 1941, General Mills also began to manufacture breakfast cereal. Buffalo’s General Mills facility still produces world-famous brand names, such as Cheerios and Wheaties. The General Mills facility in Buffalo remains one of the company’s primary cereal and flour manufacturing facilities, and it employs around 500 workers.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials covered production machinery, pipes and associated equipment throughout the General Mills facility in Buffalo. Due to wear and tear, contractors and maintenance personnel frequently removed and applied asbestos-containing materials. When workers handled asbestos-containing insulation, asbestos dust and fibers were released into the air and into the breathing zones of anyone in the vicinity. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without masks or protective gear. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Steam boilers, furnaces, ovens and kettles used in the manufacturing processes at General Mills were covered with asbestos block insulation in order to retain heat inside the equipment. Steam and hot water pipes throughout the General Mills facility were covered with asbestos containing pipe covering. Insulating cement covered valves, pumps and pipe elbows. When these asbestos-containing materials were applied or removed, asbestos fibers were released into the air, which nearby workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing thinset mortar was also utilized during the repair and reconstruction of tile floors and walls. Thinset was manufactured as a dry powder. Workers mixed it with water and applied it using a notched trowel. When thinset mortar was mixed with water, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at General Mills in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Genesee Brewing Company

The Genesee Brewing Company brewery was founded in 1878 by Mathius Knodolf. The brewery is located on St. Paul Street in Rochester, New York, and it brews Genesee brand beers, as well as different brand names under contract for various beer companies. The Genesee Brewing Company is one of the largest breweries in the United States, and it also markets beer under Shea’s Brewery, Dundee’s Brewery and Fred Koch Brewery names. Genesee Brewing Company was owned by the Wehle family until 2000, when company executives acquired the company and renamed it the High Falls Brewing Company. In 2009, the brewery was acquired by North American Breweries, and its name was reverted back to Genesee Brewing Company.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance at Genesee Brewing Company. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed by Genesee Brewing Company, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Georgia-Pacific

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, has represented numerous Georgia-Pacific employees who developed asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma and lung cancer as a result of working at its various manufacturing facilities throughout the United States. Prior to the mid to late 1970s, Georgia-Pacific manufactured asbestos-containing joint compounds, plaster, bedding compounds, texture mixes and laminating compounds. In addition, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance of Georgia-Pacific plants. As a result of exposure to asbestos, many former Georgia-Pacific workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

History of Georgia-Pacific Corporation

In 1927, Owen R. Cheatham founded Georgia Hardwood Lumber, a wholesaler of hardwood lumber. After a series of name changes and the subsequent expansion of its product line, the company became the Georgia-Pacific Corporation in 1956. Throughout the 1950s, Georgia Pacific participated in a $160 million timberland-acquisition program in the western and southern United States in order to vastly increase the company’s profit margin. Georgia Pacific borrowed heavily from banks and insurance companies expecting that the proceeds gained from future timber sales would more than double the required return on investment. With this aggressive business model, Georgia-Pacific became the timber industry’s leader through numerous acquisitions of lumber and plywood mills, as well as timber forests, paper mills and gypsum plants.

Since its initial establishment, Georgia-Pacific has grown to become one of the world’s leading manufacturers and marketers of building products, pulp, paper, packaging, and chemicals. Georgia-Pacific owns numerous subsidiary companies, including Bestwall Gypsum Company, Vanity Fair Paper Mills, Fort James Corporation, and Exchange Oil and Gas Corporation. It was a publicly held company that was listed on the New York Stock Exchange from 1949 – 2005, when it was acquired as a wholly owned subsidiary of Koch Industries, Inc. Today, Georgia-Pacific is a privately owned company that is headquartered in Atlanta and employs more than 40,000 workers at approximately 300 plants worldwide.

Georgia-Pacific Akron, New York Plant

In 1920, the Bestwall Gypsum Company constructed a plant located at 13550 Bloomingdale Road in Akron, New York. CertainTeed Corporation, a manufacturer of building products, including drywall and joint compound, acquired Akron’s Bestwall facility in 1952; and, in 1956, Bestwall Gypsum Company spun off as an independent company thereby reestablishing its Akron, New York plant. In 1965, Georgia-Pacific acquired Bestwall and took over its Akron plant and product line, which included gypsum board or drywall, plaster and fertilizers. Georgia-Pacific expanded its product line to include a variety of joint compounds and wall textures. Up until the mid to late 1970’s these products contained asbestos, including dry and ready-mix joint compound (mud), bedding compound and texture. Georgia-Pacific’s Akron, New York plant distributed its goods to the Northeastern United States. The plant closed in 1974, and the facility has been repurposed for a variety of commercial industries.

Up until the mid to late 1970s Georgia-Pacific incorporated asbestos into its joint compound and wall textures. Drywall finishers, construction workers and homeowners who erected drywall or performed home renovations may have come into contact with these asbestos containing building materials. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Joint compound, a plaster-like substance used to seal the joints between two sheets of drywall, came in two basic forms: a dry mixture, to which water would have to be added, as well as a wet, ready-mixed product. Asbestos was used in joint compound to strengthen the mixture and to make it thicker. It was also used to prevent cracking once the compound dried. Contractors and laborers were exposed to asbestos, through the application and clean-up processes of joint compound. Even those who worked in an area where asbestos-containing joint compound was mixed, sanded or swept-up are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In 1977, the Consumer Product Safety Commission banned the use of asbestos in joint compound. However, the asbestos ban did not affect products already on the market, so it was possible that joint compound (mud) containing asbestos was used even after the 1977 ban.

Individuals who perform home renovations need to be weary of exposure to asbestos during demolition. If left undisturbed, asbestos is generally not dangerous. However, when home or building renovations take place, asbestos dust and fibers can become airborne, allowing them to be inhaled or ingested. Even though asbestos was removed from Georgia-Pacific’s products by 1977, it is important to remember that many homes and buildings constructed prior to 1980 still contain the asbestos products in their walls.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, as a result of working at Georgia Pacific’s Akron, New York plant; in the construction field; or completing home renovations, we urge you to contact us today regarding your legal rights.

Georgia-Pacific Plattsburgh, New York Plant

In 1963, Georgia-Pacific acquired the former Vanity Fair Paper Mill on Margaret Street in Plattsburgh, New York. The mill was originally purposed as a factory for the Lozier Motor Company in the early 1900s. The Plattsburgh, New York mill consists of numerous buildings, including a steam plant, pump house, filter plant and paper mill. Georgia-Pacific’s Plattsburgh facility continues to manufacture consumer paper products, including Angel Soft toilet paper and Sparkle towels and napkins.

Prior to the mid to late 1970s, the boilers and associated steam and water pipes at Georgia Pacific’s Plattsburgh plant were covered with asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material were also utilized within pumps and flanges that were associated with steam and chemical systems. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation lined pipes, pumps, valves and boilers associated with the steam and water systems at Georgia-Pacific’s Plattsburgh plant. Steam was used to run turbines and to run equipment in the paper mill. In order to do so, boilers required consistent pressure to deliver the steam to each piece of equipment it powered. Due to wear and tear, asbestos insulation materials were commonly removed and reapplied so that the equipment associated with the steam system could maintain a constant internal temperature. When asbestos-containing insulation was removed and reapplied, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets ensured a tight seal between flanges, pumps and valves, which were also utilized throughout steam, water and chemical lines. Asbestos-containing packing material was wrapped around pump shafts and valve stems in order to prevent fluid leaks. Gaskets and packing material were often replaced during maintenance on pumps and valves; the replacement process emitted asbestos dust, which workers inhaled.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at a Georgia-Pacific facility and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

The Robert E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant is an electrical generating facility located on the shores of Lake Ontario near Ontario, New York. Operating since 1970, the Ginna plant is one of the oldest nuclear power plants that is still in operation in the United States. Ginna is one of the smallest nuclear plants in the country, producing 581 megawatts of electricity. The reactor plant at Ginna is a single Westinghouse two-loop pressurized water reactor. In 1996, two Babcock & Wilcox steam generators replaced the previous Westinghouse units. Rochester Gas & Electric owned and operated Ginna until 2004, when Constellation Energy Group acquired the plant.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used in the construction, maintenance and upkeep of the Ginna plant, including pipe covering, block insulation, insulating cement and gaskets. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to water and steam pipes throughout the Ginna plant. Asbestos block insulation covered the turbine. Handling, cutting or disturbing pipe covering or block insulation emitted asbestos dust into the air. A layer of asbestos containing insulating cement was also applied to the turbine, on top of the block insulation, in order to protect the block insulation from damage. The asbestos-containing cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the dry powder released asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were used in pumps, steam lines and other equipment. Asbestos was incorporated into gaskets because of its resistance to high temperatures and pressure. Workers at Ginna utilized prefabricated gaskets and created gaskets from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Cutting gasket material emitted asbestos dust into the air. When a gasket was replaced, it was scraped off the flange. Scraping or cutting gaskets released asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at the Robert E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Globe Woven Belting Company

In 1916, the Globe Woven Belting Company was established in Buffalo, New York, by Michael Bleecher as a manufacturer of high quality conveyor belt products. Initially, the company’s plant consisted of one building located at 1400 Clinton Street. Over the next few decades and as its operations grew, the facility expanded and added more wings to its initial structure. In 1965, Albany Felt, also known today as Albany International, acquired Globe Belting and continued to operate the facility as a wholly-owned subsidiary. Albany International continued to manufacturer conveyor belt products at the Clinton Street facility, which at that time, covered over 7 acres. In 1983, former Albany International – Globe Belting Vice Presidents, Donald S. Stewart and Harry M. Cardillo, acquired Globe Belting renaming the company Globe International. In 1997, Habasit AG purchased Globe and renamed the company Habasit Globe, Inc, which today maintains its operations at the Clinton Street facility.

Up until the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized at Globe Belting in the manufacturing process and during maintenance procedures. Asbestos yarn, block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, and gaskets contained asbestos. Asbestos was also incorporated into many conveyor belts that Globe Belting manufactured. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing materials and products were not absent from Globe Belting’s product line or its manufacturing facility. Up until the late 1970s, numerous trades, including weavers, loom setters, belt flippers, machinists and other laborers were exposed to asbestos during the manufacture of conveyor belts and other woven materials. These tradesmen were exposed to asbestos dust and fibers when they wove, cut or manipulated asbestos yarn. Inhaling dust and particles from the manipulation of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases.

Asbestos-containing materials also insulated the steam system at Globe Belting. Asbestos was incorporated into insulation that covered hot water pipes and associated equipment within the building’s steam heat system. Asbestos block insulation was applied to steam boilers and hot water tanks. When asbestos-containing insulation was handled or disturbed, it released asbestos fibers into the air and into the breathing zone of workers.

 

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, has represented former Globe Belting workers who were diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at Globe Belting, in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

GM Central Foundry

General Motor’s Central Foundry Division, now a part of GM Powertrain, was founded in 1917, in Saginaw, Michigan, by sixteen men as the Saginaw Malleable Iron Company. Foundries melt iron ore, steel and other ingredients in order to create various parts used to make cars, specifically car engines. Two years after it was established, the company was sold to GM, and expanded to three plants, including the original Saginaw plant, Grey Iron Foundry in Tonawanda, New York, and Saginaw Steering Geer. In 1946, under the Central Foundry Division, GM combined these plants and several others throughout the United States. At its peak in 1967, the Central Foundry Division was the largest foundry organization in the world, employing over 11,000 workers.

Prior to federal regulations imposed in the 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were applied to hot surfaces in many foundries, such as the Tonawanda site, because of its fire resistant and insulating qualities. At the Tonawanda plant, cupolas (or furnaces) were used to melt and pour metal to create castings and parts. Asbestos insulation covered the pipes and ducts associated with these furnaces.

The Tonawanda plant’s boiler house contained several large industrial boilers. Asbestos insulation covered parts of the boilers and many of the associated piping, valves and pumps inside the boiler house. Asbestos-containing insulation materials located in the foundry and boiler house were repaired and replaced on a regular basis by outside insulation contractors. Old insulation was torn off, and new insulation was cut to fit the piping and contours of the boilers. GM workers, as well as outside contractors, including iron workers, insulators, boilermakers, sheet metal workers, electricians and those who worked in the foundry itself or boiler house may have been exposed to high levels of asbestos dust, a major risk factor for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis and other asbestos-related diseases.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, represents former workers and retirees from the GM Central Foundry a.k.a GM Powertrain. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered extensive knowledge concerning aspects of the asbestos containing products to which these workers were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at the GM Central Foundry in Tonawanda, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Goodyear Tire & Rubber

 In 1947, the Pathfinder Chemical Company, a subsidiary of Goodyear Tire & Rubber, constructed a chemical plant at the corner of 56th Street and Baker Avenue in Niagara Falls, New York. The plant consisted of ten buildings on twenty-three acres of land, and it manufactured vinyl resins and chemical additives used in the production of synthetic rubber for automotive tires. In 1957, Pathfinder Chemical was renamed the Goodyear Chemical Division. During its peak production years in the early 1990s, the Goodyear plant employed over 300 workers. Due to the closure of the vinyl manufacturing department and decreased demand for its products, the plant workforce decreased to fewer than one hundred.

Up until the late 1970s, workers at Goodyear Tire & Rubber were exposed to asbestos-containing materials used during maintenance and repairs on production equipment, boilers and steam pipes. Block insulation, pipe covering, gaskets and insulating cement contained asbestos. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, or those who worked in the vicinity of where these materials were utilized are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was utilized at Goodyear in order to heat plant buildings and to run equipment throughout the plant. A network of pipes delivered steam to radiators and production equipment. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation associated with the steam system at Goodyear’s Niagara Falls plant covered boilers, pipes and valves. During maintenance and repair procedures on the steam system, workers removed asbestos-containing insulation in order to access equipment. After the procedure was completed, new insulation was applied. Removing, applying or handling asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

In order to ensure a tight seal between pipe flanges and equipment within the steam system, asbestos-containing gaskets were utilized in boilers, pumps and valves. Gaskets were frequently removed and replaced during maintenance procedures. Workers fabricated new gaskets from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material, or they used prefabricated gaskets. When workers scraped or fabricated gaskets, asbestos fibers became airborne. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at the Goodyear Tire & Rubber plant in Niagara Falls, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Goudey Power Station

The Goudey Power Station in Johnson City, New York, was constructed in 1917 by the New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) as the Westover Power Station. Following an expansion to the facility in 1950, the plant was renamed for former NYSEG Vice President William B. Goudey. During its operation, the Goudey Power Station consisted of three coalfired boilers, which provided steam to two turbine generators with a generating capacity of 119 megawatts. In 1999, AES Corporation purchased Goudey Station along with five other NYSEG generating facilities, and the plant was renamed AES Westover. The Goudey Power Station closed in 2011, due to high operating costs and competition from cheaper sources of electricity, such as natural gas and hydroelectric plants.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of insulation materials that were applied to equipment associated with the steam system at Goudey Station. Workers removed and applied asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, packing material and gaskets. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Goudey Station consisted of three coal-fired boilers, which produced steam in order to turn its two turbine generators to produce electricity. A network of asbestos-covered pipes delivered steam to the turbines. Pumps, steam traps and valves also contained asbestos gaskets, cement and packing materials. Workers removed asbestos-containing insulation during maintenance procedures on the steam system, and they applied new insulation after maintenance and repairs were completed. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Goudey Station occasionally went into a “shutdown” maintenance period. During a shutdown, workers performed maintenance on boilers, turbines, valves, pumps and pipes. Insulation contractors or laborers sawed and scraped worn asbestos insulation from steam pipes and equipment. Asbestos-containing gaskets were also scraped from flanges, and new gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. These processes emitted large amounts of asbestos dust. Asbestos dust was also released into work areas of employees who did not participate in shutdowns or have direct contact with asbestos-containing materials.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Goudey Power Station or at another NYSEG facility and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Goulds Pumps

In 1848, Seabury S. Gould purchased the interests of Edward Mynderse and H.C. Silsby in Downs, Mynderse & Co., and the firm became Downs & Co, which was a manufacturer of wooden pumps. In 1849, during the first year of the Gold Rush, Mr. Gould cast his first all-iron pump. He believed that his pumps would eventually provide fresh flowing water for the pioneers who were opening the West; assist farmers in irrigating farms in the East; and deliver water to the vast plantations in the South. In Seneca Falls, New York, in 1869, Mr. Gould incorporated his company as Goulds Manufacturing Company.

Goulds manufactured a variety of iron products, including church bells, tools and corn shellers; but, it quickly became known for its innovative iron pumps. In 1926, and under the leadership of Seabury Gould’s grandson, Norman J. Gould, the company’s name changed to Goulds Pumps, Inc. Norman J. Gould guided the company through periods of vast changes in technology and industrial job sites. Throughout the twentieth century, Goulds manufactured pumps for a variety of industries, including chemical, pulp and paper, mining, mineral processing, oil and gas, power, water and wastewater. Goulds Pumps was managed and operated by the Gould family until 1964, when control of the company shifted to public stockholders. Goulds Pumps was acquired in 1997 by ITT Industries, Inc., a global diversified manufacturing company based in White Plains, New York. With offices, manufacturing facilities and warehouses worldwide, Goulds Pumps continues to operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of ITT Industries fluid technology segment. Today, Goulds Pumps headquarters remain in Seneca Falls, New York, and it employs over 5,000 people.

Pumps designed by Goulds are used in a variety of applications and must be designed to withstand high temperatures and corrosive chemicals. Industrial sites, such as Hooker Chemical, Durez Plastics, Bethlehem Steel, Ashland Oil, Carborundum and Union Carbide utilized Goulds pumps in the manufacturing process of a variety of products. Up until the late 1970s, asbestos could be found in gaskets, packing materials and valves contained within Goulds pumps. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer, years after an initial exposure to airborne asbestos fibers.

Asbestos gaskets were primarily used in pumps because of their durability and ability to withstand high temperatures and corrosive materials, such as sulfuric acid. Gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. The process of cutting or removing asbestos-containing gasket materials emitted asbestos dust into the air, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing packing materials were also installed in pumps manufactured by Goulds. Asbestos-containing packing materials prevented hot water or dangerous chemicals from leaking. When Goulds pumps were put into operation, packing materials were removed and replaced on a regular basis. Workers removed packing materials with a tool called a packing puller. When the worn packing was removed, new packing was cut to fit the diameter of the stem or shaft. Removing and installing packing materials also emitted asbestos containing dust and fibers. Workers who assisted in the manufacturing process of Goulds pumps, or workers, such as plumbers and steamfitters, who were responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of Goulds pumps are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Beginning in the 1940s, Goulds Pumps were installed on numerous United States Naval vessels. Plumbers, steamfitters, boilermakers, insulators and other marine staff who were involved in the maintenance and repair of Goulds pumps on Naval vessels were at risk for exposure to asbestos-containing materials.

Dozens of asbestos-containing materials, such as refractory materials and insulating cement, were also utilized in the facilities where Goulds pumps were manufactured. Asbestos-containing refractory materials lined the interior of ladles and furnaces used in the manufacturing process of pumps. A refractory material is a non-metallic insulation that is resistant to high temperatures. It was common for furnace men and other tradesmen to mix the dry asbestos-containing insulation with water and apply it to the inside of furnaces. Pouring and mixing refractory materials caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Plumbing and steam lines, valves and pumps at Goulds Pumps plants were also covered in asbestos-containing insulation. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed the insulation in order to access the equipment associated with plumbing systems. When maintenance or repair procedures were completed, new asbestos-containing insulation was applied. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked for Goulds Pumps, Inc., or installed, maintained or repaired pumps manufactured by Goulds and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Gouverneur Talc

In 1948, the Gouverneur Talc Company began mining and milling talc near Balmat, New York. A subsidiary of R. T. Vanderbilt, Gouverneur Talc produced talc for various industrial uses, including the manufacture of paint, ceramics and plastic molding compound. In 1974, the mines and mills of the International Talc Company were acquired by Gouverneur Talc. These facilities were adjacent to the Gouverneur Talc mine. In 2008, Gouverneur Talc ceased talc production at its Balmat facilities.

Scientists have correlated exposure to talc mined in the Gouverneur area of Northern New York with instances of mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases among the talc miners.1    Naturally-occurring  asbestos  formations  exist  throughout  talc  deposits  in  this region. Jefferson County, which is just south of the area where the mines were located and where many of the miners lived, has continually had one of the highest mortality rates for mesothelioma in the United States over the past fifty years. 2 Males in this community had the sixth highest mesothelioma mortality rate in the nation during a period in time when the Balmat mines were extremely active (1968-1981). The mesothelioma mortality rate for women during this time period was the second highest in the nation. Since the early 1980’s, the mesothelioma rate has increased to the point that it is now five to ten times the background rate. 3 Talc mine workers, outside contractors and residents of Jefferson and St. Lawrence Counties are at risk of developing mesothelioma, lung cancer or other lung ailments related to talc exposure from the Balmat mines.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos insulation covered boilers, pipes and associated equipment throughout the Gouverneur Talc facility. Due to wear and tear, laborers removed and reapplied asbestos-containing materials. When workers handled asbestos-containing insulation, asbestos dust and fibers were released into the air and into the breathing zones of anyone in the vicinity. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without masks or protective gear. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Exposure to dust resulting from talc mining and milling put many miners and their families at risk for mesothelioma and lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked, lived or played near the Balmat mines and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Gowanda State Hospital (Gowanda Psychiatric Center)

Gowanda State Hospital (Gowanda Psychiatric Center) was located in Collins, New York. The land was originally owned by Quakers, but in 1894, the State of New York took title to 500 acres of the property for construction of a State hospital for the insane. The first building, which is still in use by the Collins Correctional Facility, was completed in 1898. As the hospital grew, nearly 100 more buildings were constructed as the institution’s population quickly rose to over 4,000 psychiatric patients. Numerous buildings were constructed throughout the 20th  Century, including patient buildings, a power house, outlying shops, and staff houses. By the late 1950’s Gowanda and other state-run psychiatric hospitals housed nearly 100,000 mentally ill New Yorkers. During the 1970s and as antipsychotic drugs were developed, some of the institutionalized patients were released and transitioned into half-way houses so that they could be reintroduced into society. As the deinstitutionalization of psychiatric patients took place, the prison system experienced a drastic increase in prisoners due to new State drug laws. State officials were desperate for space and began to look at underutilized State properties to transition into prisons. In 1982, the State converted forty percent of the Gowanda State Hospital into the Collins Correctional Institution, a medium security prison. In 1994, the State opened the Gowanda Correctional Facility, which is located on the hospital grounds and adjacent to the Collins Correctional Institution. The prisons are separated by a fence and are administered as separate entities that share only heat, water, and power from the old Gowanda State Hospital power plant.

As demand for Gowanda State Hospital’s services increased, the hospital completed numerous expansions and renovations. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used in the construction and maintenance of the Gowanda State Hospital. Pipe covering, insulating cement, gaskets, packing material and vinyl floor tiles contained asbestos. Workers who handled these materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement lined pipes, pumps, valves and steam traps associated with the steam and water systems at Gowanda State Hospital. Asbestos-containing pipe covering also lined the steam supply, steam return, hot water supply and hot water return. Due to wear and tear, asbestos insulation materials were commonly removed and reapplied so that the equipment associated with the steam system could maintain a constant internal temperature. When asbestos-containing insulation was removed and reapplied, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Steam traps, steam valves, and steam strainers also contained asbestos gaskets and asbestos packing at Gowanda State Hospital. On a weekly basis steamfitters and/or plumbers replaced asbestos gaskets and packing material. During the gasket replacement process, it was often necessary for steamfitters or plumbers to scrape an old gasket from its flange. Power grinders and wire brushes were frequently required to remove worn gaskets. The action of scraping and grinding worn gaskets created asbestos dust, which was inhaled by pipe workers.

If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with construction or maintenance projects at the Gowanda State Hospital (Gowanda Psychiatric Center) in Collins, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Great Lakes Plastics Co., Inc.

GREAT LAKES PLASTIC COMPANY was founded in 1946, and was located in Buffalo, New York.

Great Lakes was a Manufacturing plant that made different types of plastic molded products for various industries.

During the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, some of the molding compounds that Great Lakes used to make their plastic molded products contained asbestos.

The companies that manufactured and supplied asbestos containing molding compounds to Great Lakes knew about the health hazards of asbestos but they did not warn Great Lakes Plastic Co. or its employees of these health hazards.

Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Molders, finishers and other laborers at Great Lakes Plastic Co. were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process not knowing it could harm them.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos containing plastic molding compounds but who worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a family member ever worked at Great Lakes Plastics Co. at any time during either the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1970’s and have contracted mesothelioma or lung cancer, please con- tact the attorneys at Lipsitz & Ponterio, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos related injuries.

Greenidge (Dresden) Power Plant

The Greenidge Power Plant in Dresden, New York, was built in 1937 by the New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG). Since 1999, the plant has been owned and operated by AES Corporation. At one time, the Greenidge Power consisted of six coal-fired boilers, which provided steam to power four turbine generators. The plant had a generating capacity of over 200 megawatts. In 1985, two turbine generators and three boilers were taken out of service. In 2009, another turbine and boiler were also taken out of service. Citing high fuel costs and decreased demand for electricity, AES shut down the Greenidge Power Plant in March 2011, with the intent to reopen it when conditions in the electricity market improved.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized at Greenidge Power Plant as a component in dozens of materials, including pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Greenidge Power Plant utilized coal-fired boilers in order to produce steam. The steam was delivered through pipes to turbine generators, which produced electrical power. In order to minimize heat loss, boilers, generators, pipes and other equipment housed within the steam system were covered in asbestos-containing insulating materials. During repairs on the steam system, workers removed the insulation in order to access necessary equipment. When the repair procedure was completed, new asbestos-containing insulation was applied. Removing and applying insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne.

The Greenidge Power Plant periodically went into a “shutdown” maintenance period. During a shutdown, maintenance work was performed on equipment in the steam system. Worn asbestos insulation was replaced with new insulation. This process was extremely messy and created large dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they carried on their work without wearing protective masks or clothing.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at the Greenidge Power Plant, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

GTE Sylvania

GTE Sylvania was an electronic equipment manufacturing company located in Seneca Falls, New York. Although the

manufacturing plant changed ownership, it is most commonly known as the manufacturing plant for GTE Sylvania. Following GTE’s sale to Philips in 1980, the plant expanded to manufacturing lighting devices, vacuum tubes and electronic devices. Through the Seneca Falls manufacturing complex the company continued to employ over 2,000 workers through 1986 when the company shut down the Seneca Falls plant.

As an electronics manufacturing company, GTE Sylvania was contracted by other businesses to create electrical components for many commonly used household items. Many of the electronic components manufactured by GTE Sylvania at the Seneca Falls Plant used asbestos-containing products and were distributed to companies around the country including many local manufacturing companies.

The GTE Sylvania complex, originally built by the Rumsey Pump company, was made up of several interconnected buildings. The company primarily used the buildings for production, storage and shipping. Unfortunately, asbestos was incorporated into the materials and equipment used by workers at the GTE Sylvania plant. Employees were exposed to asbestos during the heating processes, forming, molding, and fitting of the components of the various devices manufactured at the plant.

Employees at GTE Sylvania may have been exposed to asbestos products during their years of work at the GTE Sylvania plant. Asbestos materials and insulation were used throughout the plant. During plant maintenance and repair procedure processes, asbestos-containing dust was released into the air, exposing workers to asbestos dust via inhalation.

Inhaling dust and airborne particles from asbestos put workers at risk of developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. GTE Sylvania workers were not warned of the hazards of exposure to asbestos when they performed their job duties and were not advised to wear masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with raw asbestos materials may be at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease.

Since 1995, our attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have conducted research, extensive document discovery, and obtained deposition testimony to seek justice for workers exposed to asbestos. If you or a loved one worked at GTE Sylvania and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Hanna Furnace

The Hanna Furnace facility in Buffalo, New York, processed iron ore into pig iron, a primary ingredient in the steel making process. This site was constructed in 1903 by the Buffalo Union Steel Company, at the southern border of Buffalo on swampy land bordering Lake Erie. Soon after the facility began operations, the Union Ship Canal was dug to facilitate the transfer of materials to and from the numerous Great Lakes freighters operating between Buffalo and ports in the Midwestern United States. Hanna Furnace Company, a subsidiary of M.A. Hanna Company, purchased the operation in 1915.

Just weeks after the beginning of the Great Depression in 1929, several businesses involved in steel production merged their assets to form National Steel Corporation. M.A. Hanna transferred Hanna Furnace to National Steel, in exchange for stock in that company. The nearby Donner-Hanna Coke plant, also a subsidiary of M.A. Hanna, was transferred to National Steel at that time. Hanna Furnace Corporation, as it became known after the merger, operated at the site until the company closed in 1982. In the following years, the facility was partially demolished by a series of owners, and was left covered in debris.

The City of Buffalo became owner of the property through bankruptcy proceedings in 2001. In recent years, the Buffalo Urban Development Corporation has assumed ownership. The BUDC completed demolition of the remaining structures and removed all the remaining debris. The property is now known as the Buffalo Lakeside Commerce Park and is home to several businesses.

Asbestos was incorporated into many different materials used at Hanna Furnace, such as pipe covering, block insulation, gaskets, and refractory mortar. Employees and contractors at the Hanna Furnace facility were at risk for asbestos exposure. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other diseases.

Refractory mortar used in lining the blast furnaces, stoves, ladles, and runners at Hanna Furnace contained asbestos because of the mineral’s resistance to fire and high temperatures. Frequently, these linings needed to be repaired or rebuilt. The materials they were constructed of degraded over time, due to the extreme temperatures involved. Workers broke apart the firebrick and mortar, which caused asbestos fibers to become airborne.

The lining was then rebuilt with new firebricks and mortar. Refractory mortar was manufactured as a dry powder, and was mixed with water in order to be applied. Asbestos shorts, a raw asbestos fiber that came in bags, were often added to the mortar during the mixing process for increased strength and durability. Pouring and mixing the dry powder caused clouds of asbestos-containing dust to become airborne. The refractory mortar was applied using a machine which sprayed the mixture through a hose. Workers in the vicinity were likely exposed to asbestos.

Asbestos was also used in the upkeep and maintenance of the facility. Water and steam pipes were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering. Boilers were covered in asbestos block insulation. Irregular surfaces and gaps in the insulation on pipes and boilers were covered in asbestos-containing insulating cement. Steam lines, pumps, and other plant machinery used asbestos rope and gaskets fortified with asbestos.

Installing, removing, handling or disturbing any of these materials would cause asbestos fibers and dust to become suspended in the air. Once asbestos became airborne, it remained in the air for quite some time. After the asbestos dust settled, the movements of workers in the area stirred the dust back into the air, which placed even more workers at risk for asbestos exposure.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former workers and retirees from Hanna Furnace in Buffalo, New York. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. This information allows us to assist our clients in bringing claims against the companies that manufactured and distributed these harmful products. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Hanna Furnace facility and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Harriman State Office Building Campus

The W. Averell Harriman State Office Building Campus was constructed during the 1950s and 1960s in order to provide office space for various departments of the New York State government. Located between Washington and Western Avenues in Albany, New York, the State Campus consists of fifteen buildings on 330 acres of land, and it hosts several state agencies, including the New York State Police Academy, State Police Headquarters, State Emergency Management Office, Department of Labor and Department of Correctional Services.

In recent years, the New York State government has moved some state offices out of the State Campus and into downtown Albany. Some vacant buildings were demolished, while others were taken over by private companies. Currently, around 7,000 state employees work at the State Campus.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing joint compound, fireproof insulation, block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, packing material and gaskets were used in maintenance procedures at the Harriman State Office Building Campus. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel of the buildings at the Harriman State Office Building campus in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Fireproofing was packaged in heavy paper bags, and it contained a dry mixture of asbestos, cement and linen. Fireproofing material was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel using a hose.

Mixing and spraying fireproof insulation emitted clouds of asbestos dust and fibers into the air. Pipefitters and electricians typically disturbed the fireproofing after it was applied in order to install pipes or conduits. When fireproofing material was disturbed, asbestos dust was emitted, which workers inhaled.

Drywall finishers also utilized asbestos-containing joint compound at the State Campus in order to fill seams between sheets of drywall. Joint compound “mud” was manufactured as a dry mix or ready-mix. After the mud was applied to a wall’s surface and dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface, which caused asbestos dust to become airborne.

Steam was used to heat the buildings at the State Campus. The Campus Power Plant in Building 17 provided steam heat to all the buildings throughout the State Campus. Boilers, pipes, valves and pumps within the steam system were covered with asbestos-containing insulation.

During maintenance procedures, workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment within the system. New asbestos insulation was applied after the maintenance or repairs took place. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were used in pipe systems at the Harriman State Office Building Campus to ensure a proper seal between pipe flanges, valves or pumps. Gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. When a gasket was replaced, it was scraped off its flange. Cutting and removing gaskets released asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

Workers also utilized asbestos-containing packing material to prevent leaks from pump shafts and valve stems. Packing material was commonly removed from pump and valve glands using a tool called a packing puller. Workers cut and manipulated new packing material to fit the diameter of the stem or shaft. Removing and installing packing material emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of the Harriman State Office Building Campus were employed by various contractors throughout the Capital District. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the Harriman State Office Building Campus in Albany, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Harrison Radiator

Harrison Radiator was established in 1910 by Herbert Harrison in Lockport, New York. During its first years of operation, the company was located in a small building on Canal Street. In 1914, Harrison Radiator moved to a facility on Washburn Street that consisted of five buildings, which became known as the Main Plant. The company was acquired by United Motors in 1916, and in 1918, General Motors purchased both United Motors and Harrison Radiator. In 1952, Harrison Radiator constructed a 350-acre, 10-building manufacturing facility on Upper Mountain Road called the West Plant.

Harrison Radiator manufactured automotive radiators and air conditioners at both facilities for General Motors. During its peak production years, the company employed more than 10,000 workers at its Lockport facilities. In 1987, Harrison Radiator closed its Washburn Street plant. In 1995, General Motors spun off all its component manufacturers into a new company named Delphi Automotive Systems, and Harrison Radiator was renamed Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems. Harrison Radiator was reacquired by General Motors in 2009 as part of its Automotive Components Group, and its plant on Upper Mountain Road continues to manufacture automotive heating and cooling components. The buildings of the former Main Plant are now utilized as an office park known as Harrison Place.

Asbestos was incorporated into numerous materials used during the manufacturing process at Harrison Radiator. Up until the late 1970s, insulating materials, such as block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, gaskets and packing material contained asbestos. Employees and contractors who worked at Harrison Radiator were at risk for asbestos exposure. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement lined boilers, pipes, pumps and valves associated with the steam system at Harrison Radiator. Due to wear and tear, asbestos insulation was removed and reapplied so that the equipment within the steam system could maintain a constant internal temperature. When asbestos-containing insulation was removed and reapplied, asbestos dust became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized throughout the Harrison Radiator plants. These gaskets created a tight seal between pipe flanges, pumps and valves. Asbestos containing packing material was wrapped around valve stems and pump shafts in order to prevent fluid leaks. Asbestos gaskets and packing material were often replaced during maintenance and repairs on pumps and valves. The replacement process emitted asbestos fibers, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Harrison Radiator in Lockport, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Heat & Frost Insulators Local 4 Buffalo

Local 4 of the International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers is a labor union that represents insulators in Western New York and Northwestern Pennsylvania. Headquartered in Buffalo, New York, Local 4 was one of the original local unions that comprised the international union chartered by the American Federation of Labor (AFL) in 1910, along with locals from New York, Chicago, Saint Louis, Detroit, Cleveland and Pittsburgh. The union is affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). Until 2007, the insulators’ union was known as the International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers.

Members of the Buffalo local have jurisdiction over insulating work occurring in Erie, Niagara, Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, Wyoming, Genesee and Orleans Counties in New York; and Warren, McKean and Potter Counties in Pennsylvania. Insulating work occurs in commercial and industrial locations, as well as in construction sites. Local 4 insulators have worked at nearly every major construction site and industrial location in Western New York, including Ashland Oil, Bethlehem Steel, Hooker Chemical, Donner Hanna Coke and Durez Plastics. Some of the major contractors who have employed insulators from Local 4 include Frontier Insulation, Niagara Insulation and Buffalo Insulation Distributors.

Local 4 insulators apply thermal insulation to any equipment or apparatus that requires a controlled internal temperature. Up until the early 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into insulating materials utilized by Local 4 insulators, including pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Many members of Local 4 have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases as a result of their exposure to asbestos while working as insulators.

A large construction project or industrial site, such as Marine Midland Center or DuPont, contained miles of steam and hot water pipes, which were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering. Simply handling pipe covering caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne. Insulators often had to cut asbestos-containing pipe covering with a saw or knife in order to fit irregular lengths of pipe. When insulators cut pipe covering, asbestos dust was emitted into the air, which the insulators inhaled. At power houses and other industrial sites, Local 4 insulators took part in a periodic maintenance procedure called a “shutdown”. During a shutdown, insulators removed old, worn insulation and replaced it with new insulation.

Clouds of asbestos-containing dust were created while removing and applying pipe covering during shutdowns.

Asbestos-containing insulating cement was applied to irregularly-shaped equipment, including pumps and valves. It was also occasionally used in order to cover block insulation on boilers and other high-temperature applications. Insulating cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was typically shipped to a job site in a heavy paper bag. In order to prepare insulating cement for application, insulators poured the dry powder into a pail or tub and mixed it with water. Pouring and mixing insulating cement caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

Steam boilers in nearly every large building or work site were often insulated with asbestos containing block insulation. Kettles, tanks and vessels at chemical plants were also covered with block insulation. Local 4 insulators cut and shaped block insulation with saws and knives in order to fit it to the contours of the equipment. When asbestos-containing block insulation was handled or cut, asbestos fibers were emitted.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by members of the International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers Local 4. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed as an insulator for Local 4 and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Hercules/Ciba Geigy Plant

The former Ciba Geigy Main Plant was located to the east of Glens Falls within the Town of Queensbury, New York on a 45-acre site. Starting in 1901, the facility was used by the American Wallpaper Company, Imperial Color Works, and Underwood Paper Mills for manufacturing wallpaper and later expanding to producing inorganic pigments. Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, Imperial Color Works became the leading manufacturer of colored pigments in the United States.

In 1960 Imperial was acquired by Hercules Powder who at the time was one of the largest chemical manufacturers in the country. Hercules Pigment later became a division of Swiss chemicals giant, Ciba-Geigy in 1979. Ciba-Geigy continued to produce pigments until February of 1989 when the onsite buildings were demolished leaving 530 employees without work. Although on-site manufacturing came to a stop, significant ground pollution remains.

Asbestos was used in the Hercules Ciba-Geigy plant for its heat and flame-resistant qualities exposing employees to asbestos while working and maintaining the building. Manufacturing areas were heated by steam blast heaters, powered by steam generated by boilers. The components of the heating systems (i.e., pipes, pumps, and valves) contained asbestos gaskets and packing. Frequent removal and replacement of asbestos parts took place due to the high heat of these systems. Employees throughout the complex were exposed to asbestos, putting them at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma or lung cancer, later in life.

Workers at the Hercules/Ciba Geigy Plant were not warned about the hazards of exposure to asbestos when they performed their job duties without wearing masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos still remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at the Hercules/Ciba Geigy Plant and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Hewitt Robins (Litton Industries)

In 1892, Thomas Robins, Jr., invented a heavy-duty conveyor belt for carrying coal and ore, and in 1896, he founded the Robins Conveying Belt Company. The company later became known as Hewitt-Robins Inc., which was formed through a merger of the Robins Conveying Belt Company and the Hewitt Rubber Corporation of Buffalo. Hewitt-Robins manufactured conveyor belting and machinery, industrial hoses, power transmission machinery, foam rubber and other molded rubber products.

The company also designed, engineered and erected complete belt conveyor systems. Hewitt-Robins operated plants in the East and throughout the Midwest, and its largest plant, the Rubber Division plant, located at 240 Kensington Avenue in Buffalo, New York, employed approximately 750 people during its peak years. In 1964, Hewitt-Robins and Litton Industries announced a merger between the two companies. By July 1974, Hewitt-Robins closed its Buffalo plant and announced that it would liquidate its assets after several failed attempts to sell the Buffalo facility.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the manufacturing process and in maintenance procedures at Hewitt-Robins (Litton Industries) in Buffalo, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at Hewitt-Robins in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Hickling Power Station

In 1948, New York State Electric & Gas (NYSEG) constructed the Hickling Power Station. The power station was constructed during a period of rapid expansion for NYSEG, which doubled the company’s electrical output capacity. Located in Corning, New York, Hickling Station was named for former NYSEG vice president William G. Hickling. The power generation equipment at the power station consisted of four boilers that provided steam to two turbine generators, with a maximum output of 85 megawatts. In 1999, AES Corporation purchased Hickling Station, and in 2000, the plant was permanently closed.

Up until the late 1970s, workers at Hickling Station applied and removed asbestos-containing materials during maintenance procedures. Pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and gaskets contained asbestos. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, or those who worked in the vicinity of where these materials were used, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Hickling Station utilized coal-fired boilers and turbine generators in order to generate electricity. The boilers produced steam, which was delivered to the turbine generators through a network of pipes, valves and pumps. In order to increase the efficiency of the steam system, equipment within the system was covered with asbestos-containing insulation. During repairs on the steam system, workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access necessary equipment. When repair procedures were completed, new asbestos-containing insulation was applied. Removing and applying insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne.

Roughly once a year, Hickling Station went into a maintenance period called a “shutdown.” During a shutdown, workers performed maintenance on boilers, turbines, pumps and pipes. Worn asbestos insulation was removed from equipment within the steam system and replaced with new insulation. This process was extremely messy and created large dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they carried on their work without wearing protective masks or clothing.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at the Hickling Power Station in Corning, New York, or another NYSEG facility, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Hobart and William Smith Colleges, collectively known as the Colleges of the Seneca, are private, liberal arts colleges located in Geneva, New York. Founded in 1822, Hobart College admitted only men. In 1906, William Smith College was founded at the same location as a college for women.

Over time, the colleges began to operate collectively, with students from both colleges attending the same classes and sharing a commencement ceremony. The campus of Hobart and William Smith consists of sixty buildings on 195 acres of land situated on the shore of Seneca Lake. With a combined enrollment of 2,100 students, the colleges offer bachelor’s degrees in over forty majors, as well as master’s degrees in teaching.

In recent years, laborers who assisted in the construction and maintenance of the buildings at Hobart and William Smith colleges have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement were utilized in the maintenance of steam pipes at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Asbestos was incorporated into pipe covering materials because of its durability and resistance to heat. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

The Hobart and William Smith campus was heated by steam pipes that ran throughout the campus. Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to pipes in order to maintain steady temperatures within the pipes and to protect the pipes against damage. Irregularly shaped equipment in the steam system, such as valves or pumps, were covered by asbestos insulating cement. When maintenance or repairs were performed on the steam system, pipe covering and insulating cement were removed in order to access to the equipment. After this process was completed, new insulation was applied to the pipes. Removing and applying pipe covering and insulating cement caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at Hobart and William Smith Colleges were employed by various contractors throughout Central and Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Hobart and William Smith Colleges and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Hooker Chemical

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, represents numerous former and retired laborers who were employed at the Hooker Electrochemical Company (Hooker Chemical or Hooker Niagara) located in Niagara Falls, NY. In recent years, former employees of Hooker Chemical have developed and died of mesothelioma, various cancers, and other chemical and asbestos-related diseases. Hooker Chemical’s Niagara Falls, New York, plant was located on a 115 acre site on Buffalo Avenue. Hooker Chemical was once one of the nation’s largest producers of bleaches and caustic soda. In 1968, The Occidental Chemical Company (OxyChem), purchased Hooker Chemical, and continued to manufacture polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resins, chlorine and caustic soda. These items are the key building blocks for a variety of products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals and water disinfectants.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford has represented Hooker Chemical laborers who worked in a wide variety of trades at the plant. These trades include carpenters, millwrights, masons, maintenance men and riggers. We have also represented production workers involved in maintenance shutdowns. Periodically, Hooker Chemical ceased its operations so that pipes, vessels and gaskets could be refurbished and replaced. Laborers involved in shutdowns were exposed to asbestos-containing insulating materials. As a result of asbestos exposure, many workers may have developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

Aside from asbestos exposure, those who regularly came into proximity of Hooker’s Niagara Falls facilities were placed at risk for benzene and dioxin exposure. Benzene is a chemical used in the production of plastic, and dioxin is a hazardous end product developed from manufacturing plastic. Both benzene and dioxin are known carcinogens. Hooker Chemical used benzene in its plastic division, and government reports as recent as 2008, demonstrate that the ground under and around the Hooker plant contains potentially dangerous levels of dioxin.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type of chemicals used at Hooker Chemical and the potential health hazards of their use. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or other chemical exposure-related conditions. If you or a loved one were once employed at Hooker Chemical’s Niagara Falls facility and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another form of cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Hudson Plastering Corporation

The George E. Hudson Corporation was established in 1927 as a plastering and insulation contractor. In 1938, the company’s name changed to Hudson Plastering Corporation, and its main offices were located at 50 Stradtman Street in Cheektowaga, New York, until the company dissolved in 1982. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used by Hudson Plastering, including fireproof insulation, acoustic plaster and tile, and joint compound (mud). Employees who worked for Hudson Plastering applied asbestos-containing products manufactured by W.R. Grace, U.S. Mineral, Keasbey and Mattison, Georgia-Pacific, National Gypsum and USG. These materials were applied at numerous locations throughout Western New York, including the Albright Knox Art Gallery, Main Place Mall and Tower, Leisure Land Bowling Alley and Temple Beth Zion. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproofers who applied asbestos-containing fireproofing materials, such as Limpet, are at high risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Hudson Plastering used Limpet, a mix of crocidolite asbestos fibers and Portland cement, for fireproofing, soundproofing and insulation purposes. This fireproofing material was applied at numerous job sites throughout Western New York, including The Park School of Buffalo, Buffalo/Niagara Airport and Leisure Land Bowling Alley. Limpet was packaged in bags and dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto surfaces with a hose. During the application process, large clouds of asbestos dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where Limpet was being applied. Electricians and plasterers, who also worked on or in the vicinity of where Limpet was applied, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust.

As a contractor, Hudson Plastering was also involved in the application of asbestos-containing joint compound (mud) in order to seal seams between sheets of drywall. Asbestos containing joint compound was manufactured as either a dry mix (a powder that requires water in order to form a paste for application) or as ready-mix (an application-ready product). Dry mix joint compound was packaged in paper bags, and it was mixed with water, in order to form a paste, and applied to the drywall. Three coats of joint compound were generally required to drywall seams. After one coat of compound dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface. During both the mixing and sanding processes of asbestos joint compound, dust and fibers were released into the air putting not only drywall finishers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the same vicinity.

Asbestos was also incorporated into acoustical ceiling spray, cement, ceiling and floor tiles applied and installed by Hudson Plastering. It was common for members of the Plasterers Local #9 Union to spray and apply acoustical ceiling spray to ceiling and wall surfaces. Asbestos-containing ceiling spray was very similar to fireproofing materials. During the application process, large clouds of asbestos dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where it was being applied. Once asbestos became airborne, it remained in the air for quite some time. After the asbestos dust settled, the movements of workers in the area stirred the dust back into the air, which placed even more workers at risk for asbestos exposure.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have represented numerous Hudson Plastering employees, Plasterers Local #9 Union members and their family members who have developed mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked for Hudson Plastering and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Hutchinson Technical High School

Hutchinson Technical High School (Hutch Tech) was established in 1904 as Mechanic Arts High School in Buffalo, New York. In 1905, it was renamed Buffalo Technical High School. The school was originally located on Elm Street, but it moved to a new building on Eagle Street in 1914 because of overcrowding. In 1954, the school moved once again, into the former Hutchinson High School building, and it was renamed Hutchinson Technical. Currently, Hutch Tech enrolls about 1,100 students each year. The high school offers a full Regents curriculum, as well as classes in biochemical technology, computer technology and engineering technology.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials. During renovations and maintenance procedures at Hutchinson Technical High School, workers removed and applied asbestos-containing building materials. Asbestos was incorporated into insulation that covered hot water pipes and associated equipment within the building’s steam heat system. Asbestos block insulation was applied to steam boilers and hot water tanks. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized throughout the heating system at Hutchinson Technical High School. Gaskets ensured a tight seal between pipe flanges and other equipment, such as pumps, valves and boilers. Due to wear and tear, gaskets were frequently removed and replaced. When a gasket was replaced, it was scraped off the flange. A new gasket was then cut from a sheet of asbestos-containing gasket material. The gasket replacement process emitted asbestos dust into the air. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you were once a laborer or maintenance employee who worked at Hutchinson Technical High School in Buffalo, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

IBM Endicott

International Business Machines (IBM) Binghamton was founded in 1911 in Endicott, New York, and it is one of the largest and most profitable corporations in the world. Originally called the Computing-TabulatingRecording (CTR) Corporation, IBM was formed by the merger of four companies: the Tabulating Machine Company, the International Time Recording Company, the Computing Scale Corporation, and the Bundy Manufacturing Company. IBM assumed its current name in 1924 to reflect its growing presence worldwide.

The Endicott, New York plant was IBM’s first manufacturing facility, and it manufactured a variety of products, including data processing machines, punch cards, printers, circuit boards, microelectronics, automated teller machines and computer components. During its peak production years, IBM Endicott employed nearly 11,000 people, and its plant consisted of over thirty buildings on thirty-nine acres of land. In 2002, IBM sold its Endicott plant to Endicott Interconnect Technologies. It continues to lease space in Endicott for research and development laboratories.

Prior to the 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized at IBM Endicott’s plant as a component of dozens of materials, such as pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and gaskets. Workers who utilized asbestos-containing materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos related diseases.

Workers applied asbestos-containing pipe covering to steam pipes at the IBM Endicott plant to protect the pipes from damage and to maintain stable internal temperatures within the system. When pipe covering was cut and applied, asbestos dust and fibers were emitted. Insulating cement was also applied to pipe elbows and valves.

Asbestos-containing cement was packaged as a dry powder. Prior to application, the powdered cement was mixed with water until it formed a paste. Pouring and mixing insulating cement caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. Boilers were also covered in asbestos block insulation, which was cut to fit the contours of the boiler. When workers installed block insulation, asbestos dust was released into the air and inhaled by workers.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also used to ensure a tight seal between the flanges for steam pipes and flanges for other equipment in the steam system, such as pumps, valves or boilers. Gaskets were frequently replaced during maintenance and repairs. During the gasket replacement process, workers scraped gaskets off the flange, which caused asbestos fibers to become airborne.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information on the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at IBM Endicott and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Union Local #7

Local 7 of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers is a labor union that represents boilermakers throughout Western and Central New York. Headquartered in Orchard Park, New York, Local 7 became one of the first boilermakers’ unions in the United States when it received its charter in 1881 from the International Brotherhood of Boiler Makers and Iron Ship Builders, which was the precursor to the modern boilermakers’ international union. The boilermakers’ union is affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO).

Union boilermakers work in many different industrial facilities, such as power plants, oil refineries, chemical plants and manufacturing facilities. Boilermakers’ job responsibilities include boiler construction and maintenance, fabrication of storage vessels and construction of equipment used in chemical manufacturing processes. Local 7 boilermakers have worked at various jobsites throughout Western and Central New York, including Bethlehem Steel, DuPont, Rochester Gas & Electric and Niagara Mohawk power plants, Ashland Oil, Kodak and Carrier Corporation. The manufacturers of industrial boilers that union boilermakers worked on included Riley Stoker, Combustion Engineering, Babcock & Wilcox, and Erie City.

During boiler maintenance and repairs, Local 7 boilermakers routinely accessed the interior of boilers and related equipment. Boilers, steam pipes, valves and pumps were covered with asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Steam boilers were covered with asbestos-containing block insulation and insulating cement; boilermakers removed this insulation in order to access the boiler interior during maintenance or repair of the boiler’s fire tubes. Pipes, pumps and valves connected to the boiler were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. During the course of their work, boilermakers often disturbed, damaged or removed this insulation. When asbestos-containing insulation was removed, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked as a boilermaker for Local 7 and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

International Paper Ticonderoga

The Ticonderoga Pulp & Paper Company was established in 1882 in Ticonderoga, New York, by Clayton Delano. Over the next several decades, the company constructed several mills in the village in order to manufacture various types of paper, including newsprint, writing paper and packaging materials. There were six separate mills in Ticonderoga:

» “A” Mill – Near Lake George on Alexandria Avenue

»   “B” Mill – Northwest of “A” Mill on Lord Howe Street

» “C” Mill – North of “B” Mill on Lord Howe Street, near the mouth of Trout Brook

» “D” Mill – East of “C” Mill on Lake George Avenue

» Island Mill (or “E” Mill) – East of “D” Mill on Champlain Avenue

» Lower Mill (or “F” Mill) – East of the Island Mill on Montcalm Street

In 1925, the Ticonderoga Pulp & Paper Company was acquired by the International Paper Company. For many years, the mills in Ticonderoga were among the most productive paper mills in the United States. By 1970, however, a combination of greater production needs and environmental concerns led International Paper to close its mills in the village and consolidate production in a new facility on Shore-Airport Road, four miles north of Ticonderoga. The older mills were demolished. The new mill is situated on 2169 acres of land, and it employs around 900 people. The mill produces around 850 tons of various grades of paper per year.

Prior to the mid to late 1970s, boilers and associated steam and water pipes at International Paper in Ticonderoga were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material were also utilized within valves, pumps and flanges associated with steam and chemical lines. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used during manufacturing processes, and it was also used to heat buildings throughout the facility. A network of pipes delivered steam to radiators and manufacturing equipment. Boilers, pumps, valves and pipes were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. Workers who performed maintenance within the steam system removed asbestos insulation in order to gain access to the equipment. When these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. The process of removing and applying asbestos insulation to equipment in the steam system caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

Asbestos-containing gaskets ensured a tight seal between flanges, pumps and valves, which were also utilized throughout steam, water and chemical lines. Asbestos-containing packing material was wrapped around pump shafts and valve stems in order to prevent fluid leaks. Gaskets and packing material were often replaced during maintenance on pumps and valves.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the International Paper Company mill in Ticonderoga, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Ironworkers Local 6 – Buffalo

Local 6 of the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers represents union ironworkers in a large portion of Western New York. Headquartered in West Seneca, New York, Local 6 has jurisdiction over iron work in Erie and Cattaraugus Counties, as well as parts of Chautauqua, Allegany, Wyoming and Steuben Counties. Chartered in 1901, Local 6 was one of the original locals of the international union. The ironworkers’ union is affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). Ironworkers are involved in various types of construction, including bridge construction; fabrication of concrete reinforcing rods; and, erecting structural steel for buildings. Local 6 ironworkers worked at nearly every industrial site and participated in major construction projects throughout Western New York. Local 6 Ironworkers were involved in building and industrial site projects at Bethlehem Steel, Marine Midland Center, Republic Steel, Ashland Oil, Main Place Tower, and many local hospitals, power plants and public buildings.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were commonly incorporated into numerous building materials. Even though Local 6 Ironworkers rarely worked with asbestos containing materials, they were routinely exposed to asbestos that was applied and removed by tradesmen, including fireproofers, carpenters, boilermakers, electricians, laborers and insulators. Most tradesmen were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos and performed their work without masks or protective gear. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Tradesmen who worked on construction projects and at industrial sites throughout New York State utilized a variety of asbestos-containing materials. Fireproofers sprayed asbestos fireproof insulation onto structural steel. Insulators applied and removed asbestos-containing pipe covering from hot water and steam pipes. Plasterers and drywall finishers mixed, applied and sanded asbestos-containing joint compound during building construction. Local 6 Ironworkers may have been present when other trades used asbestos-containing materials. When asbestos-containing materials were abraded, applied or removed, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked as a Local 6 Ironworker and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Ironworkers Local 9 – Niagara Falls

Local 9 of the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers is a labor union that represents ironworkers in Niagara County. Founded in 1902, Local 9 is one of the oldest ironworkers’ unions in the United States. Headquartered in Niagara Falls, the union has jurisdiction over all iron work in Niagara County, as well as parts of Orleans and Erie Counties. The ironworkers’ union is affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). Ironworkers are involved in various types of construction, including erecting structural steel for buildings, bridge construction and fabrication of concrete reinforcing rods. Local 9 ironworkers worked at nearly every major industrial site in Niagara County, including Carbide Graphite, Hooker Chemical, Carborundum, Durez Plastics and Simonds Saw and Steel.

Although ironworkers rarely worked with asbestos-containing materials during building construction, they were routinely exposed to asbestos utilized by other tradesmen, such as insulators, carpenters, boilermakers and laborers. Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous insulating and construction materials utilized by insulators, boilermakers, plasterers, laborers, fireproofers, electricians and other construction tradesmen. Members of Local 9 have developed and died from mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases as a result of their exposure to asbestos while working as ironworkers.

Asbestos-containing materials were utilized in many different forms at large construction sites and industrial plants. Steam and hot water pipes were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering. Insulators sprayed asbestos fireproof insulation onto structural steel. Boilers were covered with asbestos-containing block insulation and insulating cement, and boiler maintenance access doors were sealed with asbestos rope or gaskets. Asbestos-containing joint compound and plaster were utilized during building construction. When these materials were applied, removed or disturbed, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked as a Local 9 ironworker and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Ithaca College

Founded in 1892 as the Ithaca Conservatory of Music, Ithaca College is a liberal arts college offering degrees in over 100 areas of study. The college was originally located in the historic Boardman House. Steady growth in enrollment following World War Two compelled Ithaca College to expand, and a new campus was constructed on South Hill in the early 1960s. The college enrolls nearly 6,400 students every year. Situated on 650 acres, the Ithaca College campus consists of over ninety buildings, including lecture halls, dormitories, laboratories, administrative offices and athletic facilities. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos

was incorporated into dozens of materials utilized in the construction and maintenance of buildings at Ithaca College, including fireproofing, pipe covering, and insulating cement. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel during the construction of buildings throughout the Ithaca College campus. The insulation was manufactured as a dry mixture, and it was packaged in large paper bags. The dry mixture was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel. The process of mixing and spraying fireproof insulation created clouds of asbestos fibers and dust. After fireproofing was applied, it was disturbed by tradesmen, such as plumbers or electricians, who needed to access equipment housed within the structural steel. When the fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos fibers became airborne.

Steam used for heating the buildings at Ithaca College was delivered through a system of pipes. These pipes were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering, and equipment associated with the steam system, such as valves and pumps, were covered in insulating cement. Asbestos was used as a component in pipe covering and insulating cement because of its inherent strength and ability to withstand high temperatures. During maintenance or repair of the steam system, workers removed the pipe covering and insulating cement in order to access necessary equipment. When the insulation and cement was removed and reapplied, asbestos dust and fibers were emitted.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at Ithaca College were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the Ithaca College and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

J & K Boiler

J&K Boiler Co., Inc., was located at 51 West Third Street in Oswego, New York, and it provided residential and commercial plumbing, as well as the installation and removal of boilers. J&K Boiler also employed laborers to perform routine maintenance on existing boilers, such as the changing of blow out valves. During the 1970s J&K Boiler serviced regional businesses, local school buildings, Oswego Hospital, and nursing homes, in addition to private residences throughout Oswego County.

Up until the late 1970s, numerous residential boilers and furnaces were either covered in asbestos-containing insulation or incorporated asbestos insulation throughout interior sections, as found in square sectional boilers. Asbestos served as an excellent insulation material because of its durability and fire-resistant properties. Asbestos insulation also allowed for boilers and furnaces to operate properly. Massive exposure to asbestos occurred when boilermakers, plumbers and/or HVAC personnel installed, maintained and removed residential and commercial boilers and furnaces. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In the process of representing boilermakers, plumbers, HVAC personnel and their families, our attorneys have gathered numerous medical and liability documents that could be instrumental in your legal representation. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease as a result of working with or around residential boilers and/or furnaces, contact us today for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Jamestown Post Office

The first post office in Jamestown, New York, was established in 1817, and it was located in Jamestown’s first general store on Main Street. Judge James Prendergast, a federal magistrate, was Jamestown’s first Postmaster, and he served in this position until October 15, 1824. In the years that followed, the Jamestown Post Office moved to several different locations. It was not until 1959, that a permanent location was established for the Jamestown Post Office in the US Federal Building at East Third and Prendergast Avenues. The post office occupied 38,960 square feet of the Federal Building. The new building contains offices for various federal agencies, including FBI, military recruiting and a post office. On June 5, 1965 this building was enlarged to include 29 additional offices in Allegany and Cattaraugus counties, making a total of 75 offices served by this Sectional Center in Jamestown. In 2008, the building was renamed Stan Lundine Post Office Building.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous materials used in the construction of Jamestown’s Federal Building. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing joint compound (mud) was applied to seal seams between sheets of drywall. Ready-mix joint compound was commonly packaged in five gallon buckets, and it was applied without any additional preparation. After a coat of joint compound dried, it was sanded and another coat was applied. Sanding the joint compound emitted asbestos dust into the air, where it remained for quite some time.

Vinyl asbestos floor tiles (VAT) were used throughout the Federal building in Jamestown. During shipment, some tiles were cracked or broken, which produced asbestos dust that contaminated the box. When a worker opened the box and removed tiles, asbestos dust became airborne. Cutting vinyl asbestos tiles also emitted asbestos fibers and dust into the air.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of the U.S. Federal Building and Post Office in Jamestown, New York, were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the U.S. Federal Building and Post Office and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Jennison Generating Station

In 1945, the Jennison Generating Station was constructed in Bainbridge, New York, by New York State Electric & Gas (NYSEG), and it was named for a former NYSEG president, Ralph

  1. Jennison. Originally, Jennison Station was capable of producing 30 kilowatts of electrical power. Upgrades during the 1950’s and 1960’s increased the plant’s output to 73 kilowatts produced by two turbine generators that were powered by coal-fired boilers. Jennison

Station was one of the smaller power plants in NYSEG’s distribution system. In 1999, NYSEG sold the plant to AES Corporation, and in 2000, Jennison Station was permanently shut down.

Up until the late 1970s, laborers at Jennison Station applied and removed asbestos-containing materials during maintenance procedures. Pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and gaskets contained asbestos. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, or those who worked in the vicinity of where these materials were used, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Turbine generators at Jennison Station were powered by steam produced in boilers. A network of pipes, pumps, valves and steam traps delivered steam to the turbines. In order for the steam system to effectively produce steam, asbestos-containing insulation was applied to a majority of equipment within the steam system. During maintenance procedures, workers removed worn insulation and replaced it with new insulation when these procedures were completed.

Jennison Station periodically went into a “shutdown” maintenance period. During a shutdown, workers performed maintenance on the steam system. Insulation contractors or laborers sawed and scraped worn asbestos pipe covering and block insulation from steam pipes and equipment. Asbestos-containing gaskets were also scraped from flanges, and new gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Jennison Generating Station or at a NYSEG facility, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Joy Manufacturing

Joy Manufacturing Company was established in 1955 in Western New York, and at that time, employed four engineers. Shortly after it was established, Joy Manufacturing opened a Research and Development facility at 3101 Broadway Avenue in Cheektowaga, New York, for the purpose of designing and developing gas turbines, steam turbines, axial flow compressors and other equipment. During the 1960s, Joy Manufacturing narrowed its focus and primarily designed and manufactured centrifugal air compressors. The company’s focus shifted again in the 1980s with the development of a low cost air plant compressor utilizing computer-based design software. In 1987, Cooper Industries acquired Joy Manufacturing Company and formed a new air compressor division known as Cooper-Turbo Compression. In 2006, Cooper Industries changed its name to Cameron.

Prior to the late 1970s, the men and women who worked at Joy Manufacturing were unknowingly at risk of exposure to asbestos. Asbestos-containing gaskets were used throughout the plant during the installation, repair and maintenance of pumps, valves, steam traps and strainers, and turbines. Asbestos gaskets were used because of their durability and ability to withstand high temperatures and corrosive materials. Asbestos cement and asbestos Bakelite or plastic components, such as termination blocks, arch shields and fuse blocks were used during the installation of electric motors and switches. This equipment also frequently contained asbestos paper, cloth, board and insulated cable and wire. Applying and removing asbestos-containing materials gives rise to large amounts of asbestos dust. Exposure to asbestos-containing products can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer, years after an initial exposure to airborne asbestos fibers.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked at Joy Manufacturing and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Keene Insulation

Keene Insulation Contracting Division was located at 803 Walden Avenue in Buffalo, New York. Keene Insulation Contracting Division, also known as the Gale Corporation, was a contracting branch of the Keene Corporation, a manufacturer of asbestos-containing insulation materials. Up until the late 1970s, laborers who were employed by Keene applied and removed a variety of asbestos-containing insulation materials at commercial and industrial sites throughout Western New York. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Keene Insulation Contracting used many different brands of asbestos-containing insulating materials, including Philip Carey and Owens-Corning. Keen also manufactured its own asbestos insulation materials, and it was supplied with asbestos-containing insulating materials by local insulation distributors, including Insulation Distributors, Inc., and Niagara Insulation. Keene’s Walden Avenue office was a two-story building that included an insulation fabrication shop where asbestos insulation was cut, sawed and manipulated. Laborers who were employed by Keene applied asbestos-containing pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement at dozens of commercial and industrial job sites throughout the Western New York area including:

» Buffalo General Hospital

» St. Joseph’s Hospital

» SUNY Buffalo Law School

»  Millard Fillmore Hospital

» Samuel A. Carlson Generating Station, Jamestown

»   Kohlbacher’s

» Mentholatum Company

» Erie County Savings Bank

»   Mount St. Mary’s Hospital

» Monroe Community College

» Rochester Gas & Electric Stations

»   Strong Memorial Hospital

»   Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

» Niagara Mohawk (Huntley Plant)

» SUNY Buffalo Health Sciences Building

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by employees of Keene Insulation Contracting Division. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed by the Keene Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Kendall Refining Company

The Kendall Refining Company was established in 1881 in Bradford, Pennsylvania, by Eli Loomis, William Willis and Robert Childs. Bradford was selected as a site for a refinery because it’s close to the large and highly productive oil fields of Northwestern Pennsylvania and in the Southern Tier of New York State. The Bradford oil field was one of the most productive oil fields in the world for decades after Kendall was founded. The Kendall refinery was acquired by Witco Corporation in 1966, and in 1997, it was acquired by the American Refining Group. Located on North Kendall Avenue in Bradford, the refinery consists of five processing units, hundreds of storage tanks and dozens of buildings. The former Kendall refinery currently employs around 250 people, and it has a production capacity of 11,000 barrels of oil per day.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the early 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into insulating materials at the Kendall refinery, such as block insulation, pipe covering, gaskets, insulating cement and packing material. Workers who utilized asbestos-containing materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Miles of pipeline throughout the refinery was insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering. Pumps, valves and other associated equipment were covered with asbestos insulating cement. Workers removed and reapplied these asbestos-containing materials during maintenance procedures. Handling, removing and applying asbestos-containing materials caused asbestos fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Flanges between pipes, valves and pumps were sealed with asbestos-containing gasket material. During maintenance procedures, workers scraped old, worn gaskets off flanges. The old gaskets were replaced with either prefabricated gaskets, or gaskets cut from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Pump shafts and valve stems were sealed with asbestos packing material in order to prevent leaks. Old packing material was removed from pumps and valves with a packing hook, and new packing material was cut to fit. When gaskets and packing material were removed and replaced, asbestos dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at the Kendall Refining Company in Bradford, Pennsylvania, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Kenmore Mercy Hospital

Kenmore Mercy Hospital was established in 1951 by the Sisters of Mercy, a Roman Catholic religious order. Located on Elmwood Avenue in Kenmore, New York, the hospital has 184 inpatient beds, and it offers emergency care, orthopedics and cardiology services. Kenmore Mercy Hospital is also one of the six designated stroke centers for Erie and Wyoming Counties. Since the 1950’s, Kenmore Mercy has completed several expansions and renovations in order to keep up with increased demand for its services.

Up until the late 1970s and during construction and renovation procedures at Kenmore Mercy Hospital, workers utilized dozens of asbestos-containing materials. Fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, boilers and associated equipment throughout the hospital. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos related diseases.

Workers applied fireproof insulation to the structural steel throughout the hospital in order to protect it from potential fire damage. Fireproofing material was manufactured as a dry mixture of asbestos, cement and linen, and it was packaged in heavy paper bags. The insulation material was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. The fireproofing application process produced clouds of asbestos-containing dust and fibers, which workers inhaled. Additionally, tradesmen, such as carpenters, plumbers and electricians, disturbed the fireproofing in order to install framing studs or electrical conduits. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Additionally, Kenmore Mercy Hospital’s heating system included steam boilers and an extensive system of pipes and radiators. In order to maintain a steady internal temperature in the heating system, boilers, pipes and valves were insulated with asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. During maintenance and repair procedures, asbestos-containing materials were removed in order to make repairs within the heating system. When maintenance or repair procedures were complete, workers applied new asbestos insulation. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulating materials caused asbestos fibers and dust to become airborne.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Kenmore Mercy Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Kenmore Mercy Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Kensington High School

Kensington High School was established in 1937 as a project of the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works. Located on Suffolk Street in Buffalo, New York, the school enrolled around 800 students per year. In 2004, the Buffalo City School District closed Kensington High School, citing poor academic performance and disciplinary problems. Currently, the former Kensington High School building is undergoing renovations. The building will be occupied by Frederick Law Olmstead High School when renovations are completed.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970’s, workers utilized asbestos containing materials during maintenance procedures at Kensington High School. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Kensington High School’s heat was produced by a system of steam boilers. A network of pipes delivered the steam to radiators throughout the building. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, valves, pumps and boilers within the heating system. During repairs or maintenance, worn asbestos insulation was removed in order to access equipment within the heating system.

New asbestos-containing insulation was applied after repair or maintenance procedures were completed. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. Our attorneys have the combined experience of more than thirty years representing victims of mesothelioma. If you were once a laborer or maintenance employee who worked at Kensington High School in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Kerr Glass Manufacturing Corp.

KERR GLASS MANUFACTURING Company was a prominent Manufacturing plant in Lancaster, Pennsylvania that made and sold different types of plastic molded products for various industries.

During the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, some of the molding compounds that Kerr Glass used to make their plastic molded products contained asbestos.

The companies that manufactured and supplied asbestos containing molding compounds to Kerr Glass knew about the health hazards of asbestos but they did not warn Kerr Glass or its employees of these health hazards.

Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Molders, finishers and other laborers at Kerr Glass were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process not knowing it could harm them.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos containing plastic molding compounds but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a family member ever worked at Kerr Glass at their Lancaster Pennsylvania plant at any time during either the 1950’s, 1960’s, or 1970’s and have contracted mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact the attorneys at Lipsitz & Ponterio, LLC. You may be entitled to compensation for your asbestos related injuries.

Kimberly Clark

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, has represented numerous Kimberly Clark employees who developed mesothelioma or lung cancer as a result of working at this site. Kimberly Clark on Packard Road in Niagara Falls, New York, manufactured sanitary specialties, including familiar products such as Kleenex facial tissues and Kotex sanitary napkins.

On the Kimberly Clark property, there were two buildings, Mill number 1 (the boiler house) and Mill number 2 (the main building). Housed in Mill 1 were three large boilers completely covered in asbestos-containing insulation. These three boilers were responsible for powering the many large paper machines located in Mill 2, as well as heating the entire facility. Hot water and steam were transported from the boiler house to the rest of the facility by way of asbestos-insulated pipe. Outside contractors sawed and cut asbestos-containing pipe covering and applied sections of the pipe covering to the pipes that transported hot water and steam from the boiler house to the rest of the facility. The process of cutting and sawing this material released asbestos fibers into the air where other tradesmen and plant workers labored.

In addition to the miles of asbestos covered pipe, there were numerous pumps, valves, and steam traps which incorporated asbestos-containing gaskets and packing and were often covered with asbestos insulation. Millwrights and pipefitters frequently disturbed the asbestos contained in these pieces of equipment causing asbestos dust to become airborne.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. Our attorneys have the combined experience of more than thirty years representing victims of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one were once employed at Kimberly Clark in Niagara Falls, NY and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Kleinhans Music Hall

Located on Symphony Circle in Buffalo, New York, Kleinhans Music Hall was constructed in 1940 through an endowment from the estate of Edward and Mary Kleinhans and a grant from the United States Public Works Administration. It was designed by renowned architects Eliel and Eero

Saarinen, and since 1989, it has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Historic Landmark. Kleinhans Music Hall is home to the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, and it hosts events and musical performances in a wide variety of genres.

Up until the late 1970s, a variety of building materials contained asbestos. During construction and renovation procedures at Kleinhans Music Hall, workers applied and removed asbestos containing acoustical plaster, pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and fireproof insulation. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos related diseases.

Acoustical plaster was applied to the ceilings and walls at Kleinhans Music Hall in order to reduce sound reverberation during performances. The plaster was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water in order to prepare it for application. Mixing acoustical plaster with water caused asbestos dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

During the initial construction of Kleinhans Music Hall, workers applied asbestos-containing fireproof insulation to the building’s structural steel. The fireproof insulation utilized at Kleinhans was a mixture of asbestos, cement and linen. In order to apply the insulation, it was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. The fireproofing process created large clouds of asbestos dust and fibers, which remained airborne for days after the initial application. Additionally tradesmen, including carpenters, electricians and pipefitters, disturbed the fireproof insulation after it was applied in order to install framing studs, conduits or pipes. When the fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos dust became airborne.

Kleinhans Music Hall was heated by steam, which was produced in boilers. Pipes within the heating system were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos block insulation covered the steam boilers. Asbestos-containing insulating cement was applied to pumps and valves. During maintenance or repairs to the heating system, workers removed worn asbestos insulation. New insulation was applied after the maintenance or repair procedures were completed. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation released asbestos dust into the air.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked in construction or maintenance at Kleinhans Music Hall and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory

In 1946, the United States Government initiated a contract with the General Electric Corporation (GE) in order to establish a facility committed to the research and development of electrical generation by means of nuclear energy. The federal government constructed the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) on the bank of the Mohawk River in Niskayuna, New York, and GE was contracted to operate the facility. After several years of research into civilian nuclear power generation and in 1951, the Knolls laboratory joined several other national laboratories researching nuclear propulsion for the United States Navy.

Research and development conducted at KAPL led directly to the successful design, construction and operation of several types of reactors used in submarines, destroyers, cruisers and aircraft carriers. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory conducts reactor operator training for US Navy personnel at a separate site in West Milton, New York, about fifteen miles from KAPL. Over 50,000 officers and sailors have been trained at West Milton in the past 60 years. In 1993, GE transferred supervision of the Knolls laboratory to the Martin Marietta Corporation, which in 1995, became Lockheed Martin. In 2008, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation took over operation of the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Niskayuna, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Niskayuna, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Knowlton Brothers

In 1808, Gurdon Caswell constructed a paper mill, called the Pioneer Mill, near the Black River in Watertown, New York, on what is now called Factory Street. In 1824, George W. Knowlton and Clarke Rice acquired the mill and renamed it Knowlton & Rice. The Knowlton & Rice Company manufactured paper for books and also provided including printing and binding services. In 1848, the paper mill was destroyed by a fire and rebuilt the mill the next year. In 1854, Charles Brown and Edward Chamberlain acquired the mill, and it was renamed Brown & Chamberlain. After Brown & Chamberlain defaulted on their mortgage in 1862, the mill’s ownership returned to the Knowlton family.

George W. Knowlton’s sons, John C. Knowlton and George W. Knowlton, Jr., took over management of the mill and renamed it Knowlton Brothers. During the 1870’s, Knowlton Brothers began manufacturing various types of colored paper because the water of the Black River had become too dark and dirty to manufacture white paper. Over the next century, the company developed many different types of paper used in a variety of products, including photographic paper, automotive filters, office products and military equipment.

In 1987, Franklin D. Cean acquired the company from the Knowlton family, and the mill was renamed Knowlton Specialty Paper. In 2008, the mill celebrated its 200th anniversary. The mill was acquired by its management team and renamed Knowlton Technologies. Eastman Chemical purchased Knowlton Technologies in 2014. Knowlton currently employs around 100 people, and it is the oldest continuously operating paper mill in the United States.

Prior to the late 1970’s, boilers and associated steam and water pipes at Knowlton Brothers were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. At Knowlton Brothers, steam was used during manufacturing processes, and it was also used to heat the mill. A network of pipes delivered steam to manufacturing equipment.

Boilers, pumps, valves and pipes were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. Workers who performed maintenance within the steam system removed asbestos insulation in order to gain access to the equipment. When these procedures were completed, new asbestos insulation was applied. The process of removing and applying asbestos insulation to equipment in the steam system caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Workers at Knowlton Brothers also used asbestos-containing gaskets to ensure a tight seal between flanges, pumps and valves throughout steam and water lines. Asbestos-containing packing material was wrapped around pump shafts and valve stems in order to prevent fluid leaks. Gaskets and packing material were often replaced during maintenance on pumps and valves; the replacement process emitted asbestos dust, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos-containing materials remain at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Knowlton Brothers in Watertown, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Kodak

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents numerous former and retired Kodak workers, including a pipefitter, painter, millwright, carpenter, engineer, machine operator, mixer and skilledtrades helper in their legal claims for mesothelioma and lung cancer. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed.

Kodak workers were exposed to asbestos dust and fibers from working with and in the vicinity of a wide variety of asbestos-containing products, including thermal insulation in the form of pipe covering block and cement; sprayed-on products for sound proofing and thermal insulation; joint compound; and plastic molding compound.

Kodak Park was the largest plant owned by the Eastman Kodak Company. When Kodak Park was first established, it was a meager sixteen acres of farmland, and since then, it has grown into a plant occupying over one thousand acres. Paved streets, lawns, sewer and water treatment systems, railroad tracks and a power plant have turned this once small factory into a community unto itself.

In the rising age of film based photographic supplies, the Eastman Kodak Company led the way with new products to make photography simple and more useful. Kodak manufactures photographic film, papers and chemicals. Kodak has also produced film for the motion picture industry and is known for

their images used in a variety of applications. Since the advance of the digital age, Kodak’s traditional photographic market is changing and has moved towards the production of digital cameras, printers and accessories for digital photography and video. Still to this day, the Kodak brand is recognized in virtually every country of the world.

When the average individual thinks of Kodak, cameras and photographic supplies come to mind. Many would be surprised to learn that asbestos was present throughout Kodak Park during the production phase of photographic materials and supplies. Kodak workers were exposed to asbestos dust from working with and around a wide variety of asbestos-containing products. Asbestos was incorporated into pipe covering, gaskets, thermal insulation and packing material. Asbestos-containing insulation also covered pipe-steam lines, chemical and refrigeration lines. Asbestos block material covered duct work and turbines. Asbestos containing materials could be found in virtually every building that occupied Kodak Park.

In all probability, Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford has more experience in representing Kodak workers with mesothelioma than any other firm in the country. If you or a loved one was employed at Kodak in Rochester, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Laborers Local 210

Local 210 of the Laborers’ International Union of North America represents union laborers in Erie County. Chartered in 1913, the laborers’ union has jurisdiction over various types of construction, including concrete pouring; road construction; asbestos and hazardous material abatement; and job site cleanup. Local 210 laborers participated in nearly every major construction project and worked at numerous industrial sites in Erie County. Laborers worked on construction projects and industrial sites, such as Bethlehem Steel, Republic Steel, Semet- Solvay, Allied Chemical, Marine Midland Center, the Rath County Office Building, Main Place Tower, and many local power plants, schools, public buildings and foundries.

Up until the late 1970’s, asbestos was incorporated into materials applied, removed or handled by Local 210 laborers. Laborers were also exposed to asbestos by working in close proximity to other trades, such as insulators, carpenters, electricians and fireproofers. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and performed their work without wearing masks or protective gear. Members of Local 210 have developed and died from mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases as a result of their exposure to asbestos.

Asbestos-containing materials were utilized in many different applications at large construction sites and industrial plants. Laborers often handled and worked alongside tradesmen who applied and removed asbestos-containing materials. Asbestos was widely incorporated into many building materials and industrial products, including pipe covering, block insulation, roof shingles, joint compound and fireproof materials. It was common for laborers to be present when asbestos fireproofing was applied to structural steel in order to keep the machine loaded with the insulating material. During building construction, laborers routinely swept up dust and debris after drywall finishers sanded asbestos-containing joint compound. Additionally, laborers performed general duties on construction sites, which also exposed them to asbestos.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked as a Local 210 laborer and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Laborers Local 91 – Niagara Falls

Laborers’ Local 91 represents union laborers in Niagara County. In 1935, Local 91 was originally founded as the International Hod Carriers’ Building and Common Laborers’ Union of America. Local 91 in Niagara Falls is affiliated with the Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA). The members of Local 91 are involved in various types of construction and industrial projects, including brick masonry; asbestos removal; hazardous materials abatement; paving roads and runways; pipe installation; and bridge and building construction. Local 91 laborers have participated in various projects throughout Niagara County, such as Niagara Hydro-Electric Power Generating Station, AES Somerset Electric Generating Station, the Seneca Niagara Hotel and Casino, and the Yahoo Data Center.

Up until the late 1970s, Local 91 laborers were exposed to asbestos through materials they applied, removed or handled. Exposure to asbestos dust and fibers can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer many years after an initial exposure. Local 91 members were also exposed to asbestos dust by working in close proximity to other tradesmen, including insulators, carpenters, electricians, and fireproofers, who applied or removed asbestos-containing materials. Asbestos was widely incorporated into many building materials and industrial products that laborers applied or removed, including pipe covering, block insulation, roof shingles, joint compound and fireproof materials. It was also common for laborers to be present when asbestos fireproofing was applied to structural steel in order to keep the machine loaded with the insulating material. Among the many general duties of laborers, which would have exposed them to asbestos, laborers swept up dust and debris after drywall finishers sanded asbestos-containing joint compound. Additionally, laborers performed general duties on construction sites, which also exposed them to asbestos.

The dangers of exposure to asbestos dust were unknown to workers who performed their work without wearing masks or protective gear. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one worked as a Local 91 laborer and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW)

The former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) is a 7,500 acre site located in the towns of Lewiston and Porter, New York. In 1941, the Department of Defense (formerly Department of War) purchased land in Niagara County for the purpose of manufacturing trinitrotoluene (TNT). The LOOW manufactured nearly 42 million pounds of TNT in a nine month period, ceasing its TNT operations in 1943. During this time period, production and storage areas were built that mimicked barns, including a power plant, emergency medical facility, dormitories and water supply and waste treatment facilities. After the TNT plant was decommissioned, the Manhattan Engineering District of the US Army Corps of Engineers was given control over the property, and in 1944, a 1,500 acre portion of the LOOW was designated as the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), which is considered to be one of the most notorious radioactive storage sites in the United States. From 1944 until 1952, thousands of tons of radioactive wastes from the Manhattan Project and Atomic Energy Commission activities, including radioactive residues and wastes created by processing uranium ore at Linde Air in Tonawanda were buried at the Niagara Falls Storage Site.

During the mid-to-late 1950s, other sections of the LOOW were used by the United States military. In 1956, the US Army constructed a Nike surface-to-air missile base on the northern edge of the LOOW. When the missile base was decommissioned in 1966, the US Air Force acquired the base in order to conduct radar and communications research. Bell Aerospace also conducted rocket tests for the Air Force at Plant 38 at the LOOW. The Air Force also built an experimental plant (Air Force Plant 68) in which the Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation produced experimental boron-based jet and rocket fuels. The US Navy also operated an experimental boron fuel plant in conjunction with Olin Mathieson at the LOOW. Up until 1971, boron was produced in building 401 at the LOOW.

In 1971, the New York State Department of Health restricted the use of land inside the Niagara Falls Storage Site because of hazardous radiation levels. In the decades that followed, investigations conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers, state and federal agencies and groups of private citizens indicated that the soil at Lake Ontario Ordnance Works was potentially contaminated with a myriad of hazardous and toxic chemicals and materials, including asbestos, uranium, boron, plutonium, cesium, hydrazine; chemical warfare agents (phosgene); and biological warfare agents (anthrax).

A large portion of the original 7,500 acre Lake Ontario Ordnance Works property is currently owned by federal and local governments, active waste disposal operations, commercial businesses, private homeowners and other organizations. A hazardous waste disposal operation (CWM Chemical Services, LLC), a municipal solid waste landfill (Modern Corporation) and a radioactive waste containment facility (Niagara Falls Storage Site) occupy neighboring properties in the central portion of the LOOW. The New York State Army National Guard also maintains a training area on the north side of the LOOW. Lewiston-Porter Central School purchased land on the western edge of the property in 1948, and has since constructed school buildings on the site. The health and safety of homeowners, students and teachers from potential toxic hazards at the LOOW and NFSS sites has been the topic of many community meetings throughout the past two decades.

In addition to radiation concerns, asbestos-containing materials were used in the construction and maintenance of the buildings at the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized throughout many buildings at the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works. Asbestos-containing pipe covering covered steam and chemical lines. Boilers were insulated with asbestos-containing cement and asbestos block insulation. Asbestos was also incorporated into packing material and gaskets used inside pumps and valves. Corrugated asbestos cement board, or transite, was used as a siding and roofing material on many buildings at the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works and Niagara Falls Storage Site. Workers who applied, removed or manipulated asbestos-containing materials, or individuals who were in the vicinity of where this work took place, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works in Lewiston and Porter, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Leisure Land Bowling Alley

The former Leisure Land Bowling Alley on Camp Road in Hamburg, New York, opened in the late 1950s. With forty-eight bowling lanes, Leisure Land was one of the largest bowling alleys in Western New York. It contained more lanes than Orchard Park, Brierwood, Braymiller’s, Hamburg Legion and Victoria combined. In 2006, Leisure Land closed its doors due to a partial roof collapse that occurred during a massive snow storm in 2005. Repairs to the roof were not made and Leisure Land was forced out of business. After the roof collapse, asbestos-containing fireproofing debris was scattered throughout what was left of the building. This fireproofing material contained amphibole asbestos, one of the most dangerous forms of asbestos. Since then, the lot has been sold and the building demolished.

Carpenters, plasterers, pipe coverers, plumbers, insulators and boilermakers who assisted in the construction of the Leisure Land Bowling Alley were at high risk for exposure to asbestos. During the construction of Leisure Land, plastering companies such as Mader and Hudson Plastering applied Limpet, a fireproofing material that was sprayed on structural steel. This material came packaged in bags, which was dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and then sprayed onto surfaces with a hose. During the application process, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air where the material was being sprayed. Limpet also contained amphibole asbestos, which is one of the most dangerous forms of asbestos.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the 1970s, asbestos was a component of numerous building materials, including fireproofing, joint compound and pipe covering. At Leisure Land, asbestos-containing materials also insulated pipes, ducts and boilers. Laborers and tradesmen hired to apply, remove or work in the vicinity of these building materials may have been exposed to asbestos dust. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of Leisure Land Bowling Alley were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked on the construction of Leisure Land, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Liberty Building

The Liberty Building, constructed in 1925, served as the headquarters for Liberty National Bank. Located on Main Street, it is the fifth tallest building in Buffalo, New York, featuring two replica Statues of Liberty on its roof. The Liberty Building is twenty-three stories tall, and it houses commercial offices. During the early 1960s, an addition was built onto the southeast corner of the building, and in 1999, the building was renovated.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into building materials utilized during the construction of the Liberty Building. Workers who handled, removed or applied asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. There is currently no risk for exposure to asbestos-containing materials at the Liberty Building. The majority of the building has been abated.

During the Liberty Building’s initial construction, asbestos containing fireproof insulation was applied to its structural steel. Fireproof insulation was a mixture of cement, asbestos and linen packaged in large paper bags. Workers dumped bags of fireproof insulation into a machine where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. The fireproofing process created large clouds of asbestos-containing dust and fibers, which workers inhaled. Additionally laborers, including electricians, carpenters and plumbers, routinely disturbed the fireproof insulation after it was applied in order to fasten pipes or equipment to the structural steel. When fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos fibers became airborne.

The original heating system at the Liberty Building included an extensive system of steam boilers, pipes and radiators. Boilers, pipes, pumps and valves were insulated with asbestos-containing materials, such as insulating cement, pipe covering and block insulation. Asbestos-containing insulating materials were removed in order to make repairs within the heating system. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials emitted asbestos dust into the air. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Many union and non-union laborers who assisted in the construction of the Liberty Building were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the Liberty Building and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Linde Air Products Chandler Street Plant

Linde Air Products was founded in 1907, as the American subsidiary of German industrial gas manufacturer Linde AG. The original Linde plant was located on Chandler Street in Buffalo, New York. It was the first plant in the United States to manufacture liquid oxygen, and it also manufactured other industrial gases, such as acetylene, nitrogen and xenon. In 1917, Linde Air Products was acquired by Union Carbide. Linde transferred its manufacturing operations to its Tonawanda plant in 1937, but it continued to use the Chandler Street plant for research and development projects. During World War II, engineers at the Chandler Street plant developed equipment to refine weapons-grade uranium, as part of the Manhattan Project. The Chandler Street plant was sold after World War Two. The plant was demolished in 2005 after a series of fires damaged the structure.

Asbestos-containing materials were utilized during maintenance and repair procedures at the Chandler Street plant. Workers who applied and maintained asbestos-containing materials at Linde Air Products, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In order to insulate hoses used to offload liquid gases from tanker trucks, raw asbestos fiber was packed tightly into burlap bags and wrapped around the hoses. A paddle was used to pack the asbestos into the burlap bag. Handling and packing the raw asbestos fiber caused fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were used in pipe systems at the Linde Chandler Street plant to ensure a proper seal between pipe flanges, pumps or valves. Workers fabricated gaskets from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Cutting gasket materials emitted asbestos dust into the air. When a gasket was replaced during maintenance or repair procedures, it was scraped off its flange. Removing gaskets also released asbestos dust and fibers, which were inhaled by workers.

Steam was used to heat the Linde Chandler Street plant, and it was also used as a component of the manufacturing process. Boilers produced steam, which was delivered to radiators and manufacturing equipment through a system of pipes. Asbestos-containing block insulation, insulating cement and pipe covering were applied to pipes and boilers in order to maintain a steady internal temperature within the steam system. Workers removed asbestos-containing insulation during maintenance and repair procedures. New insulation was applied when maintenance or repair procedures were completed. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos fibers to become airborne.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at the Linde Chandler Street plant and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to con- tact us regarding your legal rights.

Liquid Carbonic Corporation

The Liquid Carbonic Corporation, originally known as the Liquid Carbonic Company, was established in 1888 in Terre Haute, Indiana. For over 50 years, Liquid Carbonic concentrated on the production and supply of carbon dioxide and equipment related to soda fountain and soft drink bottling. In 1914, Liquid Carbonic introduced a low-pressure filling system for bottled carbonated beverages, which increased production and revolutionized the industry. Liquid Carbonic sold Coca-Cola Bottling Company the first low-pressure, carbonated beverage bottle filling system in July 1914. During World War I, Liquid Carbonic searched for new production possibilities and in 1917, the company’s wood work and cabinet department began production of airplane propellers for the U.S. government. In 1926, Liquid Carbonic changed its name to Liquid Carbonic Corporation as the company expanded its network of carbon dioxide gas plants to Detroit, Indianapolis and Louisville. In that same year, Liquid Carbonic also began producing carbon dioxide snow and so-called “dry-ice” on a commercial scale.

In 1939, Liquid Carbonic Corporation began to manufacture industrial gases, and it acquired Wall Chemicals, Inc., a producer of oxygen, acetylene, and other compressed gases, with plants in Chicago, Detroit and Buffalo. An aggressive acquisition program soon followed, which transformed Liquid Carbonic into one of the world’s largest suppliers of industrial gases. In 1955, Liquid Carbonic began to distribute liquid oxygen, and a fully automated carbon dioxide plant was built in Oakland, California. In 1957, Liquid Carbonic merged with General Dynamics. Subsequently, in 1969, it became part of Houston Natural Gas Corporation. The following year, Liquid Carbonic entered into the specialty gas business. During the 1970s and 1980s Liquid Carbonic’s geographic expansion continued, and by 1981, it had a total of 85 carbon dioxide plants world-wide. In August 1984, Houston National Gas sold Liquid Carbonic Industries Corporation to CBI Industries Inc., a metal plate construction company. In 1996, Praxair purchased CBI and fully integrated Liquid Carbonic into their industrial gas organization, where it remains today.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance of the Liquid Carbonic facility in Albany, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. If you or a loved one were employed at Liquid Carbonic Corporation in the Capital District and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Lockport Memorial Hospital

Lockport Memorial Hospital was originally established as Lockport City Hospital in Lockport, New York, on July 1, 1908. The Ladies Hospital Aid Association raised $5,000 for the Hospital’s construction; the City of Lockport matched this amount. When the Hospital was first opened, it included 18 patient beds. As the community of Lockport grew, demands for Hospital’s services also increased and, from 1938-1983, it went through numerous expansions and renovations. In 1959, the Hospital’s name was changed to Lockport Memorial Hospital by the Lockport Common Council. In 1979, ownership of Lockport Memorial Hospital was transferred to a not-for-profit corporation with a community driven board of directors. Today, the Hospital sits in its original location at 521 East Avenue and is now part of Eastern Niagara Health System (ENHS).

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated as a component of insulation and building materials, including fireproofing materials, joint compound (mud), pipe covering and floor tile. These materials were used during construction and renovations at Lockport Memorial Hospital. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel at Lockport Memorial Hospital in order to protect the steel from fire damage and high heat temperatures. Asbestos was incorporated into fireproofing because of its fire resistant qualities and relatively low cost. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mix, which was typically packaged in one hundred pound bags. Raw fireproofing material was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto steel surfaces with a hose. During the mixing and application processes, an enormous amount of asbestos-containing dust and fibers were emitted into the work area. Laborers who worked in the vicinity of the application of fireproofing may have also inhaled asbestos dust and fibers. Additionally, tradesmen, such as pipefitters, electricians, ironworkers and carpenters routinely disturbed the fireproofing after it was installed in order to install pipes, conduits, wall framing, ventilation ducts and other building materials.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering, mastic, cement, and floor and ceiling tiles were also used during construction and renovations at Lockport Memorial Hospital. Laborers and tradesmen who were hired to apply, remove or work in the vicinity of asbestos-containing building materials may have been exposed to asbestos dust. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Lockport Memorial Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Lockport Memorial Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Louis DeMarkus Corporation

The Louis DeMarkus Corporation was founded in Buffalo, New York, in 1953 by Arnold Jacobowitz. Mr. Jacobowitz established his company after he purchased the DeMarkus Form (a carbon dioxide generation unit) from Hungarian physicist Louis DeMarkus. Mr. Jacobowitz opened the first DeMarkus Corporation manufacturing facility at 3080 Main Street in order to design and manufacture industrial gas equipment. In 1961, the company expanded operations and moved to a 100,000-square foot manufacturing facility located at 1210 East Ferry Street. As Louis DeMarkus Corporation grew, it branched out into nearly all phases of gas plant engineering, including the manufacture of hydrogen plants for the steel industry, carbon dioxide removal systems on board Navy submarines and other chemical process plants. During the 1960s and 1970s, Louis DeMarkus Corporation was also one of the leading manufacturers of industrial carbon dioxide generation equipment for the beverage industry. In 1986, the Louis DeMarkus Corporation went out of business.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement lined boilers, pipes, pumps and valves associated with the steam system and other equipment at Louis DeMarkus Corporation. Inhaling dust and particles from the application, maintenance and removal of asbestos materials placed workers at risk of developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Most workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and they carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. If you or a loved one worked at the Louis DeMarkus Corporation in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

M&T Plaza

One M & T Plaza is a twenty-one story high rise building located on Main and Eagle Streets in downtown, Buffalo, New York. Completed in 1967, the M & T building was designed by Minoru Yamasaki, the same architect who designed the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York City. The building is home to M & T Bank’s corporate headquarters and is the sixth-tallest building in Buffalo. During holidays and other special events, the top section of the building is illuminated in festive colors.

Construction of One M & T Plaza began in 1964. In recent years, workers who assisted in the construction of One M & T Plaza have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos-containing fireproofing, floor and ceiling tiles, pipe covering, boiler insulation, packing materials, mastic, and window glazing were used on a massive scale to construct the facility. Workers

who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of M & T Plaza were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of One M&T Plaza and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Mader Plastering

Mader Plastering started as a partnership between Edward Mader and Lawrence Reger in 1953. The company was founded as a small plastering company originally located in West Seneca, New York. Prior to the late 1970s, laborers who were employed by Mader installed and applied asbestos-containing building materials, including, fireproof insulation, joint compound (mud), ceiling tiles and sprayed-on acoustical insulation. Mader was one of the largest interior finishing companies in Western New York employing union Laborers, carpenters, plasterers, drywall finishers and tapers. In the late 1960s to early 1970s, independent contractors, Buffalo Acoustical and Rochester Acoustical, were acquired by Mader Plastering. Today, Mader is based in Elma, New York, and is known as Mader Construction Company, Inc.

Asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was typically applied to a building’s structural steel in order to protect it from high temperatures and fire damage. Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into many materials used by the construction industry, including fireproofing material. Fireproofing material was packaged in dry bags, dumped into a mixer with water, and sprayed through a hose and applied to steel. Dumping, mixing and spraying fireproof insulation created clouds of asbestos-containing dust. When fireproofing material was applied or disturbed, tradesmen, including electricians, plumbers, steamfitters, pipefitters, bricklayers and carpenters were also exposed to asbestos by merely working in the same vicinity as fireproofers. Asbestos-containing fireproofing brands used by Mader Plastering include: Blaze Shield, Thermal Acoustic, Cafco, Monokote, Spradon, U.S. Gypsum, National Gypsum, W.R. Grace and Zonolite Company. Fireproofing material was applied to a number of buildings throughout Western New York, including Women & Children’s Hospital, Marine Midland Center, the Donovan Building, the Dulski Federal Building, Main Place Mall and Tower, and the University at Buffalo’s North Campus, including the Law School, Ellicott Complex, Knox Hall and Baldy Hall. Workers applied asbestos-containing building materials without the knowledge that asbestos could cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Laborers who were employed by Mader Plastering also installed walls and ceilings. After World War II, the interior walls in homes and commercial buildings were almost exclusively constructed of prefinished gypsum board (drywall) and joint compound (mud). Asbestos was used as a filler material in joint compound, and it was sold as either ready-mix (an application-ready product) or as dry mix (a powder that requires water in order to form a paste for application). Common manufacturers of joint compound include Georgia Pacific and U.S. Gypsum. Joint compound was applied to seams and joints over drywall tape. After the compound dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface. During both the mixing process of asbestos joint compound and sanding process, dust and fibers were released into the air putting not only plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the same vicinity.

Asbestos-containing acoustical ceiling tiles were used in order to conceal HVAC ducts, electrical wires and plumbing. It was often necessary for laborers, employed by Mader, to cut the ceiling tiles to fit around irregular parts of the ceiling. Laborers, including carpenters, also kerfed (groove cut) tile so that ceiling tiles could properly fit into a spline or supporting members of a ceiling suspension system. Simply handling acoustical ceiling tiles produced asbestos-containing dust, and cutting or kerfing the ceiling tiles created a tremendous amount of asbestos dust that workers inhaled.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used by employees of the Mader Corporation. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed by the Mader Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Main Place Tower and Mall

Constructed in 1969, the Main Place complex is comprised of the Main Place Tower and Main Place Mall. Standing at twenty-six stories, the tower is the fourth-tallest building in Buffalo and houses commercial offices. Main Place Mall is the only shopping mall in downtown Buffalo, and in recent years, it has lost a great deal of its retail shops to suburban shopping centers. Asbestos-containing materials were utilized during the construction of the Main Place mall and tower, including fireproofing, ceiling tiles and pipe covering. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was applied to the building’s structural steel in order to protect it from high temperatures and fire damage. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was widely used as a component of fireproof insulation because of its resistance to heat and fire. This insulation was manufactured as a dry powder and shipped in heavy paper bags. Prior to application, the dry mix was poured into a machine and mixed with water. It was then sprayed onto steel structure surfaces. Dumping, mixing and spraying fireproof insulation created clouds of asbestos containing dust. Other construction trades, including electricians, pipefitters, and carpenters routinely disturbed the fireproof insulation in order to gain access to the structural steel. The tradesmen scraped away bits of the fireproofing with a metal scraper or screwdriver, emitting asbestos fibers into the work area.

Asbestos-containing acoustical ceiling tiles were installed in some areas during the construction of the Main Place complex. Simply handling ceiling tiles produced asbestos-containing dust. In order to accommodate irregular parts of a ceiling, or to allow for ventilation and lighting, it was often necessary to cut ceiling tiles using a jab saw. Cutting the ceiling tiles emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the breathing area of nearby workers.

Pipe covering that contained asbestos was also applied to pipe work throughout the Main Place complex. Handling or cutting lengths of pipe covering emitted asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. In order to cover a pipe elbow, insulating cement was used. Asbestos containing cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste-like substance. Pouring and mixing the insulating cement caused asbestos-containing dust and fibers to become airborne. Those who worked in the vicinity of where pipe insulation was cut and cement mixed are at risk of developing mesothelioma or another asbestos related disease.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction of the Main Place complex were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the Main Place Mall and Tower and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Marine Midland Center

The former Marine Midland Center (now One Seneca Tower), located in downtown Buffalo, New York. It was a 40-story, 841,000 square foot office tower that was once home to Marine Midland Bank. Completed in 1973, the Marine Midland Center was, at the time, the largest building in New York State outside of New York City. In recent years, laborers who assisted in the construction of the Marine Midland Center have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Construction of the Marine Midland Center began in 1969. Up until the mid to late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were widely used in the construction industry because of their ability to withstand high heat temperatures. Asbestos was also used for its soundproofing capabilities, as well as a fireproofing material. Laborers who assisted in the construction of the Marine Midland Center were often exposed to asbestos fibers and dust from the application of plaster, pipe covering, joint compound and fireproofing materials. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Fire proofers applied asbestos containing fireproofing materials, such as Monokote and Cafco, to the beams, decks and columns at Marine Midland Center. Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material came packaged in bags, which was then dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and then sprayed onto surfaces with a hose. During the application process, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air where the material was being applied. Electricians, plumbers and plasterers who also worked in the vicinity where the fireproof material was applied, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust.

Asbestos-containing joint compound and plaster was also utilized in the construction of the Marine Midland Center. About fifty percent of the walls and ceilings at Marine Midland Center were covered with sheet rock and joint compound. Joint compound was applied to seams and joints over drywall tape. After the compound dried, it was then sanded down to a smooth surface. Plaster was utilized on exterior walls and applied as seals on beams. During both the mixing and sanding process of asbestos-containing plaster and joint compound, dust and fibers were released into the air putting not only plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the surrounding vicinity.

Asbestos disease does not surface at the moment of exposure, and it takes many years to develop. This means that those suffering from asbestos disease now likely had their first exposure to asbestos as long as 15 or 20 years ago, or more. Inhaling dust and asbestos fibers as a result from applying and maintaining asbestos materials, placed many workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at Buffalo’s Marine Midland Center. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once construction or maintenance at the Marine Midland Center and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Marine Midland Plaza – Rochester, New York

Marine Midland Plaza is a twenty-one story office building located on Chestnut Street in Rochester, New York. Completed in 1970, the building is the sixth tallest building in Rochester, and it houses commercial offices. In 1999, Marine Midland Plaza was renamed HSBC Plaza. Asbestos containing drywall joint compound or mud, ceiling tiles and fireproof insulation were utilized during the construction of Marine Midland Plaza. Workers who handled these materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was used as a filler material in drywall joint compound because it prevented the compound from cracking when it dried. This material was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste.

During the construction of Marine Midland Plaza, workers applied three coats of asbestos-containing dry mix joint compound to the seams between sheets of drywall. After one coat of joint compound dried, it was sanded before the next coat was applied. During both the mixing and sanding processes of asbestos-containing joint compound, dust and fibers were released into the air, putting not only laborers at risk for exposure, but others who worked in the surrounding vicinity.

Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles were also installed at Marine Midland Plaza. Simply handling ceiling tiles emitted asbestos-containing dust. Workers cut ceiling tiles to allow for lighting, ventilation, sprinkler heads or irregular wall shapes. Cutting ceiling tiles released asbestos dust into the air.

Fireproofers applied asbestos-containing fireproof insulation to the structural steel and decks at Marine Midland Plaza. This insulation was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was packaged in heavy paper bags. The dry mix was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel surfaces. Pouring, mixing and spraying fireproof insulation created clouds of asbestos-containing dust. Construction trades, including electricians, pipefitters, and carpenters routinely disturbed the fireproof insulation in order to gain access to the structural steel. Disturbing fireproof insulation also emitted asbestos dust and fibers.

Various contractors throughout Western New York employed many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects, such as Marine Midland Plaza. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Marine Midland Plaza and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Martisco

Martisco Corporation was founded in 1958 by James Bugdon and Hopkins Jenkins. Located in Liverpool, New York, it is a distributor of plumbing supplies. Martisco was the authorized distributor in the Syracuse area for Johns-Manville’s transite asbestos cement pipe. Contractors and local municipalities purchased transite pipe from Martisco for use in roof drains, furnace flues, water pipes, utility lines, sanitary sewer drains and HVAC ducts. Workers who handled and cut transite asbestos cement pipe are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Transite asbestos cement pipe is a mixture of cement and asbestos fibers. It was manufactured in thirteen-foot lengths. Asbestos was incorporated into transite pipes because of its inherent strength and resistance to heat. Workers used hand saws, gas-powered disc saws or electric masonry saws to cut transite pipe. Asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne when the pipe was cut.

Inhaling dust and particles from cutting or applying asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even individuals who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Martisco or utilized transite pipe, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Maryvale High School

In 1955, Maryvale High School was established as a public high school serving the Maryvale Union Free School District. Located on Maryvale Drive, the high school serves the Maryvale neighborhood in Cheektowaga, New York. Maryvale High School offers a full Regents curriculum, enrolling over 800 students every year.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized during construction and maintenance procedures at Maryvale High School, including block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and fireproof insulation. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Maryvale High School’s heat was produced by steam boilers. Steam was delivered to radiators through a system of pipes, valves and pumps. Asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement covered the heating system’s equipment. Workers removed the worn asbestos-containing insulation in order to perform maintenance or repair procedures. When these procedures were complete, new insulation was applied. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials emitted asbestos fibers and dust into the air, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos-containing fireproofing was applied to the high school’s structural steel in order to protect it from potential fire damage. Fireproof insulation, which was packaged in bags, was dumped into a machine, mixed with water, and sprayed onto the steel using a hose. The fireproofing process caused clouds of asbestos-containing dust to become airborne. Additionally tradesmen, such as pipefitters or carpenters, disturbed the fireproof insulation in order to install pipes, framing studs or other equipment. When the fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos fibers were released into the air.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a mesothelioma diagnosis. If you were once a laborer or maintenance worker who worked at Maryvale High School in Cheektowaga, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Merck & Company

Merck & Company is one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. Merck was founded in 1668 by the Merck family and was nationalized by the United States government in 1917, during World War I. Merck is most known for being the first pharmaceutical company to manufacture morphine. In 1953, Merck merged with Sharpe & Dohme Inc., a pharmaceutical company in Philadelphia. This merger made Merck & Co the largest pharmaceutical company in the United States, and it has since established numerous offices and factories in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and other states throughout the country. Merck publishes Merck

Manual – a medical reference book and has a total equity of over $48.6 billion dollars. As of 2013, Merck employs roughly 76,000 employees in 120 countries. To date, there are 31 Merck factories worldwide.

In the 1950s, the communities of Danville and Riverside, Pennsylvania, merged after Merck & Co. agreed that it would treat the community’s sewage if the pharmaceutical could build its plant near the Susquehanna River, located in-between these two boroughs. The communities agreed, and the Danville-Riverside Merck plant was built in 1950. It became commonly referred to as the Cherokee plant. Asbestos-containing materials, such as cement pipes, were used during the construction of the Merck Danville-Riverside plant. Asbestos containing cement pipes, known as Bondstrand, were used to carry waste materials. These pipes were roughly 40 feet long with a twelve inch diameter. Workers used power tools to cut the asbestos pipes, which led to the inhalation of harmful asbestos dust and fibers. Inhaling dust and particles from asbestos put workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Many laborers who worked on construction projects for Merck in Danville-Riverside, Pennsylvania, may have been exposed to asbestos and could be at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one were once employed at Merck & Co in Danville-Riverside, Pennsylvania, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Mercy Hospital

The Sisters of Mercy, an order of Catholic nuns, founded Mercy Hospital in 1904. Located on Abbott Street in South Buffalo, it is one of Western New York’s largest and busiest hospitals. As demand for Mercy Hospital’s services have increased throughout the years, the hospital has completed numerous expansions and renovations.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos could be found as a component of insulation and building materials, including joint compound (mud), pipe covering and fireproofing materials. These materials were used during construction of Mercy Hospital. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel at Mercy Hospital in order to protect the steel from fire damage and high heat temperatures. Asbestos was incorporated into fireproofing because of its fire resistant qualities and relatively low cost. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mix, which was typically packaged in one hundred pound bags. Raw fireproofing material was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto steel surfaces with a hose.

During the mixing and application processes, an enormous amount of asbestos-containing dust and fibers were emitted into the work area. Laborers who worked in the vicinity of the application of fireproofing may have also inhaled asbestos dust and fibers. Additionally, tradesmen, such as pipefitters, electricians, ironworkers and carpenters routinely disturbed the fireproofing after it was installed in order to install pipes, conduits, wall framing, ventilation ducts and other building materials.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering, mastic, cement, and floor and ceiling tiles were also used during the initial construction and renovations at Mercy Hospital. Laborers and tradesmen hired to apply, remove or work in the vicinity of asbestos-containing building materials may have been exposed to asbestos dust. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Mercy Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Mercy Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center

The Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center was originally established in 1916 as the New York City Reformatory at New Hampton (also known as New Hampton Farms). The facility was built in order to replace the New York City Reformatory on Hart Island. The facility in New Hampton used agricultural, forestry and construction programs to rehabilitate juvenile delinquents. Inmates participated in constructing the many buildings that occupied over 800 acres of land, and they also raised crops in order to feed inmates at other New York City penal institutions. By the 1930s, the reformatory began to resemble a small city with dairy and animal farms, vegetable gardens, water purification system, sewage disposal, power house, bunk houses and recreational facilities.

All the buildings and farms were maintained by inmates under custodial and civilian supervision. In 1946, the State took possession of one of the buildings known as Cubicle Building No. 1. The reformatory program had deteriorated, and the State began to recognize that the facility did not offer adequate treatment programs for its inmates. In 1958, the New York Department of Corrections released the entire facility to New York State, and by the 1970s, it was converted to a forensic psychiatric hospital, which replaced the Matteawan Asylum in Fishkill. In 2012, the State Office of Mental Health announced its planned closure of the Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center by 2017. Today, Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center is a secure adult psychiatric center with 278 beds, and it houses and treats people deemed both mentally ill and too violent for society. It is the largest forensic facility in New York State.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of materials used in the construction and maintenance of Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center. Pipe covering, insulating cement, gaskets and packing material contained asbestos. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases.

If you or a loved one worked construction or maintenance at Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center in New Hampton, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Midtown Tower and Plaza

The Midtown Tower and Plaza was a shopping and office complex located on nearly nine acres of land at Clinton Square, between Main and Broad Streets in Rochester, New York. Originally opened in 1962, Midtown Plaza was the first urban indoor shopping mall in the world. Midtown Tower, which was attached to the mall, was a seventeen-story building that contained offices, retail space, a restaurant and a hotel. Over the years, stores at the mall found it more difficult to remain profitable. By the late 1990s, most of the mall was vacant. Midtown Plaza closed in 2008, and in 2009, it was demolished. After several years of sitting vacant, Midtown Tower is scheduled for a total renovation, which will include new condominiums, offices and retail space.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance at Midtown Tower and Plaza in Rochester, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos related diseases. If you or a loved one once worked construction or maintenance at Midtown Tower and Plaza, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Millard Fillmore Hospital

Millard Fillmore Hospital was founded in 1872, as the Buffalo Homeopathic Hospital. Originally located on Washington Street in Buffalo, New York, the hospital moved to a house on Cottage Street in 1874 in order to expand the number of patients it could treat. In 1911, a modern facility was constructed for the hospital on Gates Circle. In the early Twentieth Century, advancements in modern medicine swayed public opinion against homeopathy. In 1923, the hospital’s name was changed to Millard Fillmore Hospital, and it began to hire trained medical doctors. During the next several decades, Millard Fillmore Hospital completed several expansions, developing a reputation as a center of innovation in the medical field.

In 1960, surgeons at Millard Fillmore Hospital were the first in the United States to successfully implant a cardiac pacemaker. Prior to closing its doors in 2012, Millard Fillmore Hospital was a 189 bed facility that offered medical services for emergencies, cardiology, neurology and vascular medicine. Since it closed, its hospital services have moved to Gates Vascular Institute and Buffalo General Medical Center. Demolition of the former Millard Fillmore Hospital is expected to take place in the fall of 2015.

Up until the late 1970s, laborers utilized asbestos-containing materials during the hospital’s initial construction and in maintenance procedures. Laborers removed and applied asbestos-containing joint compound, pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation, gaskets and fireproof insulation. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing ready-mix joint compound (mud) was used during construction and renovations at Millard Fillmore Hospital. Joint compound was applied over drywall tape seams and between sheets of drywall. After one layer of joint compound dried, workers sanded the joint compound to a smooth surface and another layer of joint compound was applied. Sanding joint compound caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Millard Fillmore Hospital was heated by steam produced in boilers. A network of pipes delivered steam to radiators throughout the hospital. Boilers, pipes, valves and pumps within the heating system were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. When workers performed repairs, the insulation was removed. New insulation was applied after the repair procedures were completed. When asbestos-containing insulation was removed and applied, asbestos fibers were released into the air. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized throughout the heating system at Millard Fillmore Hospital. Gaskets ensured a tight seal between pipe flanges and other equipment, such as boilers, pumps and valves. Gaskets were frequently removed and replaced during maintenance procedures. When a gasket was replaced, it was scraped off the flange. The gasket replacement process emitted asbestos dust into the air.

Fireproofers applied asbestos-containing fireproof insulation to the structural steel throughout Millard Fillmore Hospital. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mixture of asbestos, cement and linen, and it was packaged in heavy paper bags. During the fireproofing process, workers dumped bags of fireproof insulation into a machine, where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. Mixing and applying fireproof insulation created large clouds of asbestos-containing dust that remained airborne for days. Additionally, tradesmen disturbed fireproof insulation after it was applied in order to install pipes, ventilation equipment or framing studs. When fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos fibers were emitted in close proximity to the workers.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Millard Fillmore Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of Millard Fillmore Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Milliken Power Station

The Milliken Power Station was a coal-fired power plant located on Cayuga Lake in the town of Lansing, New York. The station, operated by New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG), was built in the mid-1950’s and was responsible for supplying electricity to a significant portion of Central New York. In 1999, the station was placed under new ownership and renamed “AES Cayuga.” In April 2011, AES Corporation shut down the Cayuga station.

Laborers who once worked at NYSEG’s Milliken Station have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Those employed at Milliken were routinely exposed to materials that contained asbestos. Asbestos insulation lined steam pipes, boilers, pumps, turbine generators and other equipment throughout the facility.

In order to produce power, Milliken Station was dependent on the use of coal-fired boilers and turbines. The boilers and turbines located throughout Milliken were once covered in asbestos-containing thermal block insulation. Laborers at Milliken regularly came into contact with not only block insulation, but also asbestos-containing cement, pipe covering, gaskets and packing materials. As a result of their exposure to asbestos-containing materials, numerous NYSEG workers developed and died of mesothelioma and other debilitating respiratory conditions.

Aside from its power-generating boilers and turbines, the Milliken facility contained a system of steam pipes and pumps, which required regular and frequent maintenance. Pump operators were responsible for replacing asbestos-containing gaskets within the flanges of Milliken’s pipe systems. Asbestos gaskets were used because of their ability to withstand high temperatures. Depending on the condition of the gasket in need of replacement, a pump operator typically scraped and pried the gasket from its flange. This process caused asbestos dust to become airborne, and it was also released into the working area of employees who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing materials.

Roughly once a year, the Milliken facility went into a maintenance period called a “shutdown.” This shutdown lasted for approximately five to twelve weeks, and workers performed maintenance work on boilers, turbines, pumps and pipes. Insulation contractors, or journeymen, removed worn asbestos insulation from steam pipes and flat surfaces by sawing or by using tools such as claw hammers. When the worn insulation was removed, new asbestos insulation was applied to pipes, boilers, turbines and other equipment. Removing and installing asbestos insulation created large clouds of asbestos-containing dust, which workers inhaled without knowing the health risks.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at a NYSEG facility and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Mobil Oil Refinery

When in operation, The Elk Street Mobil Oil refinery in Buffalo, New York, was one of only seven Mobil Oil refineries in the nation. The facility, which was taken out of operation in 1981, sprawled over five city blocks and had the capability to refine 43,000 barrels of oil per day. Throughout its operation, the Elk Street refinery employed dozens of workers, including electricians, millwrights, yardmen, maintenance personnel, journeymen and pump operators. Asbestos was used extensively throughout the facility and, as a result, many former workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is caused by exposure to asbestos.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the early 1970s, asbestos could be found in materials, such as pipe covering, gaskets, thermal insulation and packing material. Miles of pipelines were covered with asbestos insulation. These same pipe lines that ran through the facilities storage tanks, outdoor furnaces and maintenance shops were also comprised of asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material. Asbestos gaskets were primarily used because of their durability and ability to withstand acid both in the facilities pipelines and tanks. Asbestos-containing packing material was also utilized in the pumps to ensure they would not leak the high temperature liquids and acids that they contained.

There were periods of time when journeymen were hired to come to the Elk Street facility in order to perform routine maintenance work. During this time, worn asbestos insulation that covered pipes and boilers was torn-down, and workers assisted with dismantling and replacing the asbestos insulation. This process was extremely messy and created enormous dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at the Mobil Oil Refinery in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Monro Muffler Brake, Inc.

Monro Muffler Brake Inc., was founded in Rochester, New York, in 1957 by Charles

  1. August. Initially, Monro was a franchise of another automotive service company, Midas Muffler. As service needs evolved, Mr. August expanded his business to include brake repair and other automotive services. In 1966, Mr. August ended his

franchise agreement with Midas and launched Monro Muffler with his brother, Burton S. August, and Sheldon Lane. The company was formed as a small chain of automotive service stores, and it was named after Monroe County in Rochester, New York. By the late 1970s, the Monro chain included twenty stores. By 1984, the company operated 59 stores mostly throughout upstate New York. In 1991, Monro went public and began trading on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol MNRO. Today, Monro Muffler operates over 1,000 stores throughout 24 states, and its corporate headquarters are currently located in Rochester, New York.

Monro Muffler provides an array of automotive services, including brake repair and maintenance, muffler and exhaust systems, tune-ups, inspection services and tire replacement. Up until the 1990s, most passenger car and truck brake linings contained high concentrations of chrysotile asbestos, a carcinogenic fiber that is potentially deadly when inhaled. Because brake pads, linings and shoes wear out and require frequent replacement, mechanics who replaced and repaired braking systems on motor vehicles are put at risk of developing mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. During each process of the brake pad or brake lining replacement process, asbestos fibers are released. Experts consider sanding and bench grinding of asbestos-containing brake linings to be the most significant source of asbestos exposure during the brake replacement process. Asbestos dust created from sanding and grinding brake parts has been known to linger in the air of a workspace for up to three to four days after the completion of replacement brake work.

Asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma and lung cancer, have become more common among brake and auto mechanics. Significant exposure to asbestos occurred during the repair and maintenance of asbestos-containing brake pads and linings, clutch facings and gaskets. Even those who worked in an auto shop, where others were performing brake work, could have been exposed to harmful asbestos dust and fibers. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease as a result of your exposure working with brakes or in an auto shop, contact us regarding your legal rights.

Monroe Community College

Monroe Community College was established in 1961, as part of the State University of New York system. The college was originally located at the former East High School building in Rochester, New York, but in 1968, a new campus was constructed on East Henrietta Road in Brighton, to accommodate the rapidly increasing number of enrolled students. The Brighton campus currently consists of twenty-six buildings that include classrooms, laboratories, administrative offices, dormitories and athletic facilities. Monroe Community College’s current enrollment is approximately 20,000 students per semester. In recent years, laborers who assisted in the construction of buildings at Monroe Community College have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. During the construction of the Brighton campus, workers applied and removed asbestos-containing materials throughout the campus, including fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation and joint compound. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

During the construction of buildings at the Brighton campus, asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was sprayed on the structural steel. This material was manufactured as a dry mixture of asbestos, cement and waste from linen mills. Fireproof insulation was packaged in bags, dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel. Mixing and spraying the insulation produced clouds of asbestos-containing dust. In order to gain access to the structural steel, electricians, pipefitters, carpenters, sheet metal workers and other tradesmen routinely disturbed the insulation after it was applied. When workers disturbed fireproof insulation, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement were applied to steam and water pipes throughout the Brighton campus. Handling or cutting lengths of pipe covering emitted asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. Asbestos insulating cement was used to cover pipe elbows. Insulating cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the insulating cement caused asbestos-containing dust and fibers to become airborne. Boilers used to heat buildings on the campus were covered with asbestos block insulation. Similar to pipe covering, workers cut block insulation with hand saws to accommodate rounded or irregular parts of the boilers. Cutting block insulation also emitted asbestos fibers and dust.

Dry-mix asbestos-containing joint compound was also utilized in the construction of many buildings at Monroe Community College. Joint compound or mud, was used to seal seams between sheets of drywall. It was manufactured as a dry powder and mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing joint compound caused asbestos dust to become airborne. Several coats of joint compound were applied to the seams between each piece of drywall. After one coat of joint compound dried, it was sanded before the next coat was applied. Sanding joint compound also emitted asbestos dust and fibers.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related disease. Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Monroe Community College’s Brighton campus were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Monroe Community College and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Monroe Plastics

Monroe Plastics was founded in March 1970, as a wholly owned subsidiary of Chicago Molded Products Corp. The Monroe Plastics plant was located in the Albia Industrial Park on Highway 5 South in Albia, Iowa. When the plant opened, its building was roughly 13,600 square feet

and contained five compression mold presses connected to a central hydraulic and steam system. The Albia plant manufactured plastic parts for the automotive, aerospace and household appliance industries. During the 1970s, the Monroe Plastics plant in Albia was considered to be one of the most modern plastic molding facilities in the United States. Throughout its years of operation, Monroe Plastics expanded its manufacturing facility by constructing an adjoining 39,000 square foot building and adding additional mold presses. At its peak in 1979, Monroe Plastics employed 120 people and expanded its operations to include transfer and injection molding capabilities. Monroe Plastics closed its doors in July 1981.

Up until the mid-1980s, asbestos could be found as a component of many plastic molding compounds. Monroe Plastics used phenolic plastic molding compounds that contained raw asbestos fibers in the manufacture of many finished plastic parts. The companies that manufactured these asbestos plastic molding compounds knew about the health hazards of asbestos, but they did not warn Monroe Plastics or its employees. Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Molders, finishers and other laborers at Monroe Plastics were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process of automotive and aerospace parts, electrical equipment and other plastic parts used in a variety of household products.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products used at Monroe Plastics. Our firm is located ten miles from a major manufacturer of asbestos-containing molding compounds, which sold its product directly to Monroe Plastics in Albia, Iowa. Our attorneys are also familiar with the other companies that manufactured and distributed asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds to Monroe Plastics.

If you or a loved one were once employed at Monroe Plastics in Albia, Iowa, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

MONY Plaza

Located on Madison Street in Syracuse, New York, MONY Plaza is a two-building commercial office complex. MONY Tower I, also known as AXA Tower I, was constructed in 1965, as offices for the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York (MONY). After AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company’s 2004 acquisition of MONY, the building is now occupied by AXA. MONY Tower II, also known as Carrier Tower or AXA Tower II, was constructed in 1973. Tower II was the corporate headquarters for Carrier Corporation until United Technologies Corporation acquired Carrier in 1979. Both buildings are 19 stories high, and they are the second-tallest buildings in Syracuse.

Workers utilized asbestos-containing fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation during construction, maintenance and repair procedures at MONY Plaza. Workers who applied, removed or maintained asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel of the buildings at MONY Plaza in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Fireproofing was packaged in heavy paper bags, and it contained a mixture of asbestos, cement and waste linens. Fireproofing material was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel using a hose. Mixing and spraying fireproof insulation emitted clouds of asbestos dust and fibers into the air. Electricians and pipefitters typically disturbed the fireproofing after it was applied in order to install conduit or pipes. When fireproofing material was disturbed, asbestos dust was emitted, which workers inhaled.

Hot water radiators delivered heat to the buildings at MONY Plaza. Boilers in the sub-basement of Tower I produced steam, which was pumped into a heat exchanger in order to heat water, for use in radiators. When the water reached a desired temperature, it was delivered to radiators through a network of pipes. Boilers, pipes, valves and pumps within the boiler system were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. When maintenance or repairs were required, the asbestos-containing insulation was removed. When these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. Removing and applying asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on the construction and maintenance of MONY Plaza were employed by various contractors throughout Central New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction of the MONY Plaza and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

National Fuel Garage

The Buffalo Gas Light Company was located at 249 West Genesee Street in Buffalo, New York. The Buffalo Gas Light Company began manufacturing illuminating gas from coal in 1848. The Historic Romanesque façade was designed by architect John H. Selkirk and built in 1859. The National Fuel Garage was an auto mechanic shop on site at the Buffalo Gas Light Company. The Buffalo Gas Light Company was acquired by The National Fuel Gas Company in the early 1900s. The National Fuel Gas Company demolished its garage in 2000, but it preserved the façade and incorporated it into the headquarters of HealthNow New York. Helpers, garage men and mechanics working for National Fuel may have unknowingly been exposed to asbestos up until the late 1970s.

The National Fuel Garage provided an array of automotive services, including brake repair and maintenance, tire replacement, tune-ups, inspections and electrical work. Up until the 1990s, most passenger car and truck brake linings contained high concentrations of chrysotile asbestos, a carcinogenic fiber that is potentially deadly when inhaled. Because brake pads, linings and shoes wear out and require frequent replacement, mechanics who replaced and repaired braking systems on motor vehicles are put at risk of developing mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. During each process of the brake pad or brake lining replacement process, asbestos fibers are released. Experts consider sanding and bench grinding of asbestos-containing brake linings to be the most significant source of asbestos exposure during the brake replacement process. Asbestos dust created from sanding and grinding brake parts has been known to linger in the air of a workspace for up to three to four days after the completion of replacement brake work.

Asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma and lung cancer, have become more common among brake and auto mechanics. Significant exposure to asbestos occurred during the repair and maintenance of asbestos-containing brake pads and linings, clutch facings and gaskets. If you or a loved one has been exposed to mesothelioma or another asbestos related disease, contact us regarding your legal rights.

National Gypsum

In 1926, the first mining and manufacturing plant of National Gypsum was established in Clarence, New York. The discovery of an almost pure gypsum deposit in Clarence Center prompted National Gypsum to begin gypsum mining and manufacturing operations for its wallboard and plaster products. A Buffalo, New York, inventor by the name of Joseph F. Haggerty developed a new process for the manufacture of wallboard, which created a lighter and more flexible product. The carefully patented new gypsum wallboard product later became known as Gold Bond, after its certificate of guarantee, which was included with every shipment. National Gypsum also manufactured gypsum lath and plaster, ceiling tiles and heating applications. The Clarence, New York, mine ceased its operations in the 1970s, and the manufacturing facility was successful until it shut its doors in 1982.

Asbestos-containing materials and products were not absent from National Gypsum’s product line or its manufacturing facility. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, National Gypsum incorporated raw asbestos into its wallboard products. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer. The production of asbestos-containing wallboard incorporated raw asbestos and crushed gypsum (calcium sulfate). Water was added to the minerals and a slurry formed, which was sandwiched between two pieces of paper. The wallboard was then dried in a kiln and shipped. Asbestos was incorporated into the wallboard product to create a sturdy fireproof material. Workers inhaled asbestos fibers when they mixed the slurry and cut the plasterboard to size.

In the 1970s, National Gypsum’s Clarence, New York, plant began to manufacture Panel Electric, a product used for heat applications. This new product was used to heat walls, and it was used in general heating applications. Asbestos-containing plasterboard was grooved, and electrical wires were inserted and covered with plaster. Panel Electric was intended for set-up behind a wall for its use as a heat source. During Panel Electric’s manufacturing process, workers were exposed to asbestos when they cut and scored the asbestos-containing plasterboard.

Asbestos was also used in the maintenance and upkeep of National Gypsum’s manufacturing facility. From the calcine building to the kiln facility, to the rock dryer building and powerhouse, asbestos was incorporated into gaskets, packing material for pumps and in the insulation that covered boilers and pipes. Hot water and steam pipes were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe insulation. Boilers were insulted with asbestos block and cement. Pumps and valves were sealed with asbestos gaskets and rope packing. Of course, any individual exposure to any one of these products varied based upon a worker’s years of service and their proximity to the asbestos-containing materials.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, represents former workers and retirees from National Gypsum. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at National Gypsum and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Nestle

In 1900, Nestlé founded its plant in Fulton, New York, which was also the first Nestlé plant to open in the United States. The Fulton plant initially produced Nestlé milk foods, but in 1909, the company expanded its operations and chocolate production began. In 1935, researchers at the Fulton plant developed the first cocoa mix, also known as Nestlé Quik, and two years later, the Fulton plant became the birthplace of the popular Crunch bar.

The Fulton plant contained numerous buildings, including the condensery, the cocoa pressing building, and the confections molding and packaging facility. Steam was used during the production of a variety of Nestlé products. Asbestos-containing materials insulated a wide variety of equipment at the plant, including pipes, boilers, duct work and turbines. As a result of asbestos exposure at Nestlé’s Fulton plant, many workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is caused by exposure to asbestos.

Maintenance work was regularly performed on equipment located throughout the Nestlé plant. Numerous steam pipes ran throughout the buildings, and the asbestos insulation that covered these pipes required frequent replacement. Workers responsible for this type of maintenance created asbestos-containing dust by scraping and prying at asbestos materials. This process was extremely messy, and created dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

In 2003, after more than one hundred years in Fulton, Nestlé closed its plant. Since the closing of the plant, investors from Côte d’Ivoire have purchased the old chocolate factory and are currently attempting to reopen it as New York Chocolate and Confections Company.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, represents former workers and retirees, as well as their families, from the former Nestlé plant in Fulton, New York. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Nestlé plant, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

New Venture Gear

New Venture Gear, also known as New Process Gear, was a large automobile parts manufacturing facility in Syracuse, New York. Established in 1886 as a leather tannery, New Venture Gear manufactured automotive transmissions and transfer cases as the automobile grew in popularity during the early 1900s. The Chrysler Corporation purchased the plant in 1955, and incorporated it into its vast operations up until 1990. The plant served a unique niche within Chrysler’s operations, and beginning in the 1970s, New Venture Gear also manufactured parts for a variety of auto manufacturers. By 1977, only twenty percent of its production went to Chrysler cars and trucks. Through a series of merged ventures and partnerships, followed by company restructuring, New Venture Gear was eventually purchased by Magna International, a large Canadian auto parts manufacturer. In March 2009, Magna announced that it would shut down the Syracuse plant, leaving 1,400 workers unemployed.

New Venture Gear was in the business of building driveline systems and component parts, including manual transmissions, manual transaxles, gears, transfer cases and other motor vehicle parts for GM and Chrysler. The production of these auto parts required intense heat to melt and, sometimes, harden the materials. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the early 1970s, asbestos was used to insulate sections of the New Venture Gear plant, including steam pipes, vestibule doors on carburizing furnaces and surface combustion furnaces. Asbestos was also used in gaskets, cement, packing and rope material.

Laborers who worked at New Venture Gear were constantly exposed to asbestos dust from working with and in the vicinity of individuals who repaired and maintained asbestos insulation on pipes, heat treat equipment and boilers. In the initial assembly and maintenance of this system, asbestos-containing gaskets and rope asbestos packing was widely used causing the airborne release of asbestos when the materials were cut during new installation or when they were removed by scraping, grinding or wire brushing.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, represents former workers and retirees, as well as their families, from the former New Venture Gear/New Process Gear plant in Syracuse, New York. In the process of representing these workers and their families the attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at the New Venture Gear/New Process Gear plant, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

New York Air Brake

In 1876, Frederick Eames established the Eames Vacuum Brake Company on Beebee Island in Watertown, New York. Eames Vacuum Brake manufactured vacuum braking systems for railroad engines and cars. In 1890, the company was reorganized in order to manufacture railroad air brakes, and it was renamed the New York Air Brake Company. Due to increased demand for its air brakes, New York Air Brake relocated its operations in 1902 to a much larger ten-building, seventy-acre facility on the corner of Starbuck Avenue and Pearl Street in Watertown. During World War I and World War II, the company manufactured artillery shells, gun carriages and tank hulls. In 1967, New York Air Brake merged with the General Signal Corporation, and in 1991, it was acquired by German air brake manufacturer Knorr-Bremse AG. The company is still in operation, and it currently employs around 400 people.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into materials used during maintenance and repairs at New York Air Brake. Pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation, gaskets and packing material contained asbestos. Employees and contractors who worked at New York Air Brake were at risk for asbestos exposure. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

In order to heat the buildings and to operate production equipment at New York Air Brake, a network of pipes delivered steam throughout the plant. Boilers, pipes and valves within the steam system were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. During maintenance procedures, workers removed asbestos-containing insulation from equipment within the steam system. After the repairs were completed, new insulation was applied. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

Workers who performed maintenance or repairs on pumps or valves frequently removed and replaced asbestos-containing packing material and gaskets. In order to prevent leaks, packing material was wrapped around valve stems and pump shafts. Workers at New York Air Brake also scraped asbestos-containing gaskets from flanges on pumps and valves during repair procedures. New gaskets were fabricated from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. When asbestos-containing packing material and gaskets were removed, cut or handled, asbestos fibers were emitted. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at New York Air Brake in Watertown, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

New York State Capitol Building

Constructed over a period of 32 years between 1867 and 1899, the New York State Capitol Building was the most expensive government building of its time, with a total construction cost of $25 million at its completion. Located between Washington and State Streets in Albany, New York, the State Capitol Building houses the chambers of the New York State Assembly and Senate, offices for senior legislative officials and the primary office of the Governor of New York. The construction of the Capitol was overseen by five different architects, including H.H. Richardson, who previously designed the Buffalo State Hospital. The New York State Capitol Building was listed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1971, and in 1979, it was designated a National Historic Landmark. A lengthy renovation of the Capitol Building began in 2000, in order to upgrade antiquated utilities and preserve its unique architectural design.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were commonly used in construction and maintenance of the New York State Capitol Building. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement were applied to steam and hot water pipes throughout the New York State Capitol. Handling or cutting lengths of pipe covering emitted asbestos-containing dust and fibers into the air. Pipe elbows and valves required insulating cement because of their irregular shape. Insulating cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the asbestos-containing cement emitted asbestos fibers and dust into the air. Due to wear and tear on some of the pipes, asbestos-containing pipe covering required repair and maintenance. Worn asbestos insulation was dismantled and replaced. Removing and replacing asbestos containing pipe covering was an extremely dusty process and created enormous dust clouds.

Asbestos-containing joint compound was also utilized during renovations of the Capitol Building. Joint compound (mud) was applied to seams and joints over drywall tape. After the compound dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface. During both the mixing process of asbestos joint compound and sanding process, dust and fibers were released into the air putting not only plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the same vicinity.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at the New York State Capitol Building and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Niagara Mohawk

In recent years, utility workers involved in the operation and maintenance of Niagara Mohawk Corporation powerhouses, now National Grid, have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos- related diseases. Laborers who worked in the utility industry were at high risk for exposure to asbestos-con-

taining products. Asbestos insulation lined steam pipes, boilers, pumps, turbine generators and other equipment throughout Niagara Mohawk powerhouses and substations.

Prior to the mid-1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized as efficient insulation for intensely heated equipment, such as pipes, boilers and turbines. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos insulation and other materials placed employees at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The Niagara Mohawk Corporation owned and maintained many powerhouses and utility substations throughout New York State. The Huntley and Dunkirk stations were once considered to be the largest steam generator plants in New York. Asbestos was used extensively in the utility industry as insulation for high-heat temperature equipment, including turbines, large boilers, pumps, steam lines and valves. As a result of asbestos exposure at the Niagara Mohawk utility stations, many workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

Asbestos insulation literally covered every piece of equipment at the Dunkirk and Huntley Stations. These coal fired plants contained miles of steam pipe lines that were lined with asbestos insulation. Asbestos could also be found in gaskets and in the block insulation that covered boilers and turbines. Asbestos gaskets were used because of their durability and ability to withstand high heat temperatures.

There were periods of time where Niagara Mohawk stations shut-down, so that workers could perform maintenance on the aging equipment. During this time, worn asbestos insulation that covered pipes was torn-down, and workers assisted with dismantling and replacing the asbestos insulation. This process was extremely messy and would create enormous dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at Niagara Mohawk power stations. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at a Niagara Mohawk power station and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Niagara University enrolls approximately 4,200 students annually.

Niagara University was founded as the College and Seminary of Our Lady of Angels in 1856 by the Vincentian Community, a Roman Catholic religious order. In 1883, the university changed its name to Niagara University as more secular areas of study were offered. Located on Lewiston Road in Niagara Falls, New York, Niagara University’s campus consists of thirty buildings on 160 acres overlooking the Niagara River gorge. The university offers bachelor’s and graduate degrees in over fifty subject areas, and it

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were used during the construction of Niagara University. Pipe covering, block insulation, refractory material, asbestos rope, insulating cement and fireproof insulation contained asbestos. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Boilers at Niagara University produced steam in order to heat campus buildings. Steam was delivered to the buildings through an underground network of pipes that were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering. Valves, pumps and pipe elbows within the steam system were covered with asbestos-containing insulating cement. Additionally, asbestos rope provided an adequate seal on maintenance access doors on steam boilers. When workers accessed the interior of a boiler, the asbestos rope was removed and replaced with new rope. The interiors of the boilers were also lined with asbestos-containing refractory material, which protected the firebricks inside the boiler from heat damage. During regular maintenance, worn refractory material was removed and replaced. When asbestos-containing refractory materials, pipe covering and insulating cement were removed and reapplied, asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled.

During the construction of numerous buildings on the Niagara University campus, asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was sprayed onto the buildings structural steel. Fireproof insulation was a dry mixture of cement, linen and asbestos. Workers poured bags of fireproof insulation into a machine, where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel with a hose. The fireproofing application process produced clouds of asbestos-containing dust. Additionally, tradesmen disturbed the fireproof insulation after it was applied in order to hang pipes, ventilation ducts or electrical conduits from the structural steel. When the fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos-containing dust and fibers became airborne. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction and renovation projects at Niagara University were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Niagara University and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Nicholson & Hall Boiler & Welding Corporation

In 1922, Lance Nicholson and Thomas Hall founded the Nicholson & Hall Boiler & Welding Corporation in what is now called the Cobblestone District of Buffalo, New York. With easy access to the Buffalo harbor, Nicholson & Hall originally serviced boilers onboard Great Lakes steamships. With the loss of shipping traffic into Buffalo Harbor due to the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway in 1959, Nicholson & Hall gradually shifted its focus to landbased boiler construction and repair in power plants and industrial sites. At its peak, the company employed around 300 boilermakers and other tradesmen, and its shop was located at 41 Columbia Street in Buffalo, New York. In 2013, Nicholson & Hall permanently ceased operations, yet its building has been renovated to accommodate office spaces.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing insulating materials were utilized aboard ships, in power plants and at industrial sites. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Laborers who worked for Nicholson & Hall repaired and maintained boilers and associated equipment at numerous industrial sites throughout Western New York, including Niagara Mohawk’s Huntley and Dunkirk stations. Ships, power plants and industrial sites were primarily powered by steam produced in boilers. Pipes within the steam system were covered with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos block insulation covered steam boilers. During maintenance to the steam system, workers removed worn asbestos insulation. New asbestos insulation was applied after the maintenance or repair procedures were completed. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation released asbestos dust into the air, which workers inhaled.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed by Nicholson & Hall and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

 

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Power Plant

Construction on Niagara Mohawk’s Nine Mile Point nuclear power plant began in 1965, and it went into commercial operation in December, 1969. Nine Mile Point’s plant shares a 900 acre site with the Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant, and it is located about five miles northeast of Oswego, New York on the shore of Lake Ontario. Nine Mile Point contains two nuclear reactors, Unit 1 and Unit 2. Both reactors at the Nine Mile Point facility are classified as Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) utilizing water from Lake Ontario for the cooling process. Unit 1 is one of the two oldest nuclear reactors that remain in service in the United States. In 2001, Nine Mile Point was sold to Constellation Energy and it remains in service, it is now run by Exelon.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the early 1970s, asbestos could be found in materials, such as pipe covering, gaskets, thermal insulation and packing material used in pumps and valves. Commonly, powerhouses, steam generating facilities and nuclear power plants used asbestos in their construction due to its high heat resiliency. As a result of asbestos exposure at Nine Mile Point, workers may have developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at Nine Mile Point Nuclear Power Plant and have been diagnosed with an asbestos related disease such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Norton Labs

Norton Laboratories, Inc., also known as Norton Labs, was founded in 1916 by Charles Norton and William Seigle on Mill Street in Lockport, NY. The Lockport, New York, plant initially consisted of seven buildings, including a factory, boiler room, factory office, front office, machine shop and two warehouses. Norton Labs originally manufactured metallic magnesium during World War I and later expanded its product line to include molded plastic handles for pots and pans, camera parts, automotive parts and circuit boards. In 1958, Norton Labs was acquired by Auburn Plastics, which was based in Auburn, New York. The company operated as a division under Auburn Plastics and continued to manufacture its products under the Norton Labs name. In 1971, Norton Labs moved its plant to a single building located across the street from its former site. In 1981, Norton Labs closed.

Individuals who worked at Norton Labs in Lockport have recently developed and died of mesothelioma as a result of their exposure to asbestos. Up until the late 1970s, asbestos could be found as a component of high heat temperature, raw, plastic materials. Norton Labs incorporated raw asbestos fibers into its phenolic resins used in manufacturing parts for a variety of companies, including General Electric, Harrison Radiator and Kodak. Additionally, asbestos was incorporated into insulating materials that lined pipes and boilers at Norton Labs. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Individuals who worked in the pre-form department along with molders, finishers and maintenance personnel, were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing   process of plastic parts while working at Norton Labs. Those who worked in the pre-form department at Norton Labs were exposed to asbestos when they dumped bags and barrels of asbestos-containing plastic molding compound into a hopper, where the material was pressurized and weighed.

Opening and dumping these bags and barrels of compound created a cloud of dust, which the workers inhaled. Molders were also exposed to asbestos dust and fibers while pressing preformed molded compounds into plastic parts. After the molding compound was pressed and had time to harden and cure, molders removed the newly formed pieces and placed them in a tray or barrel, which was then sent to the finishing department. Before the next batch of plastic compound entered a hydraulic press, the molder used an air hose to blow out any remaining dust and debris from the mold. This was done to protect the integrity of the next product. This process was repeated every time the press was emptied, and it created asbestos dust in the breathing zone of the molders.

Steam was vital in the production process at Norton Labs. Steam was also used to heat buildings throughout the plant. Asbestos-containing pipe covering covered steam lines at Norton Labs. Due to wear and tear, it was common for asbestos-containing materials to be removed and reapplied. Once the worn insulation was removed, reapplication of asbestos insulation was necessary so that the pipes could effectively contain steam. During insulation reapplication, asbestos pipe covering was cut with a band saw and cement was mixed with water. Both processes created large clouds of asbestos dust. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at Norton Laboratories, Inc. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Norton Labs and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

NYSEG

New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) is a Binghamton, New York, based subsidiary of the Energy East Corporation that delivers gas and electric services to approximately 995,000 consumers throughout New York State. During the majority of the twentieth century, NYSEG depended on the use of coal-fired boilers and turbines to produce its power.

The boilers and turbines located throughout NYSEG’s power plants and generating stations were once covered in asbestos-containing thermal block insulation. NYSEG’s power stations, including Dresden, Hickling and Milliken facilities, were a significant source of asbestos exposure. Laborers who were once employed at NYSEG’s power stations were routinely exposed to asbestos-containing materials, including asbestos-containing block insulation, cement, pipe covering, gaskets and packing material found in pumps and valves. As a result of their exposure to asbestos-containing materials, many NYSEG workers have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

The efficient operation of a NYSEG power station depended largely upon that facility’s work force. The NYSEG work force consisted of a variety of laborers, each designated with a specific maintenance responsibility. For those who worked at a NYSEG facility during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s exposure to asbestos was common. Maintenance and repair trades, such as pump operators and journeymen, were placed at an elevated risk of exposure.

An intricate system of steam pipes and pumps could be found in many of NYSEG’s coal fueled power stations. Pipes and pumps required regular and frequent maintenance. Pump operators were responsible for replacing asbestos-containing gaskets that were contained within the flanges of a pipe system. Depending on the condition of the gasket in need of replacement, a pump operator may have been required to scrape and pry the gasket from its flange. This process caused asbestos dust to become airborne and spread into the working area of employees who did not have direct contact with the asbestos-containing materials. Asbestos gaskets were used because of their durability and ability to withstand high temperatures.

Asbestos pipe insulation also covered steam pipes at many NYSEG stations. Asbestos insulation was primarily used because of its durability and ability to withstand high heat temperatures in the steam lines. Asbestos could also be found in cement and in the block insulation that covered boilers and turbines.

Roughly once a year and on a rotating schedule, NYSEG’s power stations went into a maintenance period called shutdown. Each station’s shutdown lasted for approximately five to twelve weeks, and workers performed maintenance work on boilers, turbines, pumps and pipes. Insulation contractors or journeymen removed worn asbestos insulation from steam pipes and flat surfaces by sawing it or using scrapping tools such as claw hammers. After the worn insulation was removed, new asbestos insulation materials were applied to pipes, boilers and turbines so that the equipment could effectively contain steam and other high temperature materials. During the insulation application and removal processes, large clouds of asbestos dust became airborne and traveled into the working areas of those who were not in direct contact with the insulation materials. Most workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products that were applied and maintained at NYSEG power stations. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at a NYSEG power station and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

O-Cel-O

In 1946, O-Cel-O was founded on Leslie Street in Buffalo, New York, by former DuPont employees Jack Bitzer, Chester Hardt and Gerard Murray. The company manufactured artificial cellulose sponges for household use and was formed in order to take advantage of a shortage of natural sponges due to World War II and a sponge blight in the Caribbean Sea. By 1947, the company’s founders started manufacturing for the household market as the chemical formula for the man-made sponge was quickly patented. O-Cel-O was immediately successful, and in 1952, the company was acquired by General Mills. In 1990, the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) acquired O-Cel-O from General Mills. Located on Sawyer Avenue in Tonawanda, New York, the O-Cel-O plant consists of a 275,000 square foot manufacturing facility on 19 acres of land, and it employs over 400 people.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized during construction and maintenance procedures at O-Cel-O in Tonawanda, New York. Inhaling dust from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam heat was utilized at O-Cel-O in order to heat the building and to operate production equipment. In order to maintain a steady internal temperature in the heating system, boilers, pipes and valves were insulated with asbestos-containing materials. Asbestos-containing pipe covering was utilized as an insulation material that lined the outside of steam pipes throughout the plant. Asbestos block insulation and insulating cement covered boilers. Asbestos gaskets ensured a tight seal between flanges, and packing material prevented leaks from valve stems and pump shafts. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed worn pipe covering or block insulation; scraped gaskets from flanges; and pulled packing material from pumps and valves. These procedures emitted clouds of asbestos-containing dust or fibers into the air. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at O-Cel-O in Tonawanda, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Oldman Boiler Works

Established by William Oldman in 1863, Oldman Boiler Works was a fixture on Buffalo’s waterfront for more than a century. Oldman manufactured and repaired boilers and other equipment installed on numerous Great Lakes freighters that docked at the Buffalo Harbor. Oldman Boiler Works also manufactured various pieces of industrial equipment for companies, such as Bethlehem Steel, Mobil Oil and Niagara Mohawk. Oldman Boiler Works occupied an entire block on Illinois Street between South Park Avenue and Mary Street. At its peak in the 1950s, over ninety employees, mostly union boilermakers, worked for Oldman. In 1995, the buildings on the site were demolished in order to make way for a new sports arena now known as the KeyBank Center. Oldman Boiler Works ceased operation shortly afterward.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into insulating materials utilized on board Great Lakes freighters. Asbestos-containing insulation was typically applied to steam boilers and pipes throughout Great Lakes freighters in order to maintain a constant temperature within the steam system. During repair procedures, Oldman employees removed asbestos block insulation covering the boiler. Removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Oldman Boiler Works employees occasionally worked at industrial locations, such as Bethlehem Steel. There were numerous sources of asbestos exposure at these job sites, including pipe covering, block insulation, insulating cement and hot top refractory mortar. Due to normal wear and tear, these materials were removed and reapplied and, in the process, emitted dangerous levels of asbestos dust and fibers that nearby workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Oldman Boiler Works in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation

Founded by Franklin Olin in 1892, Olin Industries began as a blasting powder company, which supplied powder to Midwestern coal fields. Olin’s success allowed for the company’s expansion into small arms ammunition and the formation of the Western Cartridge Company in 1898. By the 1950s Olin Industries product line included brass and other nonferrous alloys, arms and ammunition, explosives, cellophane, cigarette and fine papers and forest products.

Mathieson Chemical Corporation was originally founded in 1892 by Thomas Mathieson, a British engineer. Mathieson’s original company was financially backed by a consortium of seven U.S. businessmen, which allowed Mathieson to design and build a plant to produce soda ash from the deposits of salt, coal and limestone in Saltville, Virginia. In 1897, the Mathesion Chemical Corporation established a hydroelectric plant in Niagara Falls, New York, in order to manufacture chlor-alkali products, including chlorine and caustic soda ash. The Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation was established in August 1954, through the merger of Olin Industries and Mathieson Chemical Corporation. The area of Niagara Falls where Olin Mathieson’s plant was located was known as Model City, New York. The company is known today as the Olin Corporation, and its Niagara Falls manufacturing facility is located on Buffalo Avenue.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation, packing material and gaskets were utilized throughout the manufacturing buildings at Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation. Workers who applied, removed or manipulated asbestos-containing materials, or individuals who were in the vicinity of where this work took place, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

At Olin Mathieson’s Niagara Falls plant, pipes, valves, pumps, and boilers transported steam and chemicals used during the manufacturing processes of soda ash and chlorine. Asbestos containing insulation was applied to pipes and other equipment in order to contain corrosive materials and to maintain a stable internal temperature within the steam and chemical pipe systems. Workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment during maintenance procedures. After repairs were completed, new asbestos insulation was applied. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation, emitted asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Owens Corning Delmar Plant

In 1938, Owens Corning, formerly known as Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation, was established from the joint partnership of two major American glasswork companies, Corning Glass Works and Owens-Illinois. Owens Corning, which is headquartered in Toledo, Ohio, was the first company to manufacture fiberglass insulation. This material quickly became the most popular form of home insulation, and by the end of the company’s first full year of operation, Owens Corning employed 600 workers with reported sales of $2.5 million. Years of expansion followed, and Owens Corning established dozens of manufacturing facilities throughout the United States.

In 1956, Owens Corning created its pink-colored fiberglass insulation, which is still considered the company’s staple. In 1980, the company acquired the Pink Panther cartoon character as a company mascot in order to advertise their PINK® insulation. This marketing tool was a great success and by the mid-1980s, Owens Corning established itself as a world leader in fiberglass insulation.

In June 1976, Owens Corning established its Delmar plant in Feura Bush, New York. The Delmar plant is one of thirteen Owens Corning glass insulation plants in America and has over 350 employees. Owens Corning is currently the world’s largest manufacturer of fiberglass, and the company has become a leading global producer of residential and commercial building materials, glass-fiber reinforcements and engineered materials for composite systems. Owens Corning has been a Fortune® 500 Company for 59 consecutive years and has over 18,000 employees throughout 28 countries.

Up until the mid-1970s, Owens Corning manufactured and distributed several products that contained asbestos. These products included asbestos-containing insulating cements, roofing and siding panels and fiberglass panels. Most notably, Owens Corning distributed and manufactured Kaylo® pipe covering and block insulation from 1953 to 1973. Laborers who manufactured these products were exposed to asbestos dust and fibers when they cut, sawed or manipulated asbestos-containing materials. Inhaling dust and particles from the manipulation of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. Owens Corning has faced major medical liabilities due to the company’s use of asbestos in its products, which ultimately led to the company’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2000. In 2006, Owens Corning emerged from Chapter 11.

Owens Corning’s asbestos-containing insulation was commonly used to cover water, chemical and steam lines, as well as boilers, which were utilized in commercial, residential and industrial buildings nationwide. Owens Corning asbestos-containing pipe insulation was widely used in United States Naval vessels. Navy veterans, plumbers, steamfitters, boilermakers, insulators and Navy personnel who were involved in the maintenance and repair of Owens Corning asbestos pipe insulation are also at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer because of their exposure to asbestos materials.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products manufactured by Owens Corning. If you or a loved one were once employed by Owens Corning or applied or removed asbestos containing products manufactured by Owens Corning and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Penn Dixie Cement Company

In 1867, shortly after the discovery of rich beds of limestone in Howes Cave, New York, the Howes Cave Lime & Cement Company established a cement plant and limestone quarry on Industrial Drive. In 1898, the Helderberg Cement Company acquired the property, and in 1925, it merged with Security Cement & Lime Company forming the North American Cement Company. The community of Howes Cave thrived in the 1950s. By the 1960s, however, more company buyouts took place, and industry giant Penn-Dixie Cement Co., acquired the quarry and cement operations in 1964. Penn-Dixie manufactured cement in powder (raw) form. The cement was bagged and shipped throughout the United States by rail and by truck.

PennDixie also had a cement plant in Blasdell, New York, and a shale quarry in Hamburg, New York. These two facilities in Western New York closed in 1965 and production was consolidated at Howes Cave. Due to new environmental regulations, as well as a decreased demand for cement products, Penn-Dixie closed its Howes Cave facility in 1976. During its peak production years, the Penn-Dixie Cement facility in Howes Cave employed around 250 people and production capacity was rated at nearly 1.8 million barrels of cement per year. Flintkote Cement briefly operated the facility from the late 1970s through the early 1980s, eventually shutting down production in 1986. The 350-acre limestone quarry is currently owned by Callanan Industries, and it is operated by Cobleskill Stone Products.

In recent years, former employees of Penn-Dixie Cement have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Large overhead cranes at Penn-Dixie moved raw materials, including stone, gypsum, iron ore and clinker. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into industrial crane brake linings. Repairmen periodically replaced worn asbestos-containing brake linings. In order to ensure that the new brake linings fit properly, it was often necessary to drill and grind the linings, which emitted a large amount of asbestos dust. Additionally, repairmen cleaned out the brake dust with compressed air as a part of the brake replacement process. Repairmen who were directly involved in this process are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma, and laborers who worked in the vicinity of where the repair work was conducted are also at risk.

During the manufacture of cement, Penn Dixie laborers used kilns in order to produce clinkers from pulverized shale. The kilns produced extremely high temperatures and required a lining of bricks and asbestos-containing refractory cement. Dry asbestos-containing refractory cement was mixed with water in order to create a slurry. The bricks in the kilns were then coated with the slurry. Burner pipes in the kilns were also wrapped with asbestos rope. Laborers wore asbestos gloves for protection when working with the kilns. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and fibers and carried on their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized at Penn-Dixie in order to ensure a tight seal between pipe flanges, valves, pumps and other equipment at the cement plant. Due to wear and tear, gaskets were frequently replaced. Asbestos-containing packing material was used in order to prevent leaks from valve stems and pump shafts. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials caused asbestos dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Penn-Dixie Cement in Howes Cave, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Pfaudler

Pfaudler Incorporated is a manufacturer of glasslined tanks used in the food, beverage, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Pfaudler was established in 1884, by brewer Casper Pfaudler as the Pfaudler Vacuum Fermentation Process Company. Casper Pfaudler wanted to accelerate the fermentation process through the application of a vacuum. Pfaudler failed at this undertaking, but his glass-lined steel tanks became popular with beer brewers.

In 1903, Pfaudler constructed a plant on West Avenue in Rochester, New York, in order to manufacture glass-lined tanks for various industrial applications. Beginning in the 1950s through the 1990s, Pfaudler went through a series of mergers and acquisitions. The company is now known as Pfaudler Reactor Systems, and it is a division of the Process Solutions Group of Robbins & Myers, Incorporated. Pfaudler maintains its headquarters and main production facilities at the West Avenue location.

Asbestos was used in the manufacturing process and as an insulation material at Pfaudler up until the late 1970s. Asbestos was incorporated into castable refractory cement, asbestos blankets and gaskets. Asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was also applied to the plant’s structural steel. Retirees and senior workers who worked at Pfaudler in Rochester, New York, are at the greatest risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Castable refractory cement contained asbestos, and it was cast into bricks for use in furnaces. At Pfaudler, furnaces were used to bake glass linings on the inside of tanks. Because of the high temperatures created in these furnaces, the brick lining deteriorated and required frequent repair. Asbestos-containing refractory cement was utilized to repair these brick linings. The refractory cement was manufactured as a dry powder, mixed with water to form a paste and applied to the interior of the furnace. Pouring and mixing the dry cement mix released asbestos fibers into the air, which workers subsequently inhaled.

At Pfaudler, asbestos blankets were used to serve as insulation between the glass-lined tanks and the stainless steel shell that surrounded the outside of the tanks. This blanket material was manufactured as one-half inch thick, four-foot by eight-foot sheets. Workers cut the blanket material to fit any irregularly shaped areas. Handling and cutting asbestos blanket material emitted asbestos fibers and dust into the air.

Pipes associated with the glass-lined tanks at Pfaudler contained gaskets composed of asbestos. These gaskets required regular replacement. Workers at Pfaudler fabricated gaskets from sheets of asbestos-containing gasket material. Cutting and removing asbestos containing gaskets also emitted asbestos dust into the air.

Contractors who performed repairs and upgrades at Pfaudler worked in close proximity to asbestos-containing fireproof insulation. Fireproof insulation was a mixture of asbestos, cement and waste from linen mills. It was applied to structural steel to protect the steel from high temperatures or fire damage. In order to gain access to the structural steel, carpenters, electricians, pipefitters, sheet metal workers and other contractors routinely disturbed the insulation after it was applied. When workers disturbed the insulation, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at Pfaudler and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to con- tact us regarding your legal rights.

Pinco

In 1904, Fred Locke purchased six acres of land in Lima, New York, in order to build a porcelain insulator manufacturing plant, known as the Lima Insulator Company. These insulators were placed on top of telegraph and power lines and aided in conducting high voltage electricity. Hard times hit the Lima plant in 1908 when two fires, bankruptcy claims and transfers of ownership took place. By 1920, the plant was rebuilt and operated under Porcelain Insulators Corporation or PINCO. The newly constructed plant sat on East Main Street in Lima, New York, and was managed and controlled by William Harvey who was the company’s primary stockholder. Harvey was also a stockholder in the Joslyn Manufacturing and Supply Company. After William Harvey passed away and the estate was settled, The Joslyn Manufacturing and Supply Company acquired full stock and PINCO became a wholly owned subsidiary. The company saw much expansion after this time and continued to grow by building new facilities and broadening their operations. The Lima plant was purchased by Industrial Ceramics, Inc., in 1985, and continued to manufacture insulators with the PINCO stamp. Operations ceased at the plant in 1987.

Prior to the late 1970s, those that worked at the PINCO plant in Lima were exposed to various forms of asbestos during their employment. Many asbestos-containing materials were utilized at PINCO during maintenance and upkeep procedures, including asbestos pipe covering, asbestos cement and asbestos block insulation. Laborers and contractors who worked at PINCO were at risk for asbestos exposure. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

PINCO’s Lima, New York, manufacturing facility required steam to heat its building and to deliver heat to the massive heaters located in the dry room. Asbestos block insulation lined the walls of the dry room and steam room. Asbestos-containing pipe covering and cement covered steam lines throughout the plant. During maintenance procedures and because of wear and tear, asbestos pipe covering was removed and reapplied so that the equipment within the steam system could maintain a constant internal temperature. Saws were used to cut the pipe covering, which created enormous amounts of dust. Asbestos-containing cement was dumped into a bucket and mixed with water, which also created large amounts of dust. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, has represented PINCO workers who were diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at PINCO, in Lima, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Plasterers Local 9

Plasterers Local 9 represents union plasterers in Western New York. In 1864, Local 9 became a charter member of the Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association (OPCMIA). Local 9 in North Tonawanda is also a member of the Buffalo Buildings and Construction Trades Council. Up until the late 1970s, Local 9 Plasterers applied dozens of asbestos-containing building materials, including fireproof insulation, acoustic plaster, acoustic tile and joint compound (mud). Members of Local 9 worked for contractors, such as Buffalo Acoustical, Hudson Plastering and Mader Plastering. Plasterers also worked at a variety of job sites throughout Western New York, including Bethlehem Steel, Ashland Oil, VA Hospital, Buffalo General Hospital, Albright Knox Art Gallery, Kleinhans Music Hall, Main Place Mall and Tower, Pohlman Foundry and the University at Buffalo North Campus.

 

Local 9 Plasterers were involved in the application of asbestos-containing joint compound (mud) in order to seal seams between sheets of drywall. Asbestos-containing joint compound was manufactured as a dry mix (a powder that requires water in order to form a paste for application) and ready-mix (an application-ready product).

Dry mix joint compound was packaged in paper bags, and it was mixed with water, in order to form a paste, and applied to the drywall. Three coats of joint compound were generally applied to drywall seams. After each coat of compound dried, it was sanded to a smooth surface. During both the mixing and sanding processes of asbestos joint compound, dust and fibers were released into the air putting not only Local 9 Plasterers at risk for asbestos exposure, but other tradesmen who worked in the vicinity as well.

Local 9 Plasterers also applied sprayed-on fireproofing and acoustical materials. Sprayed-on fireproofing and acoustical materials were manufactured as a dry powder, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel (fireproofing material) or ceiling or wall surfaces (acoustical materials).

During the application process of both fireproofing and acoustical materials, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where the material was being applied. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing fire proofing and acoustical materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems, including mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Carpenters and electricians, who also worked in the vicinity of where these materials were applied, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust. Many workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved once worked as a Local #9 Plasterer and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to con- tact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Plenco

In 1934, the American Molded Products Company was founded by Frank G. Brotz in Chicago, Illinois, as a manufacturer of phenolic plastic molding compounds. A few months after the company was established, it moved to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and it was renamed Plastics Engineering Company (Plenco). During its early years, Plenco molded products using molding compounds produced by other companies.

Because of a shortage of plastic molding compounds after World War II, the company began to manufacture its own line of plastic molding compounds. In subsequent years, Plenco’s molding compounds were manufactured for sale to outside companies. From the end of World War II until the 1990s, Plenco grew steadily, adding another factory in Sheboygan, as well as in various locations around the United States. Plastics Engineering Company is still a privately-held company headquartered in Sheboygan, and it manufactures plastic molding compounds, resins and molded products under the trade name Plenco.

Up until the early 1980s, Plenco incorporated asbestos into some of its phenolic molding compounds. Asbestos posed a high health-risk danger to mold shop workers who molded plastic parts from asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, as well as to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos-containing molding compounds into finished products. When asbestos-containing molded plastic products are manipulated, drilled or sanded, asbestos dust and fibers can easily become airborne and inhaled or ingested.

Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer because you worked with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Pohlman Foundry

The Pohlman Foundry was located at 205 Baitz Avenue in Buffalo, New York, and it manufactured gray iron castings for pumps and compressors. The Foundry was in operation for 113 years, and its customers included manufacturers of automotive and industrial parts. In 1998, the Pohlman Foundry was acquired by Lionheart Industries Inc. In 2002, the foundry ceased operations, and in 2004, it shut down permanently.

The Pohlman Foundry’s operations were contained to one building. As demand for iron castings grew, building additions were constructed to accommodate different departments, including, the large, medium, and small mold areas; furnaces and cupolas; an office; the maintenance department; and the finishing department. Asbestos insulation lined the walls of the finishing department. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into insulation materials for walls and other surfaces. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

Laborers were exposed to asbestos as they worked in the finishing room at the Pohlman Foundry. The finishing room contained blast units, grinders and chipping stations for cleaning castings before they were shipped. A blast unit is a machine that removes excess iron and impurities on metal castings by hitting them with steel shots. At the Foundry, it was common for the steel shots to hit the two to four inch, asbestos-containing wall insulation, causing it to tear and release asbestos fibers and dust into the finishing room. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of inhaling asbestos fibers and dust, and they carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Laborers that worked in the finishing department, as well as those who worked in its vicinity, may have been exposed to asbestos dust and are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former workers and retirees from the Pohlman Foundry. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Pohlman Foundry and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Pratt & Letchworth

In 1848, the Pratt & Letchworth Company was established by Samuel F. Pratt, Pascal P. Pratt and William P. Letchworth. The company initially manufactured cast iron hardware for saddles and carriages. Over the next few decades, Pratt & Letchworth diversified its product line to include cast iron hand tools, toys and railroad equipment. By the turn of the 20th Century, castings for railroad equipment became the company’s primary product. In 1923, the Dayton Malleable Iron Company acquired Pratt & Letchworth. Located on Tonawanda Avenue in Buffalo, New York, the Pratt & Letchworth foundry consisted of three buildings on 25 acres of land. During its peak production years, the company employed nearly 1,000 people. In 1981, faced with dramatically reduced demand for railroad equipment, Pratt & Letchworth ceased operations. In 2005, the foundry was demolished.

In order to melt iron and steel, Pratt & Letchworth used electrical arc furnaces. The interiors of the arc furnaces were lined with asbestos-containing refractory materials, which protected the furnace from deteriorating. Asbestos-containing refractory materials resisted high temperatures, but the refractory materials deteriorated after constant use and required replacement. During removal and application processes of refractory materials, asbestos containing dust and fibers became airborne, which workers inhaled. Workers who handled asbestos materials or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos was also incorporated into numerous materials that covered equipment at Pratt & Letchworth. Pipes, valves and pumps were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. Asbestos gaskets were used to ensure a tight seal between flanges of pumps, valves and pipes. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed worn pipe covering or block insulation; scraped gaskets from flanges; and replaced packing material in pumps and valves. These processes released asbestos-containing dust into the air, which workers inhaled.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Pratt & Letchworth in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

R.C. Siebert

From the 1950s to the 1980s, R.C. Siebert, a Rochester-based company, laid a great deal of water, sewer and utility pipe lines in and around Rochester, New York. Rochester Gas and Electric hired R.C. Siebert to install pipes that housed gas and electric lines. In a similar capacity, R.C. Siebert also installed pipe lines for Rochester Telephone.

R.C. Siebert installed transite pipe, which is an asbestos-containing cement material. Asbestos was added to Portland cement to increase its strength and fire resistance. Transite pipe was used for roof drains, furnace flues, water pipes, utility lines, sanitary sewer drains and HVAC ducts. In order to accommodate utility lines, workers cut transite pipe with a hacksaw to attain a desired length. The process of cutting transite pipe emitted a large amount of dust that workers inhaled. As a result of asbestos exposure through the installation of transite pipe, many workers developed mesothelioma, a cancer that is only caused by exposure to asbestos.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked for R.C. Siebert and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Rath Building

The Edward A. Rath County Office Building is located at 95 Franklin Street in Buffalo, New York. The Rath Building was completed in 1970 and is currently owned by Erie County. Today, it is home to many government offices, including the Erie County Executive’s office, Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Works and numerous other departments. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing pipe covering and fireproofing materials were used in the construction of the Rath Building. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

The fireproofing material used in the construction of the Rath building was a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material was packaged in paper bags as a dry powder. Prior to application, the fireproofing material was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto steel surfaces with a hose. Asbestos-containing dust was emitted during the mixing and application process. Electricians, iron workers, plumbers, pipefitters and plasterers who also worked in the vicinity where the fireproof material was applied, were put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust. After fireproofing material was applied, laborers routinely disturbed the asbestos-containing material in order to access the building’s structural and electrical components. Disturbing asbestos-containing fireproof material after it was applied also emitted dust and fibers.

Asbestos-containing pipe insulation also covered steam and water lines that ran throughout the Rath Building. Asbestos was incorporated into pipe covering prior to the late 1970s because it provided ample heat and fire resistance. Even handling asbestos-containing pipe covering caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. Workers who cut, sawed and applied and removed asbestos pipe insulation were likely exposed to airborne asbestos dust and fibers. Laborers who worked in the vicinity where pipe covering was applied and removed were exposed to asbestos and are at risk for developing mesothelioma and other asbestos related diseases.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed as an iron worker, fire proofer, electrician, plumber or laborer during the construction of the Edward A. Rath County Office Building, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Reichhold Chemicals

In 1927, German immigrant Henry Reichhold founded Beck, Koller & Company US in Detroit, Michigan, in order to import resins and paint from his family’s company in Vienna, Austria. Most of the resins and paints were sold to the Ford Motor Company. During the 1930s, the company began producing chemicals domestically, and it acquired several smaller chemical companies throughout the United States. In 1938, Beck, Koller & Company US became Reichhold Chemicals. This event followed the death of Henry’s brother Otto Reichhold, who perished in the Hindenburg disaster. In 1955, the company held an Initial Public Offering on the New York Stock Exchange and in 1981, it was listed for the first time in the Fortune 500. In 2005, Reichhold’s management team bought out the company’s stockholders, which made Reichhold a privately-held company.

Reichhold Chemicals operated many plants throughout the United States. One particular plant of interest was located in Carteret, New Jersey. At its Carteret plant, Reichhold manufactured some asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds. Asbestos posed a high-risk health danger to workers who manufactured granulated plastic molding compounds, as well as to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos-containing molding compounds into finished products. When asbestos-containing molded plastic products are manipulated, drilled or sanded, asbestos dust and fibers can easily become airborne and inhaled or ingested. Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer because you worked with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the nation’s oldest technological university. It was founded as the Rensselaer School in Troy, New York, in 1824 by Stephen Van Rensselaer. In the 1850s, Rensselaer expanded its objectives, becoming a polytechnic institution. In 1861, the Institute’s name was changed to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The college currently enrolls about 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students, and Rensselaer offers more than 145 programs at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels. Rensselaer occupies a 275 acre hill top campus overlooking the Hudson River and the historic city of Troy.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has undergone several expansions and renovations since its initial establishment in 1824. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials used during construction and renovations of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s campus. Asbestos-containing fireproofing, joint compound, insulating cement, block insulation and pipe covering were used in the construction of campus buildings, including class rooms, dormitories and offices. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Republic Steel

Buffalo and Lackawanna New York, have a rich steelmaking history. Republic Steel was built on the banks of the Buffalo River, giving it great access to Lake Erie and the Great Lakes and the rest of the United States. Ease in transportation and relatively inexpensive hydroelectric power from Niagara Falls made our community ideally suited for this South Buffalo landmark.

The mill was large, spanning nearly 300 acres, and housed nine open hearth furnaces, 2 basic oxygen furnaces and two blasts furnaces. Before being heavily impacted by the importation of foreign made steel, Republic employed some 2,500 workers working multiple shifts. If you worked at Republic Steel in Buffalo, New York, you may have been exposed to asbestos and could be at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Republic Steel closed in 1984. While it lasted, the mill provided good paying union jobs, but the prosperity it brought came with a heavy cost. In addition to massive pollution of land, water and air, the toxins from steel production resulted in industrial disease and death among its workers. One such toxic was the widespread use of asbestos used throughout the mill. Asbestos, or the “miracle fiber” as it once was called, was highly prized and widely used in steel production. Asbestos is a natural occurring element mined mostly in Canada and in parts of Africa which was nearly indestructible.

Asbestos is nearly impervious to heat and chemicals and, but for the horrific and deadly health consequences, it is ideally suited for a steel mill, which is filled with both. Although the asbestos fibers themselves are indestructible, the products they are manufactured from release large quantities of breathable fibers into the air when they are installed or removed, when they are cut, drilled, filed, banged into or simply degraded with time and wear. The fibers themselves are very aerodynamic and can be carried long distances in the mill until a worker breathes them in, or even when they are carried home on a workers clothing, thereby also exposing spouses and children.

Asbestos products at Republic were used both in the manufacture of the steel, and in the physical construction of the production buildings themselves. Furnaces and ovens were used to melt and hold steel at a desired temperature. Molten steel was transported by torpedo rail cars and poured with ladles. All of these structures and pieces of equipment were coated in asbestos thermal heat insulation and cements. When it came time to pour the molten metal, in some instances hot tops made of asbestos were used to line and cap the molds. The asbestos hot tops released large quantities of asbestos fibers when the ingots were removed after each pour.

Republic Steel had miles of steam pipes running through the mill. Asbestos pipe covering was continually removed and installed on the steam piping by either skilled tradesman employed by Republic, and/or outside union contractors who were brought in to erect and maintain them. Water was converted to steam by large commercial boilers which were insulated with asbestos. Steam was transported to where it was needed by pipes, pumps and valves. All of this associated equipment was insulated with asbestos.

All of the piping connections to this equipment were sealed with asbestos gaskets on bolted flanges. During maintenance and of flanged pumps, valves and steam traps, asbestos gaskets were hand scraped with a putty knife to get off some of the bigger pieces and the bakedon remainder would be ground off with a high-speed wire wheel. Asbestos rope packing was removed from valve stems and the stuffing boxes of pumps. All of this work was extremely dangerous and cancer causing. Asbestos dust generated from this work endangered both the tradesman performing the work and the nearby bystanders who were engaged in steel production in the area.

Even though Republic Steel has been closed for many years, now is the time that an asbestos cancer is likely to develop. Asbestos is toxic but acts much different than poison. Poison can be fast acting and once swallowed can cause immediate illness. Diseases such as mesothelioma or lung cancer often take decades after the exposure for a disease to appear. Even though it was common for workers to smoke cigarettes in years past, smoking does not cause mesothelioma. Asbestos exposure to a smoker makes it many times over as likely to develop lung cancer.

Although it takes many years to develop an asbestos disease, there are strict time deadlines after diagnosis to commence a claim. It is important to retain legal representation as soon as possible once that diagnosis is made. Please contact Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford – we are here to help!

Robert A. Keasbey

The Robert A. Keasbey Company was established in 1902 as an insulation contractor with offices in New York City and Syracuse, New York. Keasbey commonly utilized asbestos containing materials during the construction of new buildings and during maintenance and repair procedures at various job sites throughout Central New York. Pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were typically applied by Robert A. Keasbey laborers at commercial and industrial sites and utility projects. Workers who applied and/or removed asbestos-containing materials are at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Employees at the Robert A. Keasbey Company applied asbestos-containing materials manufactured by companies, such as Owens Corning, Pittsburgh Corning, Combustion Engineering and Eagle-Picher. Keasbey employees applied these products at job sites throughout New York State, including Con Edison power plants, Carrier Corporation, Oswego Steam Station and Nine Mile Point Nuclear Power Plant.

Asbestos was incorporated into pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation because of its resistance to fire and heat. Asbestos-containing insulation was used on steam, water and chemical lines in order to maintain steady temperatures within those systems. Workers applied block insulation and insulating cement to steam boilers. Pipe elbows, valves and pumps were covered with insulating cement. Applying, removing and maintaining asbestos-containing insulation emitted asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one once worked for the Robert A. Keasbey Company and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Roblin Steel

Roblin Steel was located on South Roberts Road in Dunkirk, New York. The 12-acre site was first developed in 1910 as part of a locomotive manufacturing company called American Locomotive Company (ALCO). ALCO used this site to manufacture process equipment consisting of heat exchangers, tunnel shields and steel pipes. During WWII, ALCO manufactured naval vessels, missile housing, nozzles and boosters for the war. The Atomic Energy Commission took over the plant in the late 1940s, and at that time, utilized the former ALCO facility for the manufacture of nuclear reactor components and package reactor units.

Roblin Steel purchased the former ALCO site in 1969, and operated a steel reclamation business, which employed roughly 280 workers. The plant consisted of three electric arc furnaces, several dust collection system baghouses, an outdoor electrical substation, multiple transformer rooms, rolling and hammer mills, a compressor house and a variety of other process equipment. The open lot directly next to the Dunkirk site, was owned by Roblin Steel and used as a landfill. In addition to its Dunkirk plant, Roblin operated a rolling mill in North Tonawanda and a scrap facility in Lackawanna. Roblin Steel’s Dunkirk facility ceased operations in 1987, and the former steel site sat idle until 1994, when the EPA began remediation of the site and removed 700 drums of hazardous waste. Chautauqua County obtained the property through tax foreclosure in 2001, and the property has since been listed as a Brownfield site by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Prior to the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials, were installed and removed at Roblin Steel’s Dunkirk plant, including asbestos refractory materials and asbestos-containing pipe-covering. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Laborers at Roblin Steel’s Dunkirk plant utilized hot tops during the steel-making process. A hot top is a cast iron device located on the top of a steel mold, and it traps impurities that rise out of the steel as the ingot cools and solidifies. In order to protect the hot top from damage, the interior of the hot top is lined with refractory materials. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was used as a refractory material because of its ability to withstand high temperatures. The hot tops used at Roblin Steel in Dunkirk were lined with either brick and asbestos-containing mortar or asbestos insulating boards.

Asbestos insulating boards were primarily manufactured by Ferro Engineering and Foseco Inc. The number of boards placed inside a hot top depended on the size of the mold, which ranged in size from one foot to ten feet wide. Even the act of handling an asbestos insulating board emitted asbestos fibers into the air. After each ingot or steel mold was cast, the asbestos insulating boards inside the hot top turned to ash and required replacement. Laborers used an air hose to remove the asbestos-containing ash from the hot top. This action created a cloud of asbestos-containing dust, which was inhaled by laborers working on the hot top and anyone else in the surrounding vicinity.

Exposure to asbestos dust and fibers resulting from working in a steel plant put many laborers and their families at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Roblin Steel in Dunkirk, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Rochester Acoustical Corporation

The Rochester Acoustical Corporation was established in 1958 in Rochester, New York. It was a prominent contracting company involved in the application of asbestos-containing spray-on fireproofing at job sites throughout the Rochester area. Rochester Acoustical also applied asbestos-containing joint compound (mud) that was used during construction to cover nail holes and seams between sheets of drywall before paint was applied. In 1976, Rochester Acoustical merged with the Mader Corporation (a.k.a. Mader Plastering), one of the largest construction contractors in Western New York. Today the company is based in Elma, New York and is known as Mader Construction Company, Inc. Mader was also known for using similar asbestos products at a variety of job sites throughout Western New York.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were widely used in the construction industry. Rochester Acoustical applied asbestos-containing fireproofing, joint compound and acoustical ceiling tiles at many major Rochester job sites, including but not limited to, Kodak Park (Building 47), Midtown Towers, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Rochester, as well as the Xerox Building in downtown Rochester.

The asbestos fireproofing that was sprayed onto the steel beams of buildings in Rochester was initially manufactured as a dry powder and mixed with water before it was sprayed onto the beams during construction. During the application process of fireproofing materials, large clouds of asbestos dust and fibers were emitted into the air of the buildings where the material was being applied. Even long after this material was applied, the smallest vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing acoustical materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one worked at any job site in conjunction with Rochester Acoustical and/or Mader Plastering in the 1960s and 1970s, and have developed mesothelioma or lung cancer, it is important to request legal help and learn what can be done to compensate you for your injuries.

If you were present and preformed any work during the construction of the Xerox Building in Rochester, you were potentially exposed to asbestos when Rochester Acoustical applied asbestos materials. Rochester Acoustical played a major role in the construction of the Xerox Building in 1967. The Xerox Building is a skyscraper located in downtown Rochester, and it includes an auditorium. Asbestos fireproofing and joint compound were applied by Rochester Acoustical employees throughout these buildings. Electricians, plumbers and ironworkers typically worked in the vicinity of Rochester Acoustical employees when they applied asbestos materials and remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Employees of Rochester Acoustical also installed acoustical ceiling tiles, which contained asbestos. Cutting and installing asbestos ceiling tiles, releases asbestos fibers into the air, which workers inhaled.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, are familiar with the job sites and asbestos-containing products used by Rochester Acoustical and Mader. If you or a loved one were once employed by Rochester Acoustical and/or the Mader or worked at any job site in Western New York that involved Rochester Acoustical or Mader and have developed mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Rochester Davis-Fetch Corporation

Established in 1955, the Rochester Davis-Fetch Corporation is a specialty contractor involved in the installation of acoustical ceilings, drywall, plaster and fireproofing materials. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials utilized by Davis-Fetch, including ceiling tile, joint compound (mud) and fireproof insulation. Employees of Davis-Fetch also worked in close proximity to workers who installed asbestos-containing pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, as well as lung cancer and other asbestos related diseases.

The Davis-Fetch Corporation was a well known fireproofing contractor. Fireproof insulation applied by Davis-Fetch was a mixture of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. It was packaged in bags, dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel. Mixing and spraying the insulation produced clouds of asbestos-containing dust, which workers subsequently inhaled. Ironworkers, plumbers, carpenters and electricians who worked with rebar and conduits in the vicinity of where fireproofing materials were being applied, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers.

Davis-Fetch also installed asbestos-containing ceiling tiles at numerous commercial locations. Simply handling ceiling tiles produced asbestos-containing dust. In order to accommodate irregular parts of a ceiling, or to allow for ventilation and lighting, it was often necessary to cut ceiling tiles using a jab saw. Cutting the ceiling tiles also emitted asbestos dust and fibers.

Workers employed by Davis-Fetch used asbestos-containing joint compound to seal seams between sheets of drywall. Joint compound was manufactured as either ready-mix (an application-ready product) or as dry mix (a powder that requires water in order to form a paste for application). Dry mix joint compound was packaged in fifty-pound paper bags, and it was mixed in a bucket with water. Pouring and mixing joint compound caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne. In order to finish drywall, several coats of joint compound were applied to the seams between each piece of drywall. After one coat of joint compound dried, it was sanded before the next coat was applied. Sanding joint compound also emitted asbestos dust and fibers.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one once worked for Rochester Davis-Fetch Corporation and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Rochester Gas & Electric (RG&E)

Rochester Gas and Electric (RG&E) is a utility company that supplies natural gas and electricity to consumers throughout a 2,700 square mile area surrounding Rochester, NY. Its offices are located at 89 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14649.

If you worked at a Rochester Gas & Electric station in Rochester, New York, you may have been exposed to asbestos and could be at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Throughout the later half of the twentieth century, RG&E has depended largely on the use of coal burning boilers and nuclear

turbines in order to produce its power. The boilers and turbines at RG&E’s Russell and Beebe coal stations, located in Rochester, New York, and its Ginna Nuclear Station, located in Ontario, New York, were once covered in asbestos-containing thermal block insulation and were a significant source of asbestos exposure. Laborers employed at these stations regularly came into contact with asbestos-containing block insulation, cement, pipe covering, gaskets, packing material and pumps. In recent years, former laborers of Rochester Gas & Electric (RG&E) who once worked at the Russell, Beebe, and Ginna stations have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Until the mid-1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized as efficient insulation for intensely heated equipment, such as pipes, boilers and turbines and other equipment throughout RG &E powerhouses and substations. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos insulation and other materials placed employees at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Once a year, RG&E’s stations went into a maintenance period called “shut down” when workers were directed to dismantle asbestos insulation from power turbines, pipes and boilers. During annual maintenance shut downs, worn asbestos insulation was removed by sawing insulation off of pipes and flat surfaces, filling the work atmospheres with asbestos dust and fibers. This process created enormous dust clouds.

After the worn insulation was removed, reapplication of asbestos insulation was necessary so that the pipes, boilers and turbines could effectively contain steam and other high temperature materials. During insulation reapplication, in order to prepare cement, dry asbestos cement mix was continuously dumped into water creating large clouds of asbestos dust. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

On June 22, 2018, RG&E and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation entered into a Multi-Site Order on Consent, which implemented RG&E’s Work Plans for remedial activities of environmental contamination at each RG&E properties.

Rochester Gas & Electric’s Beebee Station (Station 3) – Rochester, New York

The Beebee Station was a coal-fired power plant that operated from 1892 through 1999, and was located in the heart of the City at 100 Platt Street, Rochester, New York. It was located adjacent to High Falls and the Genesee River, and was instrumental in combining steam and hydroelectric power. It was named after the RG&E Chairman, Alexander Beebee, and the Beebee Station was formally dedicated in 1959. Demolition of the Beebee Station was completed in 2017.

Rochester Gas & Electric’s West Station

The West Station (located in the Genesee River Gorge) was also used as part of the large coal-fired power generating facility and was part of the Beebee Station to the West. The West Station site is located along the west bank of the Genesee River in the City of Rochester, Monroe County. The site is approximately a quarter mile northwest of the Genesee River’s High Falls.

Rochester Gas & Electric’s East Station

At RG&E’s two gas works, known as West Station (located on the site of the present Beebee Station on the west side of the river near the Platt Street Bridge) and the East Station (at the site of the Citizen’s Gas Company plant north of Bausch Drive), over 289,000 tons of coal and almost 3.4 million gallons of oil were converted into gas and 184,000 tons of coke.

Rochester Gas & Electric’s Russell Station (Station 7) – Greece, New York

Constructed in 1948, RG&E’s Russell Station was located in Greece, New York on the Lake Ontario shoreline, and was once the biggest power plant in Monroe County. By the mid2000s, coal was being frowned upon because of its high pollution rate, and in 2006 the New York State threatened to sue RG&E because the Russell Station’s pollution-control equipment was out of date. That same year, RG&E reached a settlement with New York State that required the shutdown of the coal-fired Russell Station power plant after improvements were made to power lines and substations. An investigation by the NYS Attorney General’s Office and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation found that RG&E had made modifications to the Russell Station and increased air pollution emissions and bypassing pollution controls required by the state. Under the agreement, RG&E had to build a cleaner, natural gas facility; they were fined $200,000, and were required to invest $500,000 in energy efficient/air pollution projects in Monroe, Livingston, Ontario, Orleans and Wayne counties. Ultimately, the plant was demolished in 2016; the entire area was regraded and planted with native grasses and surrounded by chain-link fence. An electric substation was all that remained. RG&E spent approximately $59.9 mill to demolish both the Beebee and Russell plants.

Robert Emmett Ginna Nuclear Power Plant (GINNA Nuclear Power Plant) – Wayne County, New York

The Robert Emmett Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, commonly known as Ginna (ghih-NAY), is a nuclear power plant located on the southern shore of Lake Ontario, in the town of Ontario, Wayne County, New York. It is approximately 20 miles (32 km) east of Rochester, New York. RG&E spent $75 million to construct the Ginna plant in 1966. It is a single unit Westinghouse 2-Loop pressurized water reactor. Having gone into commercial operation in 1970, Ginna became the second oldest nuclear power reactor, after Nine Mile unit 1, still in operation in the United States when the Oyster Creek power plant was permanently shut down on September 17, 2018. The Ginna Plant was owned and operated by RG&E until 2004, when it was sold to Constellation Energy, whose parent company, Exelon, now owns and operates the plant. RG&E still purchases power generated at the Ginna plant.

The attorneys at Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products at RG&E power stations. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at an RG&E power station and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)

When it was originally founded in 1891, the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) was located in downtown, Rochester, New York, and known as the Rochester Athenaeum and Mechanics Institute. In 1961, due to increasing student enrollment and expanded course offerings, RIT’s administration relocated the university’s campus to its current location in Henrietta, New York.

Construction of RIT’s Henrietta Campus began in 1964. Today, the campus spans over 1,300 acres of land and is comprised of 237 buildings, including laboratories, athletic facilities, auditoriums and a field house. The initial construction phase of RIT’s Henrietta campus terminated in 1968, but renovations and the erection of new facilities are frequent and ongoing. In recent years, laborers who assisted in the construction of RIT’s Henrietta Campus have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos could be found as a component of insulation and building materials, including joint compound, pipe covering and fireproofing materials. These materials were used throughout the construction of the 1,300 acre campus. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, or those who worked in the same vicinity where these materials were applied and removed, are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for the Rochester Institute of Technology were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked on construction projects at RIT, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Rogers Corporation

Rogers Corporation was founded in 1832 in Manchester, Connecticut, by Peter Rogers as the Rogers Paper Manufacturing Company. Over the next century, the company produced several different types of paper for industrial use. In 1932 and during the Great Depression, the Rogers Company partnered with Dr. Leo Baekeland, who invented phenolic plastic molding compounds and Bakelite. Together they developed a line of phenolic plastic molding compounds, which expanded and diversified the Rogers product line. In 1936, Rogers Corporation purchased a factory in Goodyear (now Rogers), Connecticut, from the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. Rogers, Connecticut, became the company’s headquarters and main production site for its phenolic plastics. In 1945, in recognition of the decreasing importance of paper manufacturing, the company was renamed the Rogers Corporation. In 1960, Rogers Corporation was listed on the American Stock Exchange, and in 2000, it was listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Today, Rogers has plants in Connecticut, Illinois and Arizona, as well as international facilities in Korea, China, Belgium, Germany and Hungary.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into some phenolic plastic molding compounds manufactured by Rogers Corporation. Asbestos posed a high-risk health danger to workers who manufactured granulated plastic molding compounds, as well as to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos-containing molding compounds into finished products. When asbestos-containing molded plastic products are manipulated, drilled or sanded, asbestos dust and fibers can easily become airborne and inhaled or ingested. Exposure to dust and fibers emitted from asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer because you worked with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Roswell Park Cancer Institute

The Roswell Park Cancer Institute was established in 1898 by Doctor Roswell Park under the patronage of the New York State Department of Health. Originally called the New York State Pathological Laboratory, it was the world’s first center for the study and treatment of cancer. In 1904, the institute administered the world’s first chemotherapy program, and in 1911, it changed its name to the New York State Institute for the Study of Malignant Diseases.

The State Department of Health honored Dr. Park’s contributions to the institute in 1946 when it was renamed Roswell Park Cancer Institute. In 1947, Doctors Carl Cori and Gerty Cori were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their research into carbohydrate metabolism. In 1997, the New York State Legislature reorganized Roswell Park into a non-profit public benefit corporation in order to allow the institute to be more competitive against larger, corporate run health care facilities in Western New York. Roswell Park currently maintains a teaching affiliation with the University at Buffalo’s medical school. Located on Elm and Carlton Streets in downtown, Buffalo, the Roswell Park campus consists of fifteen buildings on twenty-five acres of land.

Up until the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials utilized during construction and maintenance procedures at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Joint compound, block insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and fireproof insulation contained asbestos. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel throughout Roswell Park in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry mixture and it was packaged in large paper bags. The fireproofing material was poured into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto the structural steel. Spraying and mixing fireproof insulation emitted clouds of asbestos-containing dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

Drywall finishers utilized asbestos-containing joint compound (mud) in order to fill seams between sheets of drywall. Joint compound was manufactured as either a dry mix or a readymix. Dry joint compound was mixed with water in order to prepare it for application. Pouring and mixing dry joint compound released asbestos dust and fibers into the air. After joint compound was applied to the drywall seams and dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface to prepare it for paint. These processes caused asbestos dust to become airborne and inhaled by workers in the surrounding area.

Steam boilers provided heat and hot water for Roswell Park. In order for the steam system to operate efficiently, boilers, pipes, valves and pumps within the system were covered with asbestos-containing insulation. Workers removed and applied insulation during maintenance or repair procedures. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulation emitted asbestos dust into the air. Many workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with construction or maintenance projects at Roswell Park Cancer Institute and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Sampson Air Force Base

Sampson Air Force Base was established in 1951 on the site of a former Naval Training Station near Romulus, New York. Adjacent to Seneca Lake, the base spanned over 2,600 acres and consisted of hundreds of buildings, including barracks, mess halls, drill halls, medical facilities, chapels, administrative offices and aviation support buildings. Over 300,000 airmen were trained at the base, as it was used as a training center for United States Air Force recruits during the Korean War. In 1956, Sampson Air Force Base closed because of a decrease in the military budget after the end of the Korean War. In 1957, the base airfield was taken over by the United States Army in order to support operations at the nearby Seneca Army Depot. In 1960, the State of New York purchased the remainder of Sampson Air Force Base, and it demolished most of the buildings at the base. In 1964, Sampson State Park opened on the location of the former Air Force Base.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the maintenance and upkeep of the buildings at Sampson Air Force Base. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

The buildings at Sampson Air Force Base were heated by steam boilers, which were located in nearly every building on the base. Steam was delivered to radiators through a system of pipes and valves. In order to maintain a steady internal temperature in the heating system, boilers, pipes and valves were insulated with asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Air Force personnel and civilian contractors maintained the heating systems and performed repairs. During maintenance and repair procedures, asbestos-containing materials were removed in order to access the heating system. When the maintenance or repair procedure was complete, workers applied new asbestos insulation. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulating materials caused asbestos fibers and dust to become airborne. Even individuals who were in the vicinity of where this work took place were exposed to asbestos.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at Sampson Air Force Base and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease such as mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Samuel A. Carlson Generating Station

The Samuel A. Carlson Generating Station (Carlson Plant) was initially constructed in 1891 in Jamestown, New York, in order to provide street lighting. Located on Steele Street near the Chadakoin River, Carlson Plant is one of the oldest municipal power plants in the United States. It is also the largest municipal power plant in New York State. Since 1923, the Jamestown Board of Public Utilities has managed its operation. Carlson Plant currently utilizes four coal-fired boilers which power two turbine generators that have a maximum output of 50 megawatts.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into a variety of materials that insulated equipment associated with the steam system at Carlson Plant. During maintenance procedures, workers removed and applied asbestos-containing pipe covering, packing material, insulating cement, gaskets and block insulation. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Carlson Plant’s four coal-fired boilers produced steam in order to turn its two turbine generators. The steam was delivered to the turbines through a network of asbestos-covered pipes, pumps, steam traps and valves. Asbestos-containing insulation also covered the turbines. During maintenance procedures on the steam system, laborers removed asbestos-containing insulation. New insulation was applied after maintenance and repairs were completed. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Asbestos-containing gaskets were also utilized at Carlson Plant in order to create a tight seal between pipe flanges, valves and pumps. Asbestos-containing packing material was wrapped around pump shafts and valve stems in order to prevent leaks. Laborers replaced asbestos gaskets and packing material during maintenance on pumps and valves. During the replacement process, asbestos dust and fibers were emitted, which workers inhaled.

Roughly once a year, the Carlson Plant in Jamestown went into a maintenance period called shutdown. When a shutdown was ordered, workers performed maintenance on boilers, turbines, valves, pumps and pipes. Worn asbestos insulation was removed from equipment in the steam system using scrapping tools, such as claw hammers and hand saws. When the worn insulation was removed and the repairs were made, new asbestos insulation was applied to the pipes, boilers and turbines. These processes emitted large amounts of asbestos dust. Asbestos dust was also released into work areas of employees who did not participate in shutdowns or have direct contact with asbestos-containing materials.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Samuel A. Carlson Generating Station in Jamestown, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Sealright Company

The Sealright Company, was founded in 1883, by Forrest Weeks as the Oswego Falls pulp and paper company. When Sealright was in operation, it was the largest manufacturer of frozen dairy   dessert   packaging in North America, which incorporated flexographic printing techniques in the manufacturing process of its packaging materials. Sealright maintained manufacturing facilities in Fulton, New York; Akron, Ohio; Los Angeles, California; Raleigh and Charlotte, North Carolina; and Kansas City, Missouri. In 1998, the Sealright Company was acquired by Huhtamaki Oyj (a Finnish packaging company), but it still remains a leader in consumer goods packaging and foodservice containers.

At the Sealright Company, flexographic printing was utilized on a variety of its dairy and food service containers. The flexographic printing process uses a steam-heated press to compress a metal (zinc or magnesium) plate into matrix board. Prior to the late 1970s, some matrix boards contained asbestos. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause meso- thelioma or lung cancer. Flexographic printers or plate makers came into contact with asbestos-containing matrix boards during the printing and clean-up processes involved in manufacturing flexographic printed materials.

Flexographic printers who worked at Sealright used asbestos-containing matrix boards to convert the master printing plate to a rubber plate that was able to withstand high heat temperatures. Workers inhaled asbestos fibers when they cut matrix boards to size so that the board properly fit into a steam heated press. After a pattern was molded into the matrix board, and had time to cure, sheets of uncured or unvulcanized rubber were placed on the board. When the unvulcanized rubber plate material was cast into the matrix molds, the cured plate was sanded and transported to the printing press where it was mounted on plate cylinders with double sided adhesive. The printing process then took place where flexible film or paper was transferred onto finished products, such as plastic bags, paper bags, paper milk cartons or ice cream containers.

It was typical for asbestos-containing dust to collect in the steam presses from cutting matrix boards to size. Before a new board was pressed, workers used an air hose to blow out excess dust that accumulated in the press. This process was extremely messy, and created asbestos-containing dust clouds. Many workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Flexographic printers, as well as those who worked in the vicinity, may have been exposed to asbestos dust and are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former workers and retirees from the Sealright Company. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at Sealright or as a flexographic printer and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Sealtest Ice Cream

The Sealtest brand name was established by National Dairies in 1934, when it changed the name of its ice cream from Tasty to Sealtest. As the popularity of ice cream grew in the United States, Sealtest sold over 267,000 gallons during the first year its ice cream was mass produced. Sealtest Ice Cream was originally sold at the Sealtest Ice Cream Parlor and the Sealtest Ice Cream Wagon at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, which allowed for it to gain fast popularity. In the 1930s and 1940s under parent companies National Dairies and Kraft Foods, Sealest was mainly sold in drug stores, soda fountain shops, independent grocery stores and restaurants. As grocery stores expanded into frozen food products, production of ice cream continued to grow, and by the early 1950s, Sealtest established many ice cream plants throughout the United States, including plants and distribution centers in Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Hamburg and Lockport. By the 1960s and 1970s, production of ice cream had grown to 4.5 million gallons per year.

In 1976, Breyers Ice Cream was introduced to the National Dairies and Kraft Foods product line. At this time, Sealtest began producing Sealtest Frozen Yogurt, sales of which skyrocketed due to diet-conscious consumers. In the 1980s and early 1990s there were several internal changes at Kraft Foods, which led to the merger and acquisition of smaller product lines under the Sealtest Division of the Kraft Company. In 1993 Unilever, the largest ice cream marketer in the world, acquired the ice cream operations of Kraft General Foods and combined it with the Good Humor frozen novelties company to form Good Humor-Breyers. Sealtest ice cream is no longer made.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance of the Sealtest Plants in New York State. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at a Sealtest facility and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation

Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation (also known as Todd Pacific Shipyard) is located in Harbor Island, across Elliot Bay from the downtown Seattle waterfront at 1801 16th Ave. In 1940, Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation received $9 million in government seed money to build a facility dedicated to making destroyer ships, including the USS Shelton and the USS Eversole. At one point, the shipyard employed 28,000 people.

During World War II, Todd Dry Dock & Construction Company acquired the shipyard. The Navy sold the yard to the Port of Tacoma in 1959, and its site is now part of the port’s Commencement Bay Industrial Development District. Today, the site is known as Vigor Shipyards. It continues to be a leading regional shipyard at Harbor Island where it has a reputation for commercial, Navy and Coast Guard construction, modernization and repair.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, shipyards used asbestos during the construction and repair of naval vessels. During construction and maintenance of ships, insulators, electricians, plumbers, welders and pipefitters may have been exposed to asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe insulation, gaskets, cement, and block insulation. Those who also worked near or in the vicinity of those who repaired and maintained asbestos-containing materials were also at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers. As insulators applied insulation to hot equipment, such as pipes and boilers, laborers may have been exposed to asbestos dust.

Engine rooms aboard naval vessels typically had poor ventilation. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases.

If you or a loved one were once employed at Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation on Harbor Island near Seattle, Washington, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

Semet-Solvay (Tonawanda Coke)

In 1917, Allied Chemical opened its coke oven plant on River Road in Tonawanda, New York, as part of the Semet-Solvay Company. When Allied sold its Tonawanda plant in 1978, it became known as the Tonawanda Coke Corporation. The original SemetSolvay battery was built in 1917 and contained sixty coke ovens. It was taken out of service in 1972. Battery #2 was put into operation in 1926 and it also contained sixty ovens. Battery

#2 was taken out of service in 1961, dismantled and replaced with a Wilputte gun-fired, hairpin, cross-regenerative designed battery that also contains sixty ovens.

Asbestos insulation and asbestos cement were applied to the insides of coke ovens to prevent the brick on the inside of the ovens from deteriorating. The asbestos refractory materials were continuously applied and removed, because even though they were an effective insulation material, they deteriorated under consistent use of high heat. Pipes and bypass lines associated with the coke ovens were sealed with asbestos gaskets and covered in asbestos-containing pipe covering.

The doors and many of the metal components associated with the ovens were coated with asbestos-containing fireproofing and rope insulation in an effort to contain as much heat as possible. Dust produced and inhaled during the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials throughout Semet-Solvay, exposed dozens of men who worked at this facility. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer to develop years after initial exposure to asbestos dust and fibers.

The coke ovens at the Semet-Solvay Company, later known as the Tonawanda Coke Corporation, presented health risks for exposure to asbestos; but, those who worked on top of or alongside coke oven batteries are at a substantially increased risk for developing lung cancer and other cancers. Coke oven emissions are composed of gases and dust harmful to your lungs and skin.

Tonawanda Coke Corporation operated the coke manufacturing facility from 1978 until operations at the site were abandoned in October 2018, leaving behind a vast amount of toxic materials, including numerous coal/coke piles, drums and tanks with coal tar sludges, acids, bases, flammable liquids and potentially explosive materials. All toxic waste, including asbestos-containing materials, are being mitigated, and historic piles of contaminated soil will be shipped for disposal to EPA-approved disposal facilities. A portion of the site was designated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as a state superfund site.

In July of 2018, a cease-and-desist letter was delivered to the Tonawanda Coke plant. It included a notice of intent to revoke Tonawanda Coke’s DEC Operating Permit, after a state Department of Environmental Conservation inspection of the facility found persistent and repeated violations of the plant’s DEC permit and environmental regulations. Thus, the plant was ordered to shut down operations. That order was based on a state inspection of the coke plant as a result of numerous complaints from residents who live near the River Road facility in the Town of Tonawanda.

On October 14, 2018, Tonawanda Coke Corporation suspended operations and initiated process shutdown to permanently close its facility. The United States Environmental Protection Agency performed emergency response work at the site until March 20, 2020; at which time the NYDEC took over and continues its oversight of the removal and clean-up of the toxic wastes left behind at the former Tonawanda Coke site.

Suspicion regarding potential casual associations between coal tar products in general and cancer of the internal organs, including lung cancer, may have existed as far back as the 1890’s, but these suspicions were not actively investigated. By the 1950’s there was a reasonable degree of scientific and medical certainty that coke oven chargers were nearly three times more likely to die of a respiratory cancer than other industrial workers. In 1951, Kettering Laboratory of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine’s Department of Preventive Medicine and Industrial Health approached Koppers Company Inc., Allied Chemical Company (now Honeywell) and other coke and steel companies about a proposed research project to study the carcinogenic properties of coal tar and gas tar, and to perform an experimental and epidemiological investigation of potential health hazards associated with coal tar.

The Kettering Study lasted approximately nine years. The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the chemical composition of various tars and tar fractions and their effects on the skin and internal organs (especially the lungs) of experimental animals. When Kettering published its preliminary report in 1960, Kettering detailed its success in producing a lung carcinoma in mice through the inhalation of a coal tar aerosol. Although the carcinoma differed from that experienced in humans, the results were deemed promising. The Kettering study also disclosed that the lidman was considered to be the most exposed job classification in the coke oven operation. It was confirmed that non-white coke plant workers experienced a higher incidence of lung cancer than white coke plant workers. This difference was attributed, at least in part, to the fact that non-white workers spent more time on the top-side of coke ovens.

The investigations commenced by the Kettering Laboratory came to a conclusion with a publication of the final report in 1961. Thereafter, the industry largely ignored health risk incident to working on or alongside coke oven batteries.

It was not until 1979 that the federal government acting through Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) established a final coke oven emissions standard.

In February 1984, the United States Environmental Protection Agency published the Final Report, “Carcinogen Assessment of Coke Oven Emissions.

If you or a loved one worked at any of the various coke oven operations around the area, including Bethlehem Steel, Donner Hanna, or Tonawanda Coke and if you are suffering from mesothelioma, lung or other cancers, please contact us to discuss a potential legal claim. Former coke oven workers, even if they smoked cigarettes, may have valuable claims that can be pursued in Court against companies responsible for the design, construction and maintenance of coke ovens. Our services include lawsuits against manufacturers and claims under the New York State Workers’ Compensation Law.

Sid Harvey Industries

Sid Harvey Industries, Inc., was founded in Hempstead, New York in 1931, and it is a manufacturer and distributor of heating, air-conditioning, ventilation and refrigeration supplies. Originally, the company was a wholesale supplier of parts and equipment for the oil heating industry. Sid Harvey Industries grew rather quickly, and by World War II, its mail order catalog and business model allowed it to quickly expand throughout New York State by establishing company branches in cities, such as Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Albany, Watertown, Brooklyn and Poughkeepsie.

By the 1950s, and as the need for air-conditioning and refrigeration parts grew, Sid Harvey Industries acquired smaller supply houses throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. By the late 1980s, Sid Harvey Industries expanded into the Midwest and Southern states. Today, Sid Harvey Industries continues to manufacture and distribute parts and equipment for HVAC industries. Currently there are approximately 85 Sid Harvey locations in twenty states, including the District of Columbia, New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Colorado and Wyoming. The company generates annual sales of $120 million.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous materials that were utilized in boilers and furnaces, including asbestos-containing furnace cement, insulating cement, gaskets, rope and packing. Sid Harvey Industries, Inc., supplied and distributed these asbestos-containing products to contractors and companies throughout the United States. Sid Harvey Industries also sold and distributed asbestos gasket material (pre-fab and rolls), pipe covering, block insulation, asbestos boards, raw asbestos and asbestos tape. Most of these materials were labeled Sid Harvey.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at Sid Harvey Industries, Inc., and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Simonds Saw and Steel – aka Guterl Steel

The Simonds Saw and Steel facility in Lockport, New York, was established in 1911 to replace a previous facility in Chicago, Illinois. This move was undertaken in order to utilize hydroelectric power from Niagara Falls, and to allow for greater control over the quality of the steel used in their tools. In 1965, Simonds sold the mill to Wallace-Murray, who operated the facility until 1978. At that time, it was purchased by Guterl Special Steel Corporation. The mill closed in 1983, after Guterl filed for bankruptcy. In 1984, a portion of the facility was purchased by Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation for the production of specialty steel products. Asbestos-containing refractory   and   insulating materials were used in the production process at Simonds. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials, or those who were in the vicinity of those workers who did, are at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

In the melting and casting departments at Simonds Saw and Steel, Ajax induction furnaces were used to produce molten steel. Laborers who operated these furnaces wore asbestos mitts to protect their hands from the high temperatures involved in steel making. On a regular basis, these furnaces were broken down with air hammers and rebuilt to replace the refractory linings. This ensured that the molten metal could not touch the heating coils. Layers of asbestos paper were incorporated into the refractory material. When the furnaces were dismantled, the asbestos paper was torn apart by the air hammer, which released clouds of asbestos-containing dust into the air. As the furnaces were rebuilt, new linings of asbestos paper were cut and put into place, which also caused asbestos fibers to become airborne.

When molten steel was heated to a high temperature, it was poured into an ingot mold to cool and take a shape that could be more easily handled. As the molten steel cooled and hardened, any impurities contained within the steel rose to the top of the mold. In order to increase efficiency and decrease waste, a cast iron device called a hot top was placed on top of the mold to trap these impurities. Due to the high temperature of molten steel, the interior of the hot top was lined with refractory materials. At Simonds Saw and Steel, asbestos-containing refractory mortar was used to protect the hot tops from heat damage. This refractory mortar was replaced before every use. In order to make the mortar, a dry mix was poured into a tub or bucket, and mixed with water.

As this dry mix was poured and mixed with water, asbestos fibers were released into the air. Anyone who was in the vicinity of the pouring and mixing could have been exposed to asbestos. Additionally, the hot tops at Simonds were wrapped with asbestos rope to ensure a good seal with the ingot mold. Handling, cutting or disturbing this rope caused asbestos dust to become airborne. After the steel ingot had hardened sufficiently, the hot top was removed and the remnants of the refractory material and asbestos rope were blown out with an air hose, which emitted more asbestos fibers into the atmosphere.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC represents former workers and retirees from the former Simonds Saw and Steel mill in Lockport. In the process of representing these workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the types of asbestos-containing materials to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at Simonds Saw and Steel and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Sisters of Charity Hospital

In 1848, the Sisters of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious order, established the first hospital in Buffalo, New York. Sisters of Charity Hospital was originally located on St. Louis Place, and in 1876, it moved to the corner of Main Street and Delavan Avenue. In 1948, Sisters Hospital relocated to its current location at the corner of Main and Humboldt Streets and on the site of a former maternity hospital and mental institution. Several additions and renovations have been completed at Sisters Hospital. The hospital currently maintains 467 beds for inpatient care, and it offers emergency, maternity, cardiology and rehabilitation services.

Many trades, such as carpenters, electricians, pipefitters, laborers, insulators and sheet metal workers were involved in construction and renovation projects at Sisters Hospital. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building and construction materials, including fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Exposure to asbestos-containing materials can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel throughout Sisters Hospital. Fireproofing material was mixed with water in a machine and sprayed onto the steel with a hose. The fireproofing process created clouds of asbestos dust, which remained airborne for days. Additionally, workers disturbed the fireproof insulation after it was applied in order to install pipes, ventilation ducts, framing studs and other equipment. When fireproof insulation was disturbed, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air.

Sisters Hospital was heated by steam produced in boilers. Steam was delivered to locations throughout the hospital through a network of pipes and radiators. Workers applied asbestos containing pipe covering to steam pipes at the Sisters Hospital in order to protect the pipes from damage and to maintain stable internal temperatures within the heating system. When pipe covering was cut and applied, asbestos dust and fibers were emitted. Insulating cement was also applied to pipe elbows and valves. Pouring and mixing insulating cement caused asbestos fibers to become airborne. Boilers were also covered in asbestos block insulation, which was cut to fit the contours of the boilers. When workers applied block insulation, asbestos dust was released into the air and inhaled by workers.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for Sisters of Charity Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with construction or renovation projects at Sisters of Charity Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Smith Transport, Inc.

Smith Transport, Inc. was a trucking company founded by Phillip Smith in 1919 in Oshawa, Ontario – a suburb of Toronto. The company started as a scrap metal carrier, but by the mid1950s, it had grown to become the largest trucking company in Canada, with terminals in Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg and other major Canadian cities. The Trans-Canada Highway didn’t begin construction until 1950 and officially opened in 1962. Before its completion, Smith Transport trucks had to cross the border into the United States in order to haul loads of freight to Canada’s west coast. This compelled Smith Transport to expand its operations into the United States.

By the mid-1960s, Smith Transport trucks were hauling freight throughout New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, including to and from various points along the US-Canada border. The company’s biggest terminal hubs in the United States were located in New York City and Tonawanda, New York – a suburb of Buffalo. In 1957, controlling interest in Smith Transport was purchased by Canadian Pacific Railway, and the company became a part of CP Express & Transport, later known as Interlink Freight System. The company closed in 1997.

As a trucking company, Smith Transport, Inc. was hired by other businesses to haul materials and products. These materials and products were not owned by Smith Transport; they were owned, manufactured and distributed by various companies throughout the United States and Canada. Prior to the late 1970s, some of these materials contained asbestos. Exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma and lung cancer. Smith Transport truck drivers regularly hauled talc from the Gouverneur Talc Mine in Northern New York State.

Smith Transport truck drivers also hauled raw asbestos from Canadian asbestos mines located in Montreal, Quebec to various businesses, including but not limited to Garlock Sealing Technologies in Palmyra, New York. These freights of talc and raw asbestos fibers were often packaged in flimsy cloth or burlap sacks that would easily tear open inside the truck trailers during loading, unloading and transport. The truck drivers employed by Smith Transport were responsible for sweeping and cleaning up their trailers after unloading, which gave rise to a tremendous amount of asbestos dust and fibers. This simple task exposed Smith Transport truck drivers, and potentially other employees at the loading docks and terminals, to talc and raw asbestos, putting them at high risk for developing asbestos-related diseases later in life.

Inhaling dust and airborne particles from transporting talc and raw asbestos put workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Smith Transport workers were not aware of the hazards of exposure to talc and asbestos when they performed their job duties without wearing masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with talc or raw asbestos materials still remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Smith Transport, Inc. and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us regarding your legal rights.

Solvay Process Company

The Solvay Process Company was founded in 1881 by Rowland Hazard and William B. Cogswell. It was the first company in the United States to utilize the Solvay process for manufacturing sodium carbonate, which was invented in Belgium in 1861 by Ernest Solvay. Syracuse, New York, was selected for Solvay’s first plant because of its plentiful resources for limestone and brine. In addition to sodium carbonate, the plant also manufactured calcium chloride and baking soda. In 1920, Solvay Process Company merged with Barret Chemical Company, General Chemical Company, National Aniline & Chemical Company and Semet-Solvay Company to form Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation. Solvay Process Company remained a subsidiary of Allied Chemical until 1985, when Allied closed the Solvay plant.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation were utilized in the maintenance and upkeep of the buildings at Solvay Process Company. Workers who applied or removed asbestos-containing materials, or individuals who were in the vicinity of where this work took place, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

At Solvay Process Company, systems of pipes, valves and pumps transported steam and chemicals used during the manufacturing processes for sodium carbonate, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide, calcium chloride, baking soda, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, sodium sesquicarbonate and calcium sulfate. Asbestos-containing insulation was applied to pipes and other equipment in order to contain corrosive materials and to maintain a stable internal temperature within the steam and chemical pipe systems. Workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment during maintenance or repair procedures. New insulation was applied when this process was finished. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation, emitted asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information regarding the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at Solvay Process Company and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Sorrento Cheese

The Sorrento Cheese Company was founded in 1947 by Louis Russo in Blasdell, New York. Russo was a native of Sorrento, Italy, and he established Sorrento Cheese in order to market traditional Italian cheeses to the rapidly growing Italian-American population. In 1960, the company moved to its present location on South Park Avenue in Buffalo.

Sorrento was acquired in 1988 by Source Perrier, a French bottled water company, and in 1992, it was sold to Besnier, SA, the largest dairy company in France. In 1999, the company became known as Sorrento Lactalis after Besnier changed its name to Groupe Lactalis. Sorrento manufactures mozzarella and ricotta cheese, and it is one of the largest cheese manufacturers in the United States.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized during maintenance procedures at Sorrento Cheese. Block insulation, asbestos rope, pipe covering and insulating cement contained asbestos. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos-related diseases. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Steam boilers used in the manufacturing process at Sorrento Cheese were covered in asbestos block insulation and access doors on the boilers were sealed with asbestos rope. Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to steam and hot water pipes throughout the Sorrento facility. Pipe elbows, pumps, valves and other equipment within the steam system were covered by asbestos-containing insulating cement. During maintenance or repair procedures, workers removed asbestos-containing insulation in order to access equipment within the steam system. After these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at Sorrento Cheese and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

South Buffalo Railway

The South Buffalo Railway Company was established in 1899, as a short-line railroad owned by the Lackawanna Steel Company, the predecessor to Bethlehem Steel. The railway also served other customers in Lackawanna, including Donner-Hanna Coke, Ford and Republic Steel.

The South Buffalo Railway spanned over fifty miles of track in Western New York. Bethlehem Steel owned the South Buffalo Railway until 2001, when it sold the railway to Genesee & Wyoming, Inc. The South Buffalo Railway was integral to steel making operations at Bethlehem Steel as it provided rail transport for the raw materials used to manufacture steel. The railway was the main form of transport between various points in the plant, including the basic oxygen furnace, open hearth furnaces, blast furnaces, coke ovens, bar mills and rolling mills.

In recent years, former employees of the South Buffalo Railway have developed and died from mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos insulation materials were utilized in South Buffalo Railway maintenance buildings. Pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered steam pipes and boilers within the buildings heating systems. When workers performed maintenance or repairs on the heating system, asbestos-containing dust became airborne, which workers inhaled.

During maintenance and repairs on railway equipment, asbestos-containing brake shoes and gaskets were frequently removed and replaced with new shoes or gaskets. The removal and installation processes of brake shoes and gaskets released asbestos fibers into the air, which workers inhaled.

Asbestos was incorporated into materials used during the steel making process, including refractory mortar and insulating boards. Asbestos was also incorporated into pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation, which insulated pipes and machinery at the plant. Laborers who worked in the vicinity of where these products were applied, removed or disturbed were at risk for asbestos exposure and at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Additionally, South Buffalo Railway employees who worked near the coke ovens were exposed to coke oven emissions. Exposure to coke oven emissions is a cause of lung, skin and other cancers.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed on the South Buffalo Railway in Lackawanna, New York and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

South Park High School

Established in 1915, South Park High School is a public school in the Buffalo City School District. Located on Southside Parkway in Buffalo, New York, the school serves several neighborhoods in South Buffalo. South Park High School is a four-story, 223,000 square foot building that enrolls around 800 students per year. It offers a full regents curriculum, as well as classes in business, horticulture and graphic arts.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized during construction and maintenance at South Park High School. Workers who handled asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Since its establishment in 1915, several renovations have been completed at South Park High School. During these renovations, workers may have been exposed to asbestos-containing pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement.

South Park High School’s heat was produced in steam boilers. Steam was delivered to radiators throughout the building through a network of pipes. Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation covered pipes, valves, pumps and boilers associated with the heating system. Worn asbestos insulation was removed during repairs or maintenance in order to access and repair equipment within the heating system. New asbestos containing insulation was applied after repair or maintenance procedures were completed. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulation emitted asbestos dust and fibers. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust and performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Inhaling dust and particles from cutting or applying asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even individuals who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease. If you or a loved one worked at South Park High School in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Spaulding Fibre

In recent years, former employees of Spaulding Fibre have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Laborers who were employed at the Wheeler Street plant in Tonawanda, New York, were at high risk for exposure to asbestos containing materials. Spaulding Fibre’s origins date back to 1873, when brothers Jonas and Waldo Spaulding formed the Spaulding Brothers Company in Massachusetts.

Shortly after, the company’s name changed to Spaulding and Sons when Jonas Spaulding and his family moved to New Hampshire and established leatherboard mills in Milton and North Rochester. The company’s success grew and the Spaulding Brothers’ added a vulcanized fiber operation in 1911 in Tonawanda, NY. The company, was once again, renamed Spaulding Fibre in 1927.

Spaulding Fibre’s Tonawanda Plant located on Wheeler Street started operations in 1912 with 40 employees. During its peak in the mid-1960s, Spaulding Fibre employed over 1,900 workers, with a $9 million dollar payroll. Unfortunately, labor woes, global economics and the de-industrialization of the Midwest and Northeast all took their toll on Spaulding Fibre leading to its demise in 1992 under its last moniker Spaulding Composites. The abandoned plant became an eyesore and a Brownfield site that was finally demolished in 2006.

Spaulding Fibre manufactured and fabricated industrial laminated plastics, hard vulcanized fiber, high strength glass filament-wound structures, fiberboards and specialty papers. From 1911 to 1992, Spaulding Fibre dominated Tonawanda’s employment and economic life. Spaulding Fibre became very well known for its Bakelite product (under the trade name Spauldite), which is a phenol formaldehyde resin material that utilized raw asbestos as a filler material, which was added in order to strengthen the product. Workers who handled raw asbestos or worked in the vicinity of others who did are at a high risk for injurious exposure, and at risk for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Prior to 1983, Spaulding Fibre incorporated asbestos materials into the production of many of its products, including its Bakelite product also known as Spauldite. Because of its fire resistant qualities, asbestos sheets and fibers were cut, woven and mixed with other materials on a constant basis, filling the plant’s buildings with asbestos dust. In addition, asbestos insulation was used to cover pipes and duct work throughout the Wheeler Street plant. Spaulding Fibre employees represented by the Lodge 2106 International Association of Machinists (AFL-CIO), the tool room employees union Lodge 586 IAM, and outside contractors, including carpenters, iron workers, insulators, and electricians were often exposed to high levels of asbestos dust, a major risk factor for developing mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis and other asbestos-related diseases.

Lipsitz, Ponterio & Comerford, LLC, has represented former Spaulding Fibre workers and retirees, as well as their families in their legal claims for mesothelioma and lung cancer. In the process of representing these workers and their families over the years, our firm’s attorneys have gained extensive knowledge of asbestos-containing products to which these workers were exposed. If you or a loved one were once employed at the Spaulding Fibre plant, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to con- tact us regarding your legal rights.

Specialty Insulation Manufacturing Company

Clinton L. Bateholts, a pioneer in the field of plastics, founded Specialty Insulation Manufacturing Company in 1910, in Hoosick Falls, New York. Specialty Insulation’s first plant was located on Water and Superior Streets and was known locally as the Rubber Works. The plant eventually moved to a larger facility on Center Street where workers manufactured molded plastic parts for the automotive industry up until 1987, when the company ceased operations.

Prior to the mid-1980s, Specialty Insulation used molding compounds that contained raw asbestos fibers. Molders, finishers and other laborers were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process of automotive plastic parts and other molded plastic products.

Asbestos posed an especially high-risk health danger to mold shop workers who transformed asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds into finished plastic parts. Even workers who did not have direct contact with asbestos-containing plastic molding compounds but worked in an area where it was manufactured or molded, are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma or lung cancer.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one were once employed at Specialty Insulation Manufacturing Company in Hoosick Falls, NY and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

St. Joseph’s Hospital, Syracuse

St. Joseph’s Hospital was founded in 1869 by the Sisters of Saint Joseph. Located on Prospect Avenue in Syracuse, New York, the hospital was originally a fifteen-bed facility housed in a converted saloon. As Syracuse’s population grew, St. Joseph’s Hospital underwent a series of expansions and renovations. The hospital currently has a 431-bed capacity, and it offers numerous outpatient clinics and treatment facilities.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement were utilized in the construction and maintenance of the ten buildings on the St. Joseph’s Hospital campus. Workers who applied and maintained asbestos-containing materials are at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used to heat the buildings at St. Joseph’s Hospital. Boilers produced steam, which was delivered to radiators through a network of pipes. Asbestos-containing insulation was applied to pipes, valves, pumps and boilers in order to maintain a stable internal temperature within the steam system. During maintenance and repair procedures, workers removed asbestos insulation in order to access equipment within the system. New insulation was applied when the repairs or maintenance were completed. Applying and removing asbestos-containing insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects for St. Joseph’s Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Central New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction and maintenance of St. Joseph’s Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

St. Lawrence University

St. Lawrence University was founded on April 3, 1856, by leaders of the Universalist Church seeking to establish a seminary. Beginning in the 1940s, the original four building campus expanded to include thirty buildings in order to accommodate its growing student population. The University is currently a non-denominational, private institution, which sits on 1,000 acres in Canton, New York. The campus serves 2,400 graduate and undergraduate students.

In recent years, laborers who assisted in the construction and maintenance of the buildings at St. Lawrence University have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized throughout the St. Lawrence campus. Asbestos was incorporated into many materials because of its durability and resistance to heat. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Fireproofers who applied asbestos-containing fireproofing materials, are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer. Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. Fireproof insulation was packaged in bags and then dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto steel using a hose. Fireproofing is a process by which structural steel is coated with fire resistant insulation to protect it from extreme heat. The fireproof insulation used during the construction of buildings throughout the St. Lawrence campus contained asbestos. During the fireproofing process, clouds of asbestos-containing dust filled the air. Fireproofers and those who worked by their side are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Asbestos-containing joint compound (mud) was also used during the construction of St. Lawrence University. Joint compound or mud, was used to fill seams and joints between sheets of drywall. After each layer of mud dried, it was sanded down to a smooth surface for painting. Asbestos fibers became airborne during both the mixing of asbestos joint compound and the sanding process. The release of asbestos dust fibers into the air put not only drywall finishers and plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who worked in the same vicinity.

Buildings throughout the St. Lawrence campus were heated by steam produced in numerous boilers. Steam was transported from the boilers to the buildings through a system of pipes. Pipes, valves, pumps and boilers in the steam system were typically covered in asbestos containing insulation. When maintenance or repairs were performed on the steam system, asbestos insulation was removed in order to access the equipment. When maintenance or repair work was completed, new asbestos insulation was applied. Removing and applying pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled. Most workers were unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust and performed their work without necessary protective gear.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at St. Lawrence University were employed by various contractors throughout Central and Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at St. Lawrence University and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

St. Mary’s Hospital, Rochester

Located on Genesee Street in Rochester, New York, St. Mary’s Hospital was established in 1857 by the Catholic Daughters of Charity. It was the first hospital established in Rochester, New York. In 1941, the current main building at St. Mary’s Hospital was constructed, and in 1985, a major expansion and renovation project was completed. St. Mary’s Hospital merged with Park Ridge Hospital in 1997, and the newly merged hospitals formed Unity Health System. Now known as Unity St. Mary’s Campus, the hospital has been nationally recognized for its community health care services and programs for the disadvantaged.

Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the construction and maintenance at St. Mary’s Hospital. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who did not work directly with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. Many union and nonunion laborers who worked on construction projects for St. Mary’s Hospital were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were employed as a laborer at St. Mary’s Hospital, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

St. Mary’s School for the Deaf

St. Mary’s School for the Deaf was established in Buffalo in 1853, as the first academic school for the deaf in the U.S. In 1898 St. Mary’s was relocated from Edward Street to its current location on Main Street. St. Mary’s School for the Deaf is dedicated to providing an education that will prepare deaf students to be self-directed, lifelong learners, who are productive members of society.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into many materials utilized at St. Mary’s School for the Deaf. Pipe covering, insulating cement, asbestos gaskets, packing material and block insulation covered pipes, boilers and associated equipment was used throughout the school. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer or other asbestos related diseases.

In order to maintain a steady internal temperature in the steam heat system, boilers, pipes and valves were insulated with asbestos-containing materials, such as pipe covering and block insulation. During maintenance and repair procedures, asbestos-containing materials were removed from the equipment, which gave rise to tremendous amounts of asbestos dust. After a repair was complete, new asbestos insulation was applied. Removing and applying asbestos-containing insulating materials caused asbestos fibers and dust to become airborne.

Boiler rooms are generally small, enclosed spaces. Prior to the late 1970s, boilers and pipes were covered with materials that contained asbestos. Because boiler rooms often had poor ventilation, any released asbestos dust continued to circulate in the air long after it was released from the boilers.

In the process of representing boilermakers and their families, our attorneys have gathered numerous medical and liability documents that could be instrumental in your legal representation. If you or a loved one were once employed at St. Mary’s School for the Deaf in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free and confidential case evaluation.

St. Regis Paper

St. Regis Paper was established in 1899 by George Sherman and David Anderson. In 1901, construction of a mill in Deferiet, New York, was completed. The Village of Deferiet was also built by St. Regis to serve as a company town for the mill’s employees. During its peak production years in the mid-20th Century, the mill employed around 900 people. St. Regis manufactured several different types of paper at its Deferiet mill, but its main product through most of the mill’s existence was newsprint. In 1984, the mill was acquired by Champion International. After fifteen years of slowing business and layoffs, Champion sold the mill to the Deferiet Paper Company. The mill closed in 2004, and in 2011, it was demolished.

Prior to the mid to late 1970s, boilers and associated steam and water pipes at the St. Regis Paper plant were covered with asbestos-containing block insulation, pipe covering and insulating cement. Asbestos-containing gaskets and packing material were also utilized within valves, pumps and flanges that were associated with steam and chemical systems. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Steam was used during manufacturing processes, and it was also used to heat buildings throughout the facility. A network of pipes delivered steam to radiators and manufacturing equipment. Boilers, pumps, valves and pipes were covered in asbestos-containing insulation. Workers who performed maintenance within the steam system removed asbestos insulation in order to gain access to the equipment. When these procedures were completed, new insulation was applied. The process of removing and applying asbestos insulation to equipment in the steam system caused asbestos-containing dust to become airborne.

In order to prevent leaks, pump shafts and valve stems within the steam system were wrapped with asbestos-containing packing material. During maintenance procedures, workers pulled worn packing material out of the pump or valve using a corkscrew-like device called a packing puller. New asbestos packing material was then cut to the proper length and installed. Removing and applying asbestos-containing materials gave rise to high levels of asbestos-containing dust, which workers inhaled.

Workers at St. Regis utilized asbestos-containing gaskets in order to ensure a tight seal between flanges on pipes, pumps and valves. Gaskets were fabricated from large sheets of asbestos-containing material. Cutting gasket material emitted asbestos fibers into the air. During maintenance procedures within pipe systems, valves and pumps, gaskets were removed and replaced. Scraping or removing gaskets also emitted asbestos-containing dust.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed at the St. Regis Paper Company mill in Deferiet, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Standard Buffalo Foundry

The Standard Buffalo Foundry a.k.a. Standard Foundry Company was founded by William A. Griffin and Edmund B. McKenna in the early 1900s. The foundry was located at 743 Hertel Avenue in Buffalo, New York, and it employed approximately 500 workers. The Standard Buffalo Foundry manufactured iron castings for the automotive industry. The Standard Buffalo Foundry closed in 1959.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in the manufacturing process and maintenance procedures at the Buffalo Standard Foundry in Buffalo, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at Standard Buffalo Foundry in Buffalo, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Statler Towers

With 1,100 guest rooms, three restaurants, a ballroom and numerous meeting rooms, the Hotel Statler was once the largest hotel in Buffalo, New York. Constructed in 1923, by Ellsworth Statler, it featured more guest rooms than any other hotel in Buffalo. With eighteen stories, it was the second-tallest building in the city. Hilton Hotels purchased the hotel in 1954, and it became known as the Statler Hilton. During Hilton’s ownership of the Statler, the building gradually transitioned its hotel rooms to office space. A local investment group led by William Hassett acquired the Statler Hilton in 1973, and renamed the building Statler Towers. Over the next thirty years, the building changed ownership several times. Financial difficulties forced several owners into bankruptcy, and the Statler Towers were sold at foreclosure auctions on three different occasions. In 2011, the building was acquired by Statler City, LLC, and renovations to the exterior and interior of the structure began.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into building materials used during construction, maintenance and renovations at the Statler Towers, including pipe covering, block insulation and insulating cement. Laborers who handled asbestos-containing materials at the Statler Towers

have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Most workers were completely unaware of the dangers of exposure to asbestos dust, and they performed their work without masks or protective gear.

Workers utilized asbestos-containing insulating materials in order to protect the steam and hot water systems at the Statler Towers. Steam and hot water pipes were insulated with asbestos-containing pipe covering and insulating cement. Because each room at Statler Towers was provided with steam heat and hot water, miles of asbestos-containing pipe covering coated these pipe lines. Steam boilers were also covered with asbestos block insulation in order to ensure the efficient operation of the heating system. Asbestos-containing insulating cement was applied to pipe elbows, pumps and valves. When asbestos-containing materials were removed or applied, asbestos fibers were emitted, which workers inhaled.

Many union and non-union laborers who were involved in construction, maintenance and renovation procedures at the Statler Towers were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with maintenance or renovations at the Statler Towers and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Stauffer Chemical Company

The Stauffer Chemical Company was located on Old Lewiston Road in Lewiston, New York. The plant was originally constructed in 1916 as the Niagara Smelting Company and acquired by Stauffer Chemical in 1942. Stauffer Chemical initially manufactured aluminum, but shortly the purchase of the Old Lewiston Road facility, the company began to manufacture industrial chemicals, including chlorine, sodium hydroxide, silicon, sulfur chloride and other chemicals. In 1957, Stauffer Chemical completed a major addition to its Lewiston facility in order to accommodate the demands for boron trichloride, an essential raw material used in the manufacture of rocket fuel. By 1958, and as the U.S. missile program was well underway, Stauffer Chemical’s Lewiston plant was considered the world’s largest boron trichloride

plant. Stauffer Chemical closed its Lewiston facility in 1976, and the plant was demolished in 1980.

Prior to the late 1970s, dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized at Stauffer Chemical’s Lewiston plant in the chemical manufacturing process and during maintenance procedures. Numerous trades, including cell house operators, chemical operators, boilermakers, millwrights, pipefitters and other laborers were exposed to asbestos during the manufacturing process of chemicals. These tradesmen were exposed to asbestos dust and fibers when asbestos-containing materials were applied and removed from equipment throughout the plant. Inhaling dust and particles from the manipulation of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing mesothelioma or lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases.

Stauffer Chemical was a large chemical processing facility located on over 200 acres of land near Mount St. Mary’s Hospital in Lewiston. The plant itself consisted of approximately seven buildings, including the cell house, sulfur pot building, boiler house, pipe shop, warehouse and an office building. Workers at Stauffer Chemical and outside contractors applied asbestos-containing insulation to chemical and steam lines, steam traps, boilers and chemical storage tanks throughout the plant. During the removal and application of asbestos-containing insulation, tooth saws and hammers were used to strip dry and worn insulation from surfaces. Asbestos gaskets, packing material and asbestos rope were also used in equipment throughout this facility. The process of removing, applying and manipulating asbestos-containing materials on a regular basis contaminated the air at Stauffer Chemical with asbestos dust and fibers, which workers inhaled.

Raw asbestos was also utilized in the manufacturing process of chlorine. Raw asbestos was mixed with caustic and used in cell construction in order to line inner parts of cells to make chlorine. In the process of opening and dumping bags of asbestos into a mixer, laborers inhaled asbestos dust and fibers.

Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma. If you or a loved one once worked at Stauffer Chemical Company, in Lewiston, New York, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Steam Generating Station – Oswego

Niagara Mohawk’s Oswego Steam Generating Station is located on the shore of Lake Ontario in the City of Oswego, New York. The Oswego Steam Station contains four fossil fuel steam electric generating units that were constructed between 1938 and 1956. Initially, the steam electric generating units were powered by coal, but in 1972, the units were converted and powered by oil.

Prior to the mid-1970s, asbestos was used extensively in the utility industry as insulation for high-heat temperature equipment, such as turbines, large boilers, pumps, steam lines and valves. Inhaling dust and particles from the application, maintenance and removal of asbestos insulation and other materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Most workers were not aware of the dangers of exposure to the asbestos dust, and carried on their work without masks or protective gear. Even workers who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Our attorneys have gathered a vast amount of information concerning the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. If you or a loved one once worked at Niagara Mohawk’s Oswego Steam Station and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer, please contact us for a free case evaluation.

Stromberg-Carlson

In 1894, the Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Manufacturing Company was established in Chicago, Illinois, by Alfred Stromberg and Androv Carlson. The company relocated to Rochester, New York, in 1902, after it was purchased by the Home Telephone Company. Located on Carlson Road, Stromberg-Carlson manufactured communications equipment for the telephone and radio industries. In 1955, it was acquired by General Dynamics, and its production shifted to electronics in support of General Dynamics’ defense contracts. By the 1970s, the Stromberg-Carlson division of General Dynamics employed nearly 5,000 people in the Rochester area. In 1982, Stromberg-Carlson was sold to United Technologies. The Rochester plant closed shortly afterward, and Stromberg-Carlson’s operations were moved to Lake Mary, Florida.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance at Stromberg-Carlson. Inhaling dust and particles from the application of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases. If you or a loved one were once employed at Stromberg-Carlson, and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

Strong Memorial Hospital

Strong Memorial Hospital was established in 1926, through funding provided by Kodak founder George Eastman and the heirs of former Kodak president Henry A. Strong. Owned and operated by the University of Rochester, Strong Memorial Hospital is part of the University of Rochester Medical Center.

As a teaching hospital, Strong provides education and training to current and prospective health professionals.

As demand for Strong Memorial Hospital’s services increased throughout the years, the hospital completed numerous expansions and renovations. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials used in the construction and maintenance of Strong Memorial Hospital. Fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and joint compound (mud) contained asbestos. Workers who handled these materials, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material came packaged in bags, which was dumped into a machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto Strong Memorial’s steel substructure. During the application process of fireproofing material, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air. Fire proofers who applied asbestos-containing fireproofing materials are at high risk for developing asbestos related diseases, including mesothelioma.

Even long after fireproofing material was applied, the smallest vibrations had the potential to dislodge fibers into the air. In addition to fire proofers, iron workers, plumbers and electricians who worked with rebar and conduits on or in the vicinity of fireproofing material, were also put at risk for exposure to asbestos fibers and dust.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering, insulating cement and joint compound or mud, were also used in the construction process of Strong Memorial Hospital. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

If you or a loved one were once employed in connection with the construction projects at Strong Memorial Hospital and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Albany

Founded in 1844, in order to train educators, the Normal School in Albany evolved from a two year program to a four year program in 1890, and eventually became known as the New York State College for Teachers in 1914. In 1962, the college formally became a part of the State University of New York (SUNY) system, and it was renamed State University of New York at Albany (SUNY Albany). Today, SUNY Albany boasts an enrollment of nearly 18,000 graduate and undergraduate students, covering three campuses in the Albany area.

SUNY Albany’s East Campus is its newest campus and was purchased in 1996. The complex, which formerly housed a pharmaceutical company, is composed of SUNY Albany’s Health Sciences and Cancer Research facilities. The school’s Downtown Campus, which is also the University’s oldest campus, is located one mile away from the New York State Capitol and housed the New York State College for Teachers from 1909-1966.

The SUNY at Albany main campus, also known as the Uptown Campus, was designed by Edward Durell Stone, a renowned American architect. The majority of its original buildings were built in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Uptown Campus features a central Academic Podium area, which includes four quadrangle dormitory complexes at its corners. This campus is also home to SUNY at Albany’s athletics complex, which includes the 4,500-seat SEFCU-University at Albany Arena and two of SUNY Albany’s main libraries, the University Library and the Science Library.

In recent years, workers employed in the construction and maintenance of the buildings at SUNY Albany have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos related diseases. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into dozens of building materials that were utilized throughout SUNY Albany’s campuses. Asbestos-containing fireproofing, joint compound, pipe covering, gaskets and asbestos floor tiles were used in the construction of many SUNY Albany buildings. Laborers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Asbestos-containing joint compound was utilized in the construction of many buildings at SUNY Albany. Joint compound or mud, was used to fill in the seams between sheets of drywall. It was manufactured as either ready-mix (an application-ready product) or as dry mix (a powder that requires water to form a paste for application). When dry mix joint compound was prepared for use, the acts of pouring and mixing the powder with water released asbestos fibers into the air. After joint compound was applied, it was sanded down to a smooth surface for painting. Sanding joint compound also released asbestos dust and fibers into the air putting not only plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the same vicinity.

Buildings throughout SUNY Albany’s downtown and uptown campuses were heated by steam produced in numerous boilers. The steam was transported from the boilers to the buildings through a system of pipes. Pipes, valves, pumps and boilers in the steam system were typically covered in asbestos-containing insulation. When maintenance or repairs were performed on the steam system, asbestos insulation was removed in order to access the equipment. When maintenance or repair work was completed, new asbestos insulation was applied. Removing and applying pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne, which workers inhaled.

In order to decrease sound levels within SUNY Albany dormitories, workers applied asbestos-containing acoustic plaster to the ceilings and walls. Similar to joint compound (mud), acoustic plaster was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water in a bucket or tub, in order to prepare it for application. Mixing acoustic plaster released asbestos fibers, which workers inhaled.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at SUNY Albany were employed by various contractors throughout New York State. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at SUNY Albany and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Binghamton

The State University of New York at Binghamton was originally a branch of Syracuse University, and it was established in 1946 as Triple Cities College. Students completed their first two years of study at Binghamton, and the next two years were fulfilled at Syracuse University. In 1950, Triple Cities College

was incorporated into the State University of New York (SUNY) system, and it was renamed Harpur College. Following a decade of growth, in 1961, Harpur College built a new campus in Vestal, New York. In 1965, Harpur College was designated a University Center within the SUNY system.

The campus currently spans 387 acres of land, and it contains over sixty buildings, including lecture halls, residential halls, laboratories, athletic facilities and administrative buildings. SUNY Binghamton is one of four SUNY universities that grant doctorate-level degrees, and it offers bachelor’s degrees in more than 130 areas of study. With nearly 15,000 in student enrollment, SUNY Binghamton is one of the largest universities in the SUNY system.

In recent years, laborers employed in the construction and maintenance of the buildings at SUNY Binghamton have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Dozens of asbestos-containing materials were utilized at SUNY Binghamton, including fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation. Workers who handled these materials are at high risk for developing an asbestos related disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Fireproof insulation was applied to the structural steel of buildings at SUNY Binghamton in order to protect the steel from potential fire damage. Fireproofing was manufactured as a dry mixture of linen, asbestos and cement, and it was packaged in fifty-pound bags. The dry insulation mix was poured into a spraying machine, mixed with water and sprayed onto structural steel using a hose. Pouring and spraying fireproof insulation caused clouds of asbestos dust and fibers to become airborne. Plumbers and electricians frequently disturbed the insulation after it was applied in order to gain access to equipment housed alongside the steel. When the insulation was disturbed, asbestos dust became airborne.

Buildings on the SUNY Binghamton campus were heated by steam produced in numerous boilers. The steam was transported from the boilers to the buildings through a system of pipes. Pipes, valves, pumps and boilers in the steam system were typically covered in asbestos-containing insulation. When maintenance or repairs were performed on the steam system, insulation was removed in order to access the equipment. When maintenance or repair work was completed, new insulation was applied. Removing and applying pipe covering, insulating cement and block insulation caused asbestos dust to become airborne.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at the SUNY Binghamton were employed by various contractors throughout the Southern Tier and Central New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at SUNY Binghamton and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Brockport

In 1836, the Baptist Association of Western New York attempted to establish a college in Brockport, New York. After construction commenced, the Baptist Association’s financial difficulties caused contractors to foreclose on the building and grounds. In 1841, forty-five Brockport citizens purchased the foreclosed property. The following year, the same group of citizens founded the Brockport Collegiate Institute.

The early years at Brockport were financially challenging, but the success of its academic program eventually gained attention from the state government. In 1867, the institute became known as Brockport State Normal School, when it was named one of the first state-sponsored Normal Schools. The Normal Schools focused on training teachers for elementary and high school education. Brockport State Normal School issued certificates allowing graduates to teach in the State of New York.

In 1942, the Normal School changed its name to Brockport State Teacher’s College, and it began issuing bachelor’s degrees. When the State University of New York system was established in 1948, the college became known as the State University of New York College at Brockport. During the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s, SUNY Brockport expanded and built its modern campus. New buildings were constructed as the college’s enrollment expanded due to the increase in the variety of majors offered. Currently, SUNY Brockport offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in a wide range of academic disciplines.

Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous materials used in the construction of Brockport’s campus. Fireproof insulation, pipe covering, insulating cement, block insulation, joint compound (mud), ceiling tiles, gaskets and floor tiles contained asbestos. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos, or worked in the vicinity of those who did, are at risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied to water and steam pipes throughout the SUNY Brockport campus, and asbestos block insulation covered the boilers. Handling, cutting or disturbing pipe covering or block insulation emitted asbestos fibers into the air. Because of their irregular shape, pipe elbows and valves required asbestos-containing insulating cement. The asbestos-containing cement was manufactured as a dry powder, and it was mixed with water to form a paste. Pouring and mixing the cement emitted asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Fireproofing is a process by which the structural steel of a building is coated with a fire resistant material to protect it from fire damage and high temperatures. Fireproof insulation was manufactured as a dry, fluffy substance, which was packaged in heavy paper bags. The dry mix was poured into a machine where it was mixed with water and sprayed onto the steel with a hose. The process of mixing, applying and spraying the insulation created massive clouds of asbestos-containing dust and fibers. In order to gain access to the structural steel, pipefitters, electricians, sheet metal workers, carpenters and other tradesmen routinely disturbed the fireproofing after it was applied. When workers disturbed the insulation, asbestos fibers were emitted into the air and in close proximity to the worker.

Vinyl asbestos floor tiles (VAT) were used in several buildings on Brockport’s campus. During shipment, some tiles were cracked or broken, which produced asbestos dust that contaminated the box. When a laborer opened the box and removed tiles, asbestos dust became airborne. Cutting vinyl asbestos tiles also emitted asbestos fibers and dust into the air.

At SUNY Brockport, asbestos-containing ready-mix joint compound was applied to seal seams between sheets of drywall. Ready-mix joint compound was commonly packaged in five gallon buckets, and it was applied without any additional preparation. After a coat of joint compound dried, it was sanded and another coat was applied. Sanding the joint compound emitted asbestos dust into the air, where it remained for quite some time.

Asbestos-containing acoustical ceiling tiles were installed in several buildings on the SUNY Brockport campus. Workers cut ceiling tiles to allow for lighting, ventilation, sprinkler heads or irregular wall shapes. Cutting ceiling tiles released asbestos fibers and dust into the air.

A system of steam pipes from the main boiler room supplied steam for heating buildings on the campus. Maintenance personnel replaced asbestos-containing gaskets used in pipe flanges on SUNY Brockport’s steam system. When a gasket was replaced, it was scraped off the flange. Removing and replacing gaskets released asbestos dust and fibers into the air.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at SUNY Brockport were employed by various contractors throughout Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at SUNY Brockport and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton was founded in 1906, along the banks of the Grasse River in St. Lawrence County, New York, as the School of Agriculture at St. Lawrence University. It was the first post-secondary, two-year College established in New York State. In 1941, the school was renamed the New York State Agricultural and Technical Institute.

In 1948, it became a member college of the State University of New York. The College received its final name change in 1987, when it became the State University of New York College of Technology at Canton (SUNY Canton). In 1997, SUNY Canton received bachelor’s degree granting approval from the SUNY Trustees and the Governor of New York State. SUNY Canton is presently a public college that offers one-year certificates, as well as associate degrees and bachelor’s degrees. In addition, SUNY Canton offers degrees through three academic schools: Canino School of Engineering and Technology, School of Business and Liberal Arts, and School of Health, Science and Criminal Justice.

The College currently enrolls over 3,000 undergraduates and employs nearly 200 academic staff. The 555 acre campus is comprised of 20 buildings. A majority of these buildings were built between the 1940s and 1970s. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos-containing materials were utilized in construction and maintenance of buildings at SUNY Canton in Canton, New York. Inhaling dust and particles from the application and removal of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk for developing serious health problems, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases.

Many union and non-union laborers who worked on construction projects at SUNY Canton were employed by various contractors throughout New York State. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at SUNY Canton and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Fredonia

Founded in 1826, the State University of New York College at Fredonia is one of the oldest campuses in the SUNY system, which is comprised of sixty four campuses. After the college was incorporated into the SUNY system in 1948, it began to rapidly increase in size. Located in Chautauqua County (southwest of Buffalo, New York), the campus has over thirty buildings, including fourteen residence halls, several lecture halls, a major athletic complex and concert theater. Prior to federal regulations placed on asbestos in the late 1970s, asbestos was a component of building materials, including joint compound, pipe covering and other building materials. In recent years, laborers who assisted in the construction of the SUNY Fredonia’s buildings have developed and died of mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases.

Construction of most of the college’s current buildings began in the early 1960s. Asbestos-containing fireproofing, joint compound and pipe covering were used in the construction of the buildings located throughout the campus. Fire proofers who applied asbestos-containing fireproofing materials, such as Monokote, are at high risk for developing an asbestos-related disease, including mesothelioma. Fireproof insulation is a mix of asbestos, cement and waste materials from linen mills. This material came packaged in bags, which was then dumped into a machine where it was mixed with water and then sprayed onto surfaces with a hose. During the application process, large clouds of dust and fibers were emitted into the air where the material was being applied.

Asbestos-containing joint compound and pipe covering were also utilized in the construction process of SUNY Fredonia’s buildings. Joint compound, or “mud” was used on seams and joints over drywall tape. After the compound dried, it was then sanded down to a smooth surface. During both the mixing process of asbestos joint compound and sanding process, dust and fibers were released into the air putting not only plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the same vicinity.

In the process of representing workers and their families, we have gathered a vast amount of information on the type and variety of asbestos-containing products to which our clients were exposed. Our clients understand the importance of securing legal representation as soon as possible after a diagnosis of mesothelioma or lung cancer. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at SUNY Fredonia and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or lung cancer, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Geneseo

Founded in 1871 as the Wadsworth Normal and Training School, the State University of New York College at Geneseo (SUNY Geneseo) became a state liberal arts college in 1948. SUNY Geneseo’s total enrollment is around 5,000 students and is considered to have one of the most rigorous academic programs in the SUNY system. The campus currently has over 100 buildings, including multiple dormitory complexes, apartment style student housing and state of the art academic buildings. Many of the dormitories on campus were built in the 1960s and 1970s. Prior to the late 1970s, asbestos was incorporated into numerous building materials. Asbestos-containing fire-proofing, joint compound and pipe covering were used in the construction of these buildings. Workers who handled materials that contained asbestos or those who worked in the vicinity of others who did are at risk for developing an asbestos related disease, such as mesothelioma.

Fireproofing is a process by which a building’s structural steel is coated with fire resistant insulation to protect it from high heat temperatures or damage from fire. Fireproof insulation was packaged in bags, which was then dumped into a machine, mixed with water, and sprayed onto the steel using a hose. The fireproof insulation used during the construction of buildings at SUNY Geneseo prior to the late 1970s contained asbestos. During both the fireproof mixing and application processes, large clouds of asbestos-containing dust were released into the air. Fireproofers and those who worked in the vicinity were likely exposed to asbestos. Additionally, tradesmen, such as pipefitters, electricians, ironworkers and carpenters routinely disturbed the fireproofing after it was installed in order to install pipes, conduits, wall framing, ventilation ducts and other building materials. Disturbing the insulation caused asbestos dust and fibers to become suspended in the air.

Asbestos-containing joint compound was also utilized in the construction of many buildings at SUNY Geneseo. Joint compound or mud, was used to fill in the seams between sheets of drywall. It was manufactured as either ready-mix (an application-ready product) or as dry mix (a powder that requires water to form a paste for application). When dry mix joint compound was prepared for use, the acts of pouring and mixing the powder with water released asbestos fibers into the air. After joint compound was applied, it was sanded down to a smooth surface for painting. Sanding joint compound also released asbestos dust and fibers into the air putting not only plasterers at risk for exposure, but others who also worked in the same vicinity.

Asbestos-containing pipe covering was applied and removed throughout various buildings on Geneseo’s campus. Pipe covering is used to protect water and steam pipes from damage, and maintain a steady temperature inside the pipe. Prior to the late 1970’s, asbestos was often used as a component in pipe covering because of the mineral’s inherent strength and ability to withstand high temperatures. Insulators used hand saws to cut pieces of pipe covering to a desired length, which emitted asbestos into the air and within the workspace.

Inhaling dust and particles from the application and maintenance of asbestos-containing materials placed workers at risk of developing serious health problems. Even those who were not in direct contact with asbestos materials remain at risk for the development of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Many union and nonunion laborers who worked on construction projects at SUNY Geneseo were employed by various contractors throughout Central and Western New York. If you or a loved one were once employed as a laborer at SUNY Geneseo and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we urge you to contact us regarding your legal rights.

SUNY Oswego

When the State University of New York College at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) was founded in 1861, it was known as the Oswego Primary Teachers Training School. In its early years, the school was located in the City of Oswego. In 1913, the college relocated to it